The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

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Rick
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The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by Rick » Fri Sep 21, 2012 1:35 am

In another thread on NDE's, speaking of my own limited knowledge/research on the subject, I said that "of what I've read of other's (NDE) experiences, it seems rather than awakening from it, it was more that they got "religion" from it, as opposed to awakening." I meant this in the sense that the experience, of those I've read about anyway, seemed to make for a kinder and gentler ego, a more tolerant, loving little self/me, as opposed to being a catalyst in awakening to Presence. In continuing my research I found the following account of a man who did in fact awaken in the sense I mean. I post it for your consideration.


The Dazzling Dark

A Near-Death Experience Opens the Door to a
PERMANENT TRANSFORMATION

by John Wren-Lewis


Before his experience occurred, John Wren-Lewis, mathematical physicist and humanist psychologist, was a primary exponent of the “Death of God” movement of the 1960s. He has published extensively and held several professorial appointments in the United States and the United Kingdom. He is currently hard at work finishing The 9:15 to Nirvana, a book that further elaborates on the subject of this article.

"Some, if we believe what they tell us, are born with God consciousness. Some struggle to achieve it by strenuous spiritual practice, though by all accounts the success rate isn’t (and never has been) encouraging. I had God consciousness thrust upon me in 1983, my sixtieth year, without working for it, desiring it, or even believing in it, and this has understandably given me a somewhat unusual perspective on the whole matter. In particular, I wonder if discipline isn’t altogether counterproductive in this context and the idea of spiritual growth totally mistaken.

Before I had my experience, I was a Freud-style skeptic about all things mystical. I wouldn’t have called myself an atheist or materialist; in fact I’d published extensively on the need for a religious world view appropriate to a humanity that has “come of age” in the scientific and technological area. But I emphasized that such a faith would have to be essentially positivistic, focused on the human potential for creative change, which I believed could become as effective in the social realm as it has been in the physical realm. I even believed it possible that the creative human personality might eventually discover technologies for transcending mortality, but I saw mysticism as a neurotic escape into fantasy, due to failure of nerve in the creative struggle.

What happened in 1983 could be classified technically as a near-death experience (NDE), though it lacked any of the dramatic visionary features that tend to dominate both journalistic and scholarly NDE accounts. As I lay in a hospital bed in Thailand, after eating a poisoned candy given me by a would-be thief on a long-distance bus, there were some hours when the medical staff thought I’d gone beyond recall. But I had no out-of-body vision of what was going on, no review of my life, no passage down a dark tunnel to a heavenly light or landscape, and no encounter with celestial beings or deceased relatives telling me to go back because my work on earth was not yet done. And although I’d lost all fear of death when eventually resuscitated, this had (and has) nothing to do with believing I have an immortal soul that will survive death.

On the contrary, it has everything to do with a dimension of aliveness here and now which makes the notion of separate survival a very secondary matter, in this world or any other. In fact it makes each present instant so utterly satisfying that even the success or failure of creative activity becomes relatively unimportant. In other words, I’ve been liberated from what William Blake called obsession with “futurity,” which, until it happened, I used to consider a psychological impossibility. And to my continual astonishment, for ten years now this liberation has made the conduct of practical life more rather than less efficient, precisely because time consciousness isn’t overshadowed by “anxious thought for the morrow.”

I didn’t even notice the change straightaway. My mind was too busy catching up on why I was in a hospital at night, with a policeman sitting at the foot of the bed, when the last thing I could remember was feeling drowsy on the bus in the early morning and settling down for a comfortable snooze on what was scheduled to be a seven-hour journey across the jungle-covered mountains. I’d suspected nothing, because the donor of the candy—a charming and well-dressed young man who’d been very helpful with our luggage—had left the bus some miles back. With hindsight, I guess he decided that retreat was the order of the day when he saw that my partner, dream psychologist Dr. Ann Faraday, wasn’t eating the candy he’d given her. (Ann’s heroic rescue, when I started turning blue and the bus driver insisted I was just drunk, is quite a story in its own right, but not the point here.)

The fact that I’d undergone a radical consciousness shift began to become apparent only after everyone had settled down for the night and I was left awake, feeling as if I’d had enough sleep to last a lifetime. By stages I became aware that when I’d awakened a few hours earlier, it hadn’t been from a state of ordinary unconsciousness at all. It was as if I’d emerged freshly made (complete with all the memories that constitute my personal identity) from a vast blackness that was somehow radiant, a kind of infinitely concentrated aliveness or “pure consciousness” that had no separation within it, and therefore no space or time.

There was absolutely no sense of personal continuity. In fact the sense of a “stop in time” was so absolute that I’m now convinced I really did die, if only for a few seconds or fractions of a second, and was literally “resurrected” by the medical team, though there were no brain-wave monitors to provide objective confirmation. And if my conviction is correct, it actually counts against rather than for the claim so often made by near-death researchers that personal consciousness can exist apart from the brain. My impression is that my personal consciousness was actually “snuffed out” (the root meaning, according to some scholars, of the word “nirvana”) and then recreated by a kind of focusing-down from the infinite eternity of that radiant dark pure consciousness. An old nursery rhyme conveys it better than any high philosophy:

Where did you come from, baby dear?
Out of Everywhere into here.

Moreover that wonderful “eternal life of everywhere” was still there, right behind my eyes—or more accurately, at the back of my head—continually recreating my whole personal body-mind consciousness afresh, instant by instant, now! and now! and now! That’s no mere metaphor for a vague sensation; it was so palpably real that I put my hand up to probe the back of my skull, half wondering if the doctors had sawn part of it away to open my head to infinity. Yet it wasn’t in the least a feeling of being damaged; it was more like having had a cataract taken off my brain, letting me experience the world and myself properly for the first time—for that lovely dark radiance seemed to reveal the essence of everything as holy.

I felt like exclaiming, “Of course! That’s absolutely right!” and applauding every single thing with tears of gratitude—not just the now sleeping Ann and the small jar of flowers the nurse had placed by the bedside, but also the ominous stains on the bed sheets, the ancient paint peeling off the walls, the far from hygienic smell of the toilet, the coughs and groans of other patients, and even the traumatized condition of my body. From the recesses of my memory emerged that statement at the beginning of the book of Genesis about God observing everything “he” had made and finding it very good. In the past I’d treated these words as mere romantic poetry, referring only to conventionally grand things like sunsets and conveniently ignoring what ordinary human consciousness calls illness or ugliness. Now all the judgments of goodness or badness which the human mind necessarily has to make in its activities along the line of time were contextualized in the perspective of that other dimension I can only call eternity, which loves all the productions of time regardless.

It was mind-blowing even then, when I was taking for granted that this had to be a jumbo-sized “mystical experience” visited on me, of all people, as a kind of cosmic joke, from which I must quite soon “return to normal.” I envisaged making public recantation of my antimystical views and joining the formerly despised ranks of spiritual seekers. Because my skeptical bias had been recreated along with the rest of my memories, I toyed with the possibility that I might simply be suffering some aftereffect of the poison, which the doctors had diagnosed as probably being a heavy dose of morphine laced with cocaine. I didn’t really believe this, however, because there was no trace of the “trippy” feeling that was always present when I took part in a long series of officially sponsored experiments with high-dosage psychedelics back in the late 1960s.

Later, when the eternity consciousness continued into the following days, weeks, months, and years, any ordinary kind of drug explanation was obviously ruled out. Moreover my bewilderment was intensified as I discovered how all kinds of “negative” human experiences became marvels of creation when experienced by the Dazzling Dark. To convey even a fraction of what life is like with eternity consciousness would take a whole book and I’m currently in the last stages of writing one. It must suffice here to illustrate two features that have most impressed me and others who know me, notably Ann.

First, if there were a section in the Guinness Book of Records for cowardice about physical pain, I would be sure of a place there. But with eternity consciousness, pain becomes simply a warning signal which, once heeded (irrespective of whether a physical remedy is available), becomes simply an interesting sensation, another of nature’s wonders. The Buddha’s distinction between pain and suffering, which I used to think was equivocation, is now a common experience for me. And second, my erstwhile spectacular dream life has been replaced, on most nights, by a state which I can only call “conscious sleep,” where I’m fully asleep yet distantly aware of lying in bed. It is as if the Dark has withdrawn its game of “John Wren-Lewising” to a nonactive level where the satisfaction of simply being is totally unrelated to doing.

The main point I want to make here, however, is that perhaps the most extraordinary feature of eternity consciousness is that it doesn’t feel extraordinary at all. It feels quintessentially natural that personal consciousness should be aware of its own Ground, while my first fifty-nine years of so-called “normal” consciousness, in ignorance of that Ground, now seem like a kind of waking dream. It was as if I’d been entranced from birth into a collective nightmare of separate individuals struggling in an alien universe for survival, satisfaction and significance.

Even so, there have been plenty of problems in adjusting to awakened life, because the rest of the world is still taking the separation state for granted, and my own “resurrected” mind still contains programs based on the assumptions of that state. So in the early days I made every effort to assume the role of spiritual seeker in the hope of finding help. It came as a real disappointment to find that no one I consulted, either in person or through books, had a clue, because ancient traditions and modern movements alike take for granted that the kind of eternity consciousness I’m living in is the preserve of spiritual Olympians, the mystical equivalent of Nobel laureates.

Fortunately the mystical state seems to have a growth pattern of its own which is gradually enabling me to deal with the adjustment problems—and a fascinating process it is. In the meantime, however, I’m very concerned that all the seekers I come across accept as a law of the spiritual universe that they have to be content with years—perhaps many reincarnational lifetimes—of hopeful traveling, rewarded at best with what T.S. Eliot called “hints and guesses” of the eternity-conscious state, whereas I see that state as the natural human birthright.

My intensive investigations in this area over the past decade have left me in no doubt that proponents of the so-called Perennial Philosophy are correct in identifying a common “deep structure” of experience underlying the widely different cultural expressions of mystics in all traditions. Nonetheless I find no evidence whatever for the often-made claim that these traditions contain disciplines for attaining God consciousness that have been empirically tested and verified. On the contrary, the assumption that God consciousness is a high and special state seems like the perfect defense mechanism for not asking whether spiritual paths are really leading there at all. Yet this is a very pertinent question, since many mystics whose utterances most clearly resonate as coming from life in the eternity-state have asserted that their awakening was “an act of grace” (or words to that effect) rather than a reward for effort on their part.

Indeed the more I investigate, the more convinced I become that iconoclastic mystics like Blake and Jiddu Krishnamurti were right in asserting that the very idea of a spiritual path is necessarily self-defeating, because it does the one thing that has to be undone if there is to be awakening to eternity: it concentrates attention firmly on “futurity.” Paths and disciplines make gnosis a goal, when in fact it is already the ground of all knowing, including “sinful” time-bound knowing. To me now, systems of spirituality seem like analogues of those dreams which prevent waking up (for example, to wet a thirsty throat or relieve the bladder) by creating a never- ending nocturnal drama of moving towards the desired goal, encountering and overcoming obstacle after obstacle along the way, but never actually arriving.

In other words, I’ve begun to realize that my former skepticism wasn’t all bad. I think now that I was like the ignorant peasant boy in Hans Christian Andersen’s famous story who simply wouldn’t go along with the courtiers’ wishful thinking about the emperor’s glory in his new clothes. My mistake was to put down the impulse that causes spiritual seekers to want a greater glory than ordinary life affords and makes them hope it’s there in the great traditions, even when they have no experiential evidence of it. Or to switch to an even older fable, I decided that heavenly grapes must be delusory when I could see that none of the ladders people were climbing in pursuit of them ever reached the goal.

Now I not only understand the urge to find something altogether beyond the shallow satisfactions and the blood, sweat, toil, and tears of this petty pace, but I know from firsthand experience that the “joy beyond joy” is greater than the wildest imaginations of a consciousness bogged down in time. But I can also see that the very impulse to seek the joy of eternity is a Catch-22, because seeking itself implies a preoccupation with time, which is precisely what drives eternity out of awareness. Even disciplines designed to prize attention away from doing are simply another form of doing, which is why they at best yield only occasional glimpses of the eternal Ground of consciousness in Being.

So what to do? One thing I learned in my former profession of science was that the right kind of lateral thinking can often bring liberation from Catch-22 situations, provided the Catch-22 is faced in its full starkness, without evasions in the form of metaphysical speculations beyond experience. This is the exploration to which my life is now dedicated. It’s a research project in which anyone who’s interested can join, because the very fact of being interested means that somewhere at the back of your head you are already as aware of the Ground of consciousness as I am. So rather than take up my little remaining space with any of my own tentative conclusions, I’ll end with a couple of cautionary hints.

First, beware of philosophies that put spiritual concerns into a framework of growth or evolution, which I believe are the great modern idols. Both are important phenomena of eternity’s time theater, but as paradigms they’re old hat, hangovers from the age of empire-building and the work ethic. We should know better today, when astronomers have shown that the kind of planetary destruction that was once imagined as a possible divine judgment could in fact be brought about at any time by the perfectly natural wanderings of a stray asteroid.

The “I want it now” attitude, so often deplored by spiritual pundits as a twentieth-century sin, is in my view a very healthy sign that we are beginning to be disillusioned with time-entrapment. A truly mystical paradigm has to be post-evolutionary, a paradigm of lila, divine play for its own sake, where any purposes along the line of time, great or small, are subordinate to the divine satisfaction that is always present in each eternal instant. Mystical gnosis is knowing the instant-by-instant delight of Infinite Aliveness in all manifestation, irrespective of whether, from the purely human standpoint, the manifestation is creative or destructive, growing or withering, evolving towards some noetic Omega or fading out.

My second warning is to mind your language, for the words we use are often hooks that catch us into time entrapment. For example, when we use the term “self” with a small “s” to describe individual personhood, and “Self” with a capital “S” for the fullness of God consciousness, the notion of the one gradually expanding into the other becomes almost inescapable, again concentrating attention along the time line. Mystical liberation, by contrast, is the sudden discovery that even the meanest self is already a focus of the Infinite Aliveness that is beyond any kind of selfhood.

Again, when the word “home” is used to describe eternity, there is an almost irresistible temptation to think of life as a journey of return, whereas mystical awakening for me has been like Dorothy’s in The Wizard of Oz: the realization that I never really left home and never could. Here too T.S. Eliot has the word for it: “Home is where one starts from.” Finite life is a continual instant-by-instant voyaging out from the “eternal Home” into the time process to discover new “productions of time” for eternity to love as they arise and pass away.

Against this background, the main positive advice I would give to spiritual seekers is to experiment with any practice or idea that seems interesting—which is what the Buddha urged a long time ago, though not too many of his followers have ever taken that part of his teaching seriously. Ancient traditions and modern movements alike may be very valuable as databases for new adventures, but to treat them as authorities to be obeyed is not only “unscientific”—it seems actually to go against the grain of the divine lila itself, since novelty is apparently the name of the time game
.
I suspect gnosis comes as “grace” because there are as many different forms of it as there are people. Yet because we’re all in this together, sharing experience is integral to its fullness. Whatever experiments you make, share your “failures,” your hints and guesses, and your awakening too if it happens, with warts-and-all honesty, because “everything that lives is holy.”
Daily life IS spiritual exercise.

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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by smiileyjen101 » Fri Sep 21, 2012 2:25 pm

In another thread on NDE's, speaking of my own limited knowledge/research on the subject, I said that "of what I've read of other's (NDE) experiences, it seems rather than awakening from it, it was more that they got "religion" from it, as opposed to awakening." I meant this in the sense that the experience, of those I've read about anyway, seemed to make for a kinder and gentler ego, a more tolerant, loving little self/me, as opposed to being a catalyst in awakening to Presence. In continuing my research I found the following account of a man who did in fact awaken in the sense I mean. I post it for your consideration.
Hey rick, I did belatedly respond to that in the other thread (p9)) of it, not sure if you saw it. Basically for me in seeing all the collapsed... everything an equilibrium of equilibrium across many different 'factors' I call it the energy of love, because love accepts all things, believes all things yadda yadda as outlined in that post.

That someone could also view the equilibrium of equilibrium as the dazzling dark I have absolutely no problem with it. It makes, and his post makes, absolute sense to me. That I refer to it as 'the light' and he refers to it as the
from a vast blackness that was somehow radiant, a kind of infinitely concentrated aliveness or “pure consciousness” that had no separation within it, and therefore no space or time.
and I refer to it as the an amazing light of pure consciousness also with radiance, concentrated aliveness with no separation (all collapsed possibilities within it) and the collapse of space and time and perspectives in dimension.. for me since I've found that wonderful word.. equilibrium.

He also shares my notions that 'practice' and 'seeking' and turning attentions this way and that and inside out and upside down is ....pppfffftttt .. no choice is wrong yadda yadda but that is not BEING and that the 'nothing' some seek is actually the acceptance of everything rather than perspectives of this or the absence of that.
it has everything to do with a dimension of aliveness here and now which makes the notion of separate survival a very secondary matter, in this world or any other. In fact it makes each present instant so utterly satisfying that even the success or failure of creative activity becomes relatively unimportant.
This for me speaks the same as 'no choice is wrong, it just brings a different experience.
That he talks in the absences of other people's experiences not being like his, in some ways I would say to him for him to see his own quote above - it's irrelevant. His aliveness here and now is the 'shift' in his consciousness and with it he has an appreciation now of the equilibrium of everything as a perfection of itself.

In terms of him trying to gauge his or others' experiences, it should be known to him that it is irrelevant for the most part because it's actually not really 'personal'.
In terms of the experience I notice it more in this 'appreciation' and how it filters in, through, from and around those with this altered state of 'knowing' the 'what happens next' that he details and while he recognises that he 'deals' with the details of his personal experiences, how he got there, how well or not he sleeps, what moves him now etc he also realises that very little is really about 'him', hence the sense of eternally moving / changing / creating consciousness in wider equilibrium than he noticed, realised, or was conscious or aware of 'before'
Moreover that wonderful “eternal life of everywhere” was still there, right behind my eyes—or more accurately, at the back of my head—continually recreating my whole personal body-mind consciousness afresh, instant by instant, now! and now! and now!
That made me laugh.. that's the 'yum' (the yes!!) that one might call 'getting religion'. If you think about it it is this 'freedom' that the essence of creative energy that many have tried to capture and espouse is this. I call this... eternal life everywhere instant by instant now! and now! ... love, but I'm okay with however they express that joy of it, the generosity and gratitude equilibrium of knowing the all eternal life of everywhere.
I felt like exclaiming, “Of course! That’s absolutely right!” and applauding every single thing with tears of gratitude
That he then realises there is no difference in the flowers or the stains on the sheet is also absolutely 'right'.
From the recesses of my memory emerged that statement at the beginning of the book of Genesis about God observing everything “he” had made and finding it very good. In the past I’d treated these words as mere romantic poetry, referring only to conventionally grand things like sunsets and conveniently ignoring what ordinary human consciousness calls illness or ugliness. Now all the judgments of goodness or badness which the human mind necessarily has to make in its activities along the line of time were contextualized in the perspective of that other dimension I can only call eternity, which loves all the productions of time regardless.
Like 'farts' or people dying, or murders or weeds or agate or anything one would 'normally' value less as an expression of the all, is part of the everything being 'good' - if you add this to ET's notion of acceptance, enjoyment and enthusiasm - a traffic jam... is 'good' if you apply the same appreciation to it as to any other circumstance.
Later, when the eternity consciousness continued into the following days, weeks, months, and years, any ordinary kind of drug explanation was obviously ruled out. Moreover my bewilderment was intensified as I discovered how all kinds of “negative” human experiences became marvels of creation when experienced by the Dazzling Dark. To convey even a fraction of what life is like with eternity consciousness would take a whole book
... imagine if he played with it for 30 years :lol:
I kind of like his 'Dazzling Dark' it sounds 'fun'. In terms of equating experiences, which I don't like to do, I can say in mine the part of it in the tunnel was as alive in the 'dark' with 'all embracing' awareness as the light, without the quantum detail if that makes sense. It also had the 'contrasts' of light at each end - physical activity and atmosphere in 'artificial' light that was dim and ... is secular the right word in that it kind of only allowed those in it to see from an artificial, secular perspective, and at the other end.. well.. the light of 'all' very much like whosever description it was about it allowing viewing from every perspective like lighting up all the cracks and crevices and shelving and roofing in a huge warehouse.

But the 'state' of our energy was the same in embracing the all (while out of body) regardless of whether it was in the tunnel, the 'light' or the artificial light - the state of consciousness and capacity was the same, it was the 'environment' that was different. I 'knew' as much in different collapsed aspects in the tunnel, in the rooms below and in the light - it's just that there was 'more' to 'see' and 'know' in the light - the knowing was always there and always now, now, now regardless.

I have heard of nde's having a similar impact on people with a variety of 'experiences' of it, but they all knew - no fear of death and this incredible embracing of the all. And a renewed energy of difference in their experiencing.

One my dad (the agnostic) knew who felt himself slipping out through his feet and into a blackness - he recalled nothing but panic at the leaving of his body and was similarly 'changed' by the experience, without being able to explain it. Another who claimed he experienced nothing started to show generosities and gratitude that had previously been absolutely foreign to him, yet he still claimed 'nothing happened'. So whether it's 'nothing' or 'everything', 'light' or 'dark' he's right, it's the after effects that let you know you have absolutely changed through the experience.
First, if there were a section in the Guinness Book of Records for cowardice about physical pain, I would be sure of a place there. But with eternity consciousness, pain becomes simply a warning signal which, once heeded (irrespective of whether a physical remedy is available), becomes simply an interesting sensation, another of nature’s wonders.
See for me this is akin to the notion I've come to know of suffering (resistance) being the distance between expectation and reality - if you expect to go through physical life with no pain you are in for some mighty suffering. If you accept pain as a reality in a circumstance, it's just pain, it too will pass, and you only experience it one moment at a time - no big deal to get all worked up about.

This for me applies to physical, mental/psychological, emotional and even in empathy spiritual pain energies ... sensations. Once I identify and accept it, no problem. I lived for many years with an intermittent intensely painful condition, I accepted it, dealt with it and if at times it took 95% of my 'capacity', so be it I would accept that and cope with everything else with the 5% left over. It does have a drawback of at times underestimating the pain threshold capacity and underplaying something that might be better with more urgent attention earlier rather than later. But he's right on that it's really expectation/reality being brought into balance - equilibrium again.
The main point I want to make here, however, is that perhaps the most extraordinary feature of eternity consciousness is that it doesn’t feel extraordinary at all. It feels quintessentially natural that personal consciousness should be aware of its own Ground, while my first fifty-nine years of so-called “normal” consciousness, in ignorance of that Ground, now seem like a kind of waking dream. It was as if I’d been entranced from birth into a collective nightmare of separate individuals struggling in an alien universe for survival, satisfaction and significance.
In some ways what he is seeing here is a life review after the event, its exactly the same as is 'noticed' in the light in a review. And yes people in their searching for something more 'extraordinary' sometimes go straight past the 'natural' into some other strange state of - as I query at times an unnatural and seemingly enforced no ground no life, no joy, no thought allowed consciousness that seems to require permanent attention and practice and commitment and rejection of most of the elements of the 'all' being experienced, it makes no sense to me that this would seem either an achievable or desirable attainment - where is the JOY in it, now, now, now! It is right here, right now whatever and wherever.
came as a real disappointment to find that no one I consulted, either in person or through books, had a clue, because ancient traditions and modern movements alike take for granted that the kind of eternity consciousness I’m living in is the preserve of spiritual Olympians, the mystical equivalent of Nobel laureates.
hahaha, he should have tried it a few decades earlier when they thought you had to be a Saint!! or else it was the Devil's work. But again, eventually you realise it is what it is... and your expectation and reality find an equilibrium that doesn't 'expect', but it can still be hopeful.

I like his advices on spirituality, and in it I think I see maybe what calm man speaks about 'spirituality' it's not how I 'view' it in my own experiences, it's not a practice looking for something outside of anything, or separate to anything, for me it's a knowing / awareness in something, now, now now and that level of in' is always now and always and much of that was in my cultural understanding anyway .. probably why they burnt us at the stake lol!!

I'd add it doesn't mean your farts won't stink in awareness - remember the beauty is of all things. It is what it is and there is much peace to be had in accepting that. If you can recognise the equilibrium in everything you will have no thing to make an enemy, obstacle or means to an end of or for. now, now, now.

thanks for sharing rick.
Not sure why you had to label it 'non dual' though :wink:
Our rights start deep within our humanity; they end where another's begin~~ SmileyJen
http://www.balancinginfluences.com

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Rick
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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by Rick » Wed Oct 03, 2012 10:04 pm

From the book "From Self to Self" by Leo Hartong

Question: In near death experiences it is said that the soul sometimes leaves the body and sees the situation from above, noticing things that could never be seen from the bodies perspective. If there is no separate self as Advaita (non-duality) teaches, how can there be a separate soul? In short, how does the concept of a soul fit into a non-dual perspective? Who is it that sees from the ceiling in a NDE? How does seeing take place without a body?

Answer: The seeing you refer to does not automatically imply a separate soul. THAT which appears as everything can also appear as the seeing in a NDE. The next step that is often reported in NDE's is that there seems to be a perceived threshold, which the person having the experience considers a point of no return. From the perspective of Advaita, going beyond that threshold is simply the final step, after which the illusion of one's separate individuality merges back into the oceanic Self...(but) the ultimate answer (to this question) is not in the mind. The mind lives in, and by the grace of, the ultimate answer...As always, I point back to THAT which is aware of the mind.
Daily life IS spiritual exercise.

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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by ashley72 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 12:29 am

rick wrote:Answer: The seeing you refer to does not automatically imply a separate soul. THAT which appears as everything can also appear as the seeing in a NDE. The next step that is often reported in NDE's is that there seems to be a perceived threshold, which the person having the experience considers a point of no return. From the perspective of Advaita, going beyond that threshold is simply the final step, after which the illusion of one's separate individuality merges back into the oceanic Self...(but) the ultimate answer (to this question) is not in the mind. The mind lives in, and by the grace of, the ultimate answer...As always, I point back to THAT which is aware of the mind.
Image

Answer: An out-of-body experience (OBE or sometimes OOBE) is an experience that typically involves a sensation of floating outside one's body and, in some cases, perceiving one's physical body from a place outside one's body (autoscopy).
The term out-of-body experience was introduced in 1943 by George N. M. Tyrrell in his book Apparitions, and was adopted by researchers such as Celia Green and Robert Monroe as an alternative to belief-centric labels such as "astral projection", "soul travel", or "spirit walking". OBEs can be induced by brain traumas, sensory deprivation, near-death experiences, dissociative and psychedelic drugs, dehydration, sleep, and electrical stimulation of certain parts the brain, among others.
Mainstream science considers the OBE a type of hallucination that can be caused by various psychological and neurological factors. Some parapsychologists and occult writers treat OBEs as evidence that a soul, spirit or subtle body can detach itself from the body and visit distant locations.
One in ten people has an out-of-body experience once, or more commonly, several times in his or her life. But scientists still know little about the phenomenon.

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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by ashley72 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 12:47 am

The two possibilities of NDE have been put forth.


1. Mainstream science considers the OBE a type of hallucination that can be caused by various psychological and neurological factors.

2. Some parapsychologists and occult writers treat OBEs as evidence that a soul, spirit or subtle body can detach itself from the body and visit distant locations.

Possibilities mean nothing unless you assign probabilities against them based on direct observations. For example, the probability that the person will fall if they step of the edge of the ledge is 1. The probability that the person will walk on air has a probability of 0. These values are based on billions of observations. These are facts on the ground.

If I was assigning probabilities against each of NDE possibilities I would be listening to the Neuroscientists and not the occult writers when assigning probabilities. Neuroscientist study brain function, brain function is still functioning during NDE's so clearly these folks (Neuroscientists) have the best answers.

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Rick
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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by Rick » Thu Oct 04, 2012 12:53 am

ashley72 wrote:Mainstream science considers the OBE a type of hallucination that can be caused by various psychological and neurological factors
.
ashley72 wrote:But scientists still know little about the phenomenon.
ashley72 wrote:The two possibilities of NDE have been put forth.
Only two possibilities? I seriously doubt science will ever know the limits of what Source is capable of experiencing in/through the human form or otherwise.
Daily life IS spiritual exercise.

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smiileyjen101
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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by smiileyjen101 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 3:30 am

Limited perceptions and perspectives - I thought I'd play with the one above -
NB, in my perspective the arrow in the one above is going the wrong way - it's not from the physical body looking 'out' it's from the 'out' seeing the physical body from different perspectives - if the physical body is what one is 'looking' at.


Image


Think google earth rather than google street view.


....
brain function is still functioning during NDE's so clearly these folks (Neuroscientists) have the best answers.
So you keep saying Ash, without providing the 'answers' to the questions raised in first hand experience.
Our rights start deep within our humanity; they end where another's begin~~ SmileyJen
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smiileyjen101
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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by smiileyjen101 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 6:10 am

Here's another neuroscientist's perspective.

Different to my own, absolutely, and yet... as a respected neurosurgeon / neuroscientist who has first hand experience in this 'other' consciousness perspective - I'm listening :)
this from the youtube video -
"None of the neuroscientific theories explain...."

"I do not believe that there is a good neurophysiological explanation for what happened to me"
Dr Eben Alexander - Neuroscientist in a discussion with skeptics on the tipping point of science : ) my kinda conversation!!
Skeptiko
This podcast is a leading source for intelligent, hard-nosed skeptic vs. believer debate on science and spirituality. Each episode features lively discussion with leading researchers, thinkers, and their critics.
....Interview reveals how a near-death experience changed everything neurosurgeon Dr. Eben Alexander thought he knew about consciousness, spirituality, and life after death.

Join Skeptiko host Alex Tsakiris for an interview with neurosurgeon Dr. Eben Alexander. During the interview Dr. Alexander discusses letting go of our simplistic view of consciousness:

Alex Tsakiris: Can we really then hope to get out of the consciousness loop that we’re in now? Or is there something fundamental to the way that we’re constructed that’s going to keep us limited in how much we can really?

Dr. Eben Alexander: What I think is going to happen is that science and spirituality, which will be mainly be an acknowledgement of the profound nature of our consciousness, will grow closer and closer together.

One thing that we will have to let go of is this kind of addiction to simplistic, primitive reductive materialism because there’s really no way that I can see a reductive materialist model coming remotely in the right ballpark to explain what we really know about consciousness now.

Coming from a neurosurgeon who, before my coma, thought I was quite certain how the brain and the mind interacted and it was clear to me that there were many things I could do or see done on my patients and it would eliminate consciousness. It was very clear in that realm that the brain gives you consciousness and everything else and when the brain dies there goes consciousness, soul, mind—it’s all gone. And it was clear.

Now, having been through my coma, I can tell you that’s exactly wrong and that in fact the mind and consciousness are independent of the brain. It’s very hard to explain that, certainly if you’re limiting yourself to that reductive materialist view.
more on the interview here http://www.skeptiko.com/154-neurosurgeo ... xperience/

and a youtube video narrated in the yummy tones of Morgan Freeman - leaving not answers but perspectives of the questions lingering still... and snippets from Dr Bruce Greyson, psychiatrist. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZN8bsq2Ic-4

and a further discussions here in clips from Through the Wormhole. http://www.lifebeyonddeath.net/author
Last edited by smiileyjen101 on Thu Oct 04, 2012 6:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
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ashley72
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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by ashley72 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 6:23 am

Rick wrote:
ashley72 wrote:Mainstream science considers the OBE a type of hallucination that can be caused by various psychological and neurological factors
.
ashley72 wrote:But scientists still know little about the phenomenon.
ashley72 wrote:The two possibilities of NDE have been put forth.
Only two possibilities? I seriously doubt science will ever know the limits of what Source is capable of experiencing in/through the human form or otherwise.
The two possibilities are the most common generalisations. :wink:

1. Scientific explanations based on brain function & neurological factors using a scientific method of inquiry based on empirical and measurable evidence subject to specific principles of reasoning.

2. Paranormal experiences that lie outside "the range of normal experience or scientific explanation". Occultism is regarded as unscientific as it does not make use of the standard scientific method to obtain facts.


Let's explore possibility 1. a little more closely:

Out-of-body hallucinations can be freaky, and are often associated with mental or physical illness. New research has linked these experiences to instabilities in a part of the brain called the temporal lobe, and to errors in the body's sense of itself — even in healthy individuals.

"Seems to be that all of us can be placed somewhere along a sliding scale, based on how unstable or erratic our temporal lobe is, and some people are more prone to these experiences," said study researcher Jason Braithwaite of the University of Birmingham.

The temporal lobe interprets the sensory and other information coming in from the body and places it on a body map, giving us our sense of being inside our body, of looking out from our eyes. If this interpretation goes wrong, a hallucination can occur in which a person sees themselves from outside of their body, also called an out-of-body experience (OBE).


Experiencing the body

Out-of-body experiences are traditionally thought of as occurring during a near-death experience, but these aren't the only situations in which OBEs occur. They often occur during relaxed and wakeful states, or during migraines or temporal lobe seizures. About 10 percent of people in the general population have experienced an OBE. In college undergraduates, this number is double (researchers don't know why), usually falling somewhere between 20 and 25 percent.

In the researchers' sample of 63 undergraduates, 17 individuals (26 percent) reported having experienced an OBE. The volunteers filled out a questionnaire to assess their mental state. Those who had reported having an OBE showed differences on only two parts of the questionnaire: those that indicate instabilities in the brain's temporal lobe and errors in the body's sense of itself.

To measure a participant's temporal lobe stability, the surveys included questions such as: "Do you ever sense the presence of another being, despite being unable to see any evidence?” An example question from the body-distortion measures: "Do you ever have the sensation that your body, or part of it, is changing or has changed shape?"

Participants also completed a computer-based task where they were asked to imagine being in the place of a figure on the screen and to identify parts of the body (like "Which hand is the figure's glove on?"). People who had experienced OBEs were slower in their responses and more prone to make errors.

Distorted data

The distortion in our sense of bodily self could be caused by either conflicting information coming in from the body, or from disruptions of communication in the temporal lobe, which processes this information into a body map, Braithwaite told LiveScience.

"Your sense of self, of where you are in space, is not automatic, your brain needs to work it out all the time," Braithwaite said. "It's constantly sampling that information and constantly making that interpretation of where you are in space, and sometimes that interpretation goes wrong."

When this interpretation goes wrong, it could be the cause of an out-of-body experience.

The study was published in the July 2011 issue of the journal Cortex.

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ashley72
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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by ashley72 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 6:59 am

smileyjen101 wrote:...Interview reveals how a near-death experience changed everything neurosurgeon Dr. Eben Alexander thought he knew about consciousness, spirituality, and life after death.
Let me guess... he's most likely flogging an occult book and making a small fortune from it. :lol:

Does he have any published scientific journal papers on his scientific theories regarding the afterlife & NDE?

Dr Eben Alexander testimony starts along the lines: "7 days after "virtual" brain death... he emerged from the Coma." the presentation is like a Hollywood thriller.... with Morgan Freeman narrating with his "god-like" voice. :lol:

In medicine, a coma (from the Greek κῶμα koma, meaning deep sleep) is a state of unconsciousness lasting more than six hours, in which a person: cannot be awakened; fails to respond normally to painful stimuli, light, or sound; lacks a normal sleep-wake cycle; and, does not initiate voluntary actions. A person in a state of coma is described as being comatose. A person in a coma might be suffering from temporal lobe instability.

A person in a coma has not experienced brain death... which by the way is an irreversible process.... to describe a coma as "virtual" brain death is what we call an exaggeration. An example of exaggeration would be: “I was walking along when suddenly this enormous dog walked along. It was as big as an elephant”. :lol:

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ashley72
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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by ashley72 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 7:16 am

Here's my scientific proof from a recognised Medical Journal.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20598679

Cognitive correlates of the spontaneous out-of-body experience (OBE) in the psychologically normal population: evidence for an increased role of temporal-lobe instability, body-distortion processing, and impairments in own-body transformations.
Braithwaite JJ, Samson D, Apperly I, Broglia E, Hulleman J.


Source

Behavioural Brain Sciences Centre, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK. j.j.braithwaite@bham.ac.uk
Abstract

"Recent findings from studies of epileptic patients and schizotypes have suggested that disruptions in multi-sensory integration processes may underlie a predisposition to report out-of-body experiences (OBEs: Blanke et al., 2004; Mohr et al., 2006). It has been argued that these disruptions lead to a breakdown in own-body processing and embodiment. Here we present two studies which provide the first investigation of predisposition to OBEs in the normal population as measured primarily by the recently devised Cardiff anomalous perception scale (CAPS; Bell et al., 2006). The Launay-Slade Hallucination scale (LSHS) was also employed to provide a measure of general hallucination proneness. In Study 1, 63 University students participated in the study, 17 of whom (26%) claimed to have experienced at least one OBE in their lifetime. OBEers reported significantly more perceptually anomalies (elevated CAPS scores) but these were primarily associated with specific measures of temporal-lobe instability and body-distortion processing. Study 2 demonstrated that OBEers and those scoring high on measures of temporal-lobe instability/body-distortion processing were significantly impaired, relative to controls, at a task requiring mental own-body transformations (OBTs) (Blanke et al., 2005). These results extend the findings from epileptic patient studies to the psychologically normal population and are consistent with there being a disruption in temporal-lobe and body-based processing underlying OBE-type experiences."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15935132

The demystification of autoscopic phenomena: experimental propositions.
Mohr C, Blanke O.


Source
Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, 8 Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1TN, United Kingdom. christine.mohr@bristol.ac.uk

Abstract

Autoscopic phenomena (AP) are rare, illusory visual experiences during which the subject has the impression of seeing a second own body in extrapersonal space. AP consist of out-of-body experience, autoscopic hallucination, and heautoscopy. Recent neurologic reports support the role of multisensory integration deficits of body-related information and vestibular dysfunctions in AP at the temporo-parietal junction. A caveat to test the underlying neurologic and cognitive mechanisms of AP has been their rare and spontaneous occurrence. Recent evidence linked AP to mental own-body imagery engaging brain mechanisms at the temporo-parietal junction. These recent observations open a new avenue for testing AP-related cognitive mechanisms in selected clinical and normal populations. We review evidence on several clinical syndromes (psychosis, depression, anxiety, depersonalization, body dysmorphic disorder), suggesting that some of these syndromes may relate to AP-proneness, thereby leading to testable propositions for future research on body and self processing in addition to AP.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16186034

The out-of body experience: precipitating factors and neural correlates.
Bünning S, Blanke O.


Source
Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland.

Abstract
Out-of-body experiences (OBEs) are defined as experiences in which a person seems to be awake and sees his body and the world from a location outside his physical body. More precisely, they can be defined by the presence of the following three phenomenological characteristics: (i) disembodiment (location of the self outside one's body); (ii) the impression of seeing the world from an elevated and distanced visuo-spatial perspective (extracorporeal, but egocentric visuo-spatial perspective); and (iii) the impression of seeing one's own body (autoscopy) from this perspective. OBEs have fascinated mankind from time immemorial and are abundant in folklore, mythology, and spiritual experiences of most ancient and modern societies. Here, we review some of the classical precipitating factors of OBEs such as sleep, drug abuse, and general anesthesia as well as their neurobiology and compare them with recent findings on neurological and neurocognitive mechanisms of OBEs. The reviewed data suggest that OBEs are due to functional disintegration of lower-level multisensory processing and abnormal higher-level self-processing at the temporo-parietal junction. We argue that the experimental investigation of the interactions between these multisensory and cognitive mechanisms in OBEs and related illusions in combination with neuroimaging and behavioral techniques might further our understanding of the central mechanisms of corporal awareness and self-consciousness much as previous research about the neural bases of complex body part illusions such as phantom limbs has done.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15632275


The out-of-body experience: disturbed self-processing at the temporo-parietal junction.
Blanke O, Arzy S.


Source
Functional Brain Mapping Laboratory, Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. olaf.blanke@hcuge.ch

Abstract
Folk psychology postulates a spatial unity of self and body, a "real me" that resides in one's body and is the subject of experience. The spatial unity of self and body has been challenged by various philosophical considerations but also by several phenomena, perhaps most notoriously the "out-of-body experience" (OBE) during which one's visuo-spatial perspective and one's self are experienced to have departed from their habitual position within one's body. Here the authors marshal evidence from neurology, cognitive neuroscience, and neuroimaging that suggests that OBEs are related to a failure to integrate multisensory information from one's own body at the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). It is argued that this multisensory disintegration at the TPJ leads to the disruption of several phenomenological and cognitive aspects of self-processing, causing illusory reduplication, illusory self-location, illusory perspective, and illusory agency that are experienced as an OBE.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14662516

Out-of-body experience and autoscopy of neurological origin.
Blanke O, Landis T, Spinelli L, Seeck M.


Source
Laboratory of Presurgical Epilepsy Evaluation, Programme of Functional Neurology and Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. olaf.blanke@hcuge.ch
Erratum in
Brain. 2004 Mar;127(Pt 3):719.

Abstract
During an out-of-body experience (OBE), the experient seems to be awake and to see his body and the world from a location outside the physical body. A closely related experience is autoscopy (AS), which is characterized by the experience of seeing one's body in extrapersonal space. Yet, despite great public interest and many case studies, systematic neurological studies of OBE and AS are extremely rare and, to date, no testable neuroscientific theory exists. The present study describes phenomenological, neuropsychological and neuroimaging correlates of OBE and AS in six neurological patients. We provide neurological evidence that both experiences share important central mechanisms. We show that OBE and AS are frequently associated with pathological sensations of position, movement and perceived completeness of one's own body. These include vestibular sensations (such as floating, flying, elevation and rotation), visual body-part illusions (such as the illusory shortening, transformation or movement of an extremity) and the experience of seeing one's body only partially during an OBE or AS. We also find that the patient's body position prior to the experience influences OBE and AS. Finally, in five patients, brain damage or brain dysfunction is localized to the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). These results suggest that the complex experiences of OBE and AS represent paroxysmal disorders of body perception and cognition (or body schema). The processes of body perception and cognition, and the unconscious creation of central representation(s) of one's own body based on proprioceptive, tactile, visual and vestibular information-as well as their integration with sensory information of extrapersonal space-is a prerequisite for rapid and effective action with our surroundings. Based on our findings, we speculate that ambiguous input from these different sensory systems is an important mechanism of OBE and AS, and thus the intriguing experience of seeing one's body in a position that does not coincide with its felt position. We suggest that OBE and AS are related to a failure to integrate proprioceptive, tactile and visual information with respect to one's own body (disintegration in personal space) and by a vestibular dysfunction leading to an additional disintegration between personal (vestibular) space and extrapersonal (visual) space. We argue that both disintegrations (personal; personal-extrapersonal) are necessary for the occurrence of OBE and AS, and that they are due to a paroxysmal cerebral dysfunction of the TPJ in a state of partially and briefly impaired consciousness.


Other than occult writers making millions, flogging books to the many superstitious folk out there... can you offer any published scientific research which offers a glimpse of the afterlife? It needs to be published in a scientific journal no books of fiction thanks.

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smiileyjen101
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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by smiileyjen101 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 7:49 am

Let me guess... he's most likely flogging an occult book and making a small fortune from it.
As opposed to - operating on people's brains and making a small fortune from it? Teaching neuroscience at a university and making a small fortune from it?

Is that an example of a limited view that looks only at the ' primitive reductive materialist model'?
Do you think it's addictive? It certainly seems to be accompanied by euphoric energies.

I dunno, what do you think of his qualifications to discuss neuroscience compared to yours?
And, do any of the authors cited above have first hand experience?


Happy to see your CV - here's his -
Dr. Eben Alexander, III, M.D., F.A.C.S
Biography
Education:
1975 A.B. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
1980 M.D. Duke University School of Medicine
Postdoctoral Training
Internship and Residencies:
1980-1981 Intern in General Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
1981-1983 Resident in Neurological Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
1985 Acting Resident in Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
1985-1987 Resident in Neurological Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
1987 Senior Registrar and Cerebrovascular Fellow, Neurosurgical Service, Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, England, U.K.
1988-1990 Instructor in Surgery, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

Research Fellowships:
1983-1985 Research Fellow in Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
1987 Research Fellow in Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

Licensure and Certification:
1980 Residents Training License, North Carolina
1987 30888 North Carolina [Expires December 2011]
1987 58762 Massachusetts License [Expires Dec 2011]
2004 12520 New Hampshire License [inactive]
2005 0101239440 Virginia License [Expires December 2012]
1991 91066 Diplomat, American Board of Neurological Surgery, November, 1991 [Voluntarily involved in the Maintenance of Certification Program 29301, Recertification due 12/31/2019]
1996 Inducted as a Fellow, American College of Surgeons (F.A.C.S.)

Academic Appointments:
1978-1979 Research Assistant, Neuroendocrinology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
1988-1990 Instructor in Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
1990-1994 Assistant Professor in Surgery (Neurosurgery), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
1990-2001 Assistant Professor in Radiation Therapy, Joint Center for Radiation Therapy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
1994-2001 Associate Professor in Surgery (Neurosurgery), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
2001-2003 Associate Professor in Surgery (Neurosurgery), UMass Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts
2004-2006 Consultant, Gerson Lehman, New York, NY
2008-present Assistant Professor of Research in Neurological Surgery, University of Virginia Medical School, Charlottesville, Virginia
He's a busy man, more below...
Last edited by smiileyjen101 on Thu Oct 04, 2012 7:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
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ashley72
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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by ashley72 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 7:49 am

If you're serious about Out-of-Body experiences and what they mean. Read up about Temporoparietal junction. =>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temporoparietal_junction

The temporoparietal junction (TPJ) is an area of the brain where the temporal and parietal lobes meet, at the posterior end of the Sylvian fissure. This area is known to play a crucial role in self-other distinction processes and theory of mind (TOM) and damage to this area has been implicated in producing out-of-body experiences (OBEs). OBEs may also be induced by electrically stimulating the TPJ. Electromagnetic disruptions of the TPJ have been shown to affect individuals' abilities to make moral decisions.

Image

http://bemri.org/publications/electroma ... ation.html

Disruption of the right temporoparietal junction with transcranial magnetic stimulation reduces the role of beliefs in moral judgments

When we judge an action as morally right or wrong, we rely on our
capacity to infer the actor’s mental states (e.g., beliefs, intentions).
Here,wetest the hypothesis that the right temporoparietal junction
(RTPJ), an area involved in mental state reasoning, is necessary for
making moral judgments. In two experiments, we used transcranial
magnetic stimulation (TMS) to disrupt neural activity in the RTPJ
transiently before moral judgment (experiment 1, offline stimulation)
and during moral judgment (experiment 2, online stimulation).
In both experiments, TMS to the RTPJ led participants to rely less on
the actor’s mental states. A particularly striking effect occurred for
attempted harms (e.g., actors who intended but failed to do harm):
Relative toTMSto a control site,TMSto the RTPJ caused participants
to judge attempted harms as less morally forbidden and more
morally permissible. Thus, interfering with activity in the RTPJ disrupts
the capacity to use mental states in moral judgment, especially
in the case of attempted harms.

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smiileyjen101
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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by smiileyjen101 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 7:50 am

Dr Eben Alexander continued
Recent Appointments:
2008-2010 Clinical Director of the Brain Program, Focused Ultrasound Surgery Foundation, Charlottesville, Virginia

Hospital Appointments:
1988-2003 Associate Surgeon, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
1988-2003 Associate Surgeon, The Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
1988-2003 Associate Surgeon, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
1994-2001 Director of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Brigham & Women's Hospital Boston, Massachusetts
1998-2003 Clinical Associate in Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital Boston, Massachusetts
2001-2003 Active Staff, Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts

2004-2005 Sabbatical

2005-2006 Corporate Consulting: Gerson Lehrman Group, New York, NY
2006-2007 Active Staff, Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, Lynchburg General Hospital-CentraHealth, Lynchburg, Virginia

Other Professional Positions and Major Visiting Appointments:
1978 Research Assistant in Neurosurgery, University of Minnesota School of Medicine
1980 Research Assistant in Pathology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest University
1989 Visiting Lecturer and Panelist, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine International Symposium on Stereotactic Radiosurgery
1989 Invited Lecturer, Neurology/Neurosurgery Grand Rounds, Harvard-Longwood Medical Area.
1989 Invited Faculty, Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Radionics Course in Stereotactic Techniques, Congress of Neurological Surgeons Meeting, Atlanta, Georgia
1989 Invited Lecturer, Nursing Grand Rounds, Brigham and Women's Hospital
1989 Invited Faculty, Luncheon Discussion Group on Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Congress of Neurological Surgeons Meeting, Atlanta, Georgia
1990 Co-Director, Panelist, Lecturer, Moderator, Harvard Medical School Continuing Education Course, Radiosurgery Update.
1990 Invited Lecturer and Consultant, Varian Corporation, Palo Alto, CA
1990 Invited Lecturer and panelist, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, "Neurosurgery Update", post-graduate course
1990 Invited Lecturer, 14th annual New York Neurosurgery Symposium
1990 Invited Lecturer, Skull base tumor Workshop, Hannover, Germany
1990 Invited Lecturer, Framingham Union Hospital Medical Grand Rounds
1991 Invited Lecturer, Neurology/Neurosurgery Grand Rounds, Harvard-Longwood Medical Area.
1991 Invited Consultant, General Electric Medical Imaging Systems, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
1991 Invited Lecturer, First International Symposium on MR-Guided Laser Interventions, Harvard Medical School.
1991 Invited Lecturer, Providence Medical Center, Portland, Oregon.
1991 International Organizing Committee, Invited Lecturer, Moderator, International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Symposium, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
1991 Invited Lecturer, Panelist, 9th European Congress on Neurosurgery, Moscow, USSR.
1991 Invited Lecturer, German-Austrian Stereotactic Workshop, Finkenberg, Austria.
1991 Invited Lecturer, Medical Grand Rounds, St. Anne's Hospital, New Bedford, Massachusetts
1991 Invited Lecturer, General Scientific Session, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Orlando, Florida.
1991 Invited Lecturer, Boston Society of Neurology and Psychiatry.

1992 Invited Lecturer, Methodist Hospital Neurosurgical Grand Rounds, Indianapolis, Indiana
1992 Invited Lecturer, Pennsylvania State Neurosurgical Society, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
1992 Invited Lecturer, Practical Course, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, San Francisco, California
1992 Invited Lecturer, Breakfast Seminar, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, San Francisco, California
1992 Invited Consultant, General Electric Medical Imaging Systems, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
1992 Invited Lecturer, Neurology/Neurosurgery Grand Rounds, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, Massachusetts
1992 Invited Lecturer, Workshop on Stereotactic Techniques, European Society of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Stockholm, Sweden
1992 Invited Lecturer, Symposium on Neuro-Radio-Surgery, Vienna, Austria
1992 Invited Lecturer and Panelist, Joint Section on Tumors Session, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Washington, D.C.
1992 Invited Lecturer, Practical Course on Radiosurgery, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Washington, D.C.
1992 Invited Lecturer and Panelist, Radiosurgery Course, American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, San Diego, California
1992 Invited Lecturer, Western Medical Center, Santa Ana, California
1992 Invited Lecturer, Tumors of the Central Nervous System, Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education, Boston, MA.

1993 Invited Lecturer, Practical Clinic, American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting, Boston, Massachusetts
1993 Invited Lecturer, Breakfast Seminars, American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting, Boston, Massachusetts
1993 Invited Lecturer, Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, Adelaide, Australia
1993 Invited Lecturer, Stereotactic Radiosurgery/Brachytherapy Workshop, Adelaide, Australia
1993 Invited Lecturer, Auckland Hospital Neurosurgery, Auckland, New Zealand
1993 Invited Lecturer, International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society, 1st Congress Meeting, Stockholm, Sweden
1993 Invited Speaker, Santorini Radiosurgery Workshop, Santorini, Greece
1993 Invited Consultant, General Electric Medical Imaging Systems, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
1993 Invited Lecturer, UCLA Stereotactic Neurosurgery/Radiosurgery Course, Los Angeles, California
1993 Invited Lecturer, Practical Course, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
1993 Invited Lecturer, Luncheon Discussion Group, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
1993 Panelist and Moderator, XI th Meeting of the World Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Ixtapa, Mexico
1993 Invited Lecturer, Tumors of the Central Nervous System, Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education, Boston, MA
1993 Invited Lecturer, Intensive Review in Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education, Boston, MA
1993 Invited Lecturer, Grand Rounds, Neurology and Neurosurgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC

1994 Fischer-Leibinger Visiting Professor in Stereotactic Neurosurgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
1994 Invited Lecturer, Asia-Pacific Minimally Invasive Neurosurgery Conference, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
1994 Visiting Professor, Ministry of Health, Government of Singapore, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore
1994 Visiting Professor, Pramongkutklao Medical School, Bangkok, Thailand
1994 Invited Lecturer, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
1994 Invited Lecturer, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong
1994 Invited Lecturer, Beijing, China
1994 Invited Lecturer, Zhong Shan Hospital, Shanghai, China
1994 Invited Lecturer, Guangxhou, China
1994 Invited Lecturer, Australian Stereotactic Workshop, Saint Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, Australia
1994 Director and Speaker, Practical Course, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, San Diego, CA
1994 Invited Speaker, Breakfast Seminars, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, San Diego, CA
1994 Invited Speaker, Harvard Longwood Oncology Group Spring Symposium, Boston, MA
1994 Invited Speaker, Interactive Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School Continuing Education, Boston, MA (6/23/94)
1994 Invited Lecturer, UCLA Course on Minimally Invasive Therapy of the Brain, Los Angeles, CA (8/25-27/94)
1994 Invited Lecturer and Panelist, First Brazilian Workshop of Stereotactic Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery, San Paulo, Brazil (9/1-3/94)
1994 Invited Lecturer and Panelist, XX Congresso Brasileiro de Neurocirurgia, Belo Horizonte, Brazil (9/4-8/94)
1994 Invited Speaker, Grand Rounds, The Brockton Hospital Symposium, Brockton, MA (9/16/94)
1994 Invited Speaker, The Preuss Foundation Symposium on Stereotactic Radiation Treatments for Brain Tumors, Boston, MA (9/28-30/94)
1994 Invited Lecturer, Breakfast Seminar, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Chicago, Illinois (10/1-6)
1994 Invited Lecturer, Interventional MRI Symposium, Society for Magnetic Resonance, Boston, MA (10/8-9)
1994 Invited Lecturer, Stereotactic Neurosurgery - Hands On, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, New Orleans, LA (10/28-29)
1994 Invited Lecturer, Radiosurgery for Brain Tumors, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL (11/4-5)
1994 Invited Lecturer, Intensive Review in Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education, Boston, MA

1995 Invited Lecturer, Medical Grand Rounds, Brigham & Women's Hospital
1995 Invited Lecturer, Practical Course, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Orlando, FL (4/22)
1995 Invited Lecturer, Tumor Section Symposium, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Orlando, FL (4/26)
1995 Invited Speaker, Breakfast Seminars, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Orlando, FL (4/22-27)
1995 Invited Lecturer and Panelist, 2nd Congress of the Spanish Radiosurgery Society, Madrid, Spain (4/28)
1995 Invited Special Lecturer, Panelist, 10th European Congress on Neurosurgery, Berlin, Germany (5/9).
1995 Invited Lecturer and Panelist, Virtual Reality in Medicine and Developer's Expo, Boston, MA
1995 Invited Lecturer, X-knife Consortium Meeting, Boston (6/13/95)
1995 Program Chairman, Lecturer, Moderator, International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society 2nd Congress Meeting, Boston, MA 6/14-17/95)
1995 Invited Lecturer, Joint International Congress on Minimally Invasive Techniques in Neurosurgery and Otolaryngology, Pittsburgh, PA (6/19)
1995 Invited Panelist, Practical Course, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, San Francisco, California (10/15)
1995 Invited Lecturer, Luncheon Discussion Groups, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, San Francisco, California (10/16,18)
1995 Invited Speaker, General Electric Intraoperative MR Symposium, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, San Francisco, California (10/18)
1995 Invited Lecturer, General Scientific Plenary Session, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, San Francisco, California (10/19)
1995 Invited Panelist and Consultant, Center for Health Care, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, San Francisco, California (10/20)
1995 Invited Professor, Overlook Hospital, Summit, New Jersey (10/27)
1995 Invited Lecturer, New Jersey State Neurosurgical Society, New Brunswick, New Jersey (10/27)
1995 Invited Lecturer, Tumors of the Central Nervous System, Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education, Boston (11/14-15)
1995 Invited Lecturer, Stereotactic Neurosurgery - Hands On, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, New Orleans, LA (11/17-18)
1995 Invited Lecturer, XKnife Consortium, Orlando, FL (12/5)
1995 Invited Lecturer, LINAC Radiosurgery, 1995, University of Florida, Orlando, FL (12/6-10)

1996 Visiting Professor, Chicago Institute of Neurosurgery and Neuroresearch, Chicago, IL (12/22)
1996 Invited Lecturer and Panelist, 2nd International Skull Base Congress, VII Annual Meeting North American Skull Base Society, San Diego, CA, (6/29-7/4)
1996 Invited Lecturer and Panelist, Conference on Stereotactic Target Localization Techniques, Boston, MA, (7/20-7/21)
1996 Invited Lecturer, LINAC Stereotactic Radiosurgery/Radiotherapy Symposium, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (9/7)
1996 Invited Lecturer, Stereotactic Radiosurgery Workshop, Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan (9/8)
1996 Invited Lecturer, Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy Workshop, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong (9/10)
1996 Invited Lecturer, Symposium on Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Computer-Assisted Neurosurgery, Apollo Hospital, New Delhi, India (9/12)
1996 Special Guest Lecturer, Oregon Neurosurgical Society, Salishan Lodge, Oregon (10/18)
1996 Special Guest Lecturer, Oregon Neurosciences: Cost Effectiveness
1996, Salishan Lodge, Oregon (10/18)
1996 Visiting Professor, New Jersey Medical School, Newark NJ (10/22-23)
1996 Neurosurgery Grand Rounds, Hackensack Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ (10/23)
1996 Invited Lecturer, UCLA - XKnife User Group, Los Angeles, CA (10/26)
1996 Invited Lecturer, Tumors of the Central Nervous System, Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education, Boston (11/26)
1996 Anesthesia Grand Rounds, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (11/27)

1997 Pain Service Grand Rounds, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (2/24)
1997 Invited Lecturer, MRI Basic to Advanced, General Electric Meeting, Breckenridge, CO (3/16)
1997 Visiting Professor, Maine Neurosurgical Society Meeting, Sugarloaf, ME (4/4-6)
1997 Invited Lecturer, Practical Course, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Denver, CO (4/14)
1997 Invited Lecturer, General Electric Intraoperative MR Symposium, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Denver, CO (4/16)
1997 Invited Speaker, Breakfast Seminars, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Denver, CO (4/15,18)
1997 Invited Lecturer, Anesthesia/Critical Care Grand Rounds, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA (5/21)
1997 Invited Lecturer and Moderator, International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society 2nd Congress Meeting, Madrid, Spain (6/25-28/97)
1997 Speaker, Panelist and Moderator, XII th Meeting of the World Society of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Lyon, France (7/1-4/97)
1997 Invited Speaker and Moderator, 11th International Congress of Neurological Surgery, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (7/6-11/97)
1997 Visiting Professor, Tulsa Neurosciences Society, Tulsa, OK (9/11-12)
1997 Invited Panelist, Practical Course, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, New Orleans, LA (9/27-10/1)
1997 Invited Lecturer, Luncheon Discussion Groups, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, New Orleans, LA (9/27-10/1)
1997 Invited Speaker, General Electric Intraoperative MR Symposium, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, New Orleans, LA (9/27-10/1)
1997 Invited Lecturer, General Scientific Plenary Session, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, New Orleans, LA (9/27-10/1)
1997 Invited Lecturer, Brain Tumor Society, Boston, MA (11/1)
1997 Invited Lecturer, Tumors of the Central Nervous System, Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education, Boston (11/25)

1998 Invited Speaker and Moderator, XKnife Radiosurgery Society Meeting, Philadelphia, PA (4/25)
1998 Invited Speaker, "Meet the Professor Session", American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, CA (5/16)
1998 Invited Speaker, General Electric Intraoperative MR Symposium, UHUHS: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Washington, DC (6/3)
1998 Invited Lecturer, Pain Management Seminar, Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education, Boston (6/13)
1998 Invited Lecturer, Tumors of the Central Nervous System, Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education, Boston (9/28)

1999 Invited Lecturer, "Entering the Mind Zone: A Comprehensive Neuroscience Program", Brigham & Women's Hospital Nurse Education (1/13)
1999 Invited Lecturer, West Virginia Medical Society, Charleston, WV (1/22)
1999 Invited Speaker, AANS Joint Section on Cerebrovascular Surgery, Nashville, TN (2/2)
1999 Invited Speaker and Moderator, XKnife Radiosurgery Society Meeting, Sydney, Australia (2/23)
1999 Invited Lecturer, Panelist and Moderator, International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society 3rd Congress Meeting, Sydney, Australia (2/24-2/27)
1999 Invited Lecturer, Panelist and Moderator, 50th Anniversary of Neurosurgery in Egypt, Cairo, Egypt (3/9-3/12)
1999 Invited Lecturer, Panelist and Moderator, International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society 3rd Congress Meeting, Sydney, Australia (2/24-2/27)

1999 Invited Lecturer, Panelist and Moderator, Japanese Society of Skull Base Surgery / Conference on Neurosurgical Techniques and Tools, Osaka, Japan (3/22-25)
1999 Invited Lecturer, Practical Course, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, New Orleans, LA (4/24)
1999 Invited Lecturer, General Electric Intraoperative MR Symposium, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, New Orleans, LA (4/26)
1999 Invited Speaker, Breakfast Seminars, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, New Orleans, LA (4/27)
1999 Invited Lecturer and Moderator, New England Neurosurgical Society, Dedham, MA (6/11)
1999 Invited Lecturer, Panelist and Moderator, American Society of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Snowbird, UT (7/7-11)
1999 Invited Lecturer, Tumors of the Central Nervous System, Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education, Boston (9/14)
1999 Visiting Professor, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (10/1)
1999 Invited Lecturer, Neuroradiology, Head & Neck Radiology and Clinical Functional MRI and Spectroscopy, Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education, Boston (10/4)
1999 Invited Panelist, Practical Course, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Boston, MA (10/30-11/4)
1999 Invited Lecturer, Luncheon Discussion Groups, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Boston, MA (10/30-11/4)
1999 Invited Examiner, AANS Professional Development Course: Mock Oral Board Examination, Houston, TX (11/15-16)

2000 Invited Speaker, North American Skull Base Society, Phoenix, AZ (3/17-19)
2000 Invited Speaker, Practical Course, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, San Francisco, CA (4/9)
2000 Invited Speaker, Breakfast Seminars, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, San Francisco, CA (4/11)
2000 Invited Speaker, Society of University Neurosurgeons, Boston, MA (6/14-17)
2000 Invited Panelist, Practical Course, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, San Antonio, TX (9/23-28)
2000 Invited Lecturer, Luncheon Discussion Groups, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, San Antonio, TX (9/23-28)
2000 Invited Lecturer, Tumors of the Central Nervous System, Harvard Medical School, Department of Continuing Education, Boston (12/4)

2001 Invited Lecturer and Panelist, International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society 4th Congress Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada (6/10-13)

2004 Medical Grand Rounds, Melrose-Wakefield Hospital, Melrose, MA (10/20)
Our rights start deep within our humanity; they end where another's begin~~ SmileyJen
http://www.balancinginfluences.com

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smiileyjen101
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Re: The Dazzling Dark: A Non-Dual NDE

Post by smiileyjen101 » Thu Oct 04, 2012 7:54 am

I apologise for the long posts, outlining Dr Eben Alexander's credentials as a neuroscientist and neurosurgeon, I was happy to accept his say so on that, and his first hand account of a consciousness he believes is not and has not been answered by medicine and science and particularly neuroscience so far.
Awards and Honors:

1977 The Engel Society
1980 Alpha Omega Alpha
1982 Brody Scholar in the History of Neuroscience
1983 American College of Surgeons Scholarship
1985 R.M.P. Donaghy Prize in Neurosurgery, Quebec and New England Neurosurgical Societies
1985 Award for Best Resident Paper, New England Neurosurgical Society
1993 Elected to "Ten Outstanding Young Leaders" (TOYL) by Greater Boston Jaycees
1995-96 Who's Who Among Outstanding Americans
1997-99 Listed in "Best Doctors in America -- Northeast Region" Grant Support:
1996 Investigator, Brigham Surgical Group Research Grant, Rapid Rate Magnetic Cortical Stimulation for MR Cortical Mapping. $42,000 direct costs

Memberships, Offices and Committee Assignments in Professional Societies:

1980-present American Medical Association
1980-1987 North Carolina Medical Society
1980-1987 Durham-Orange Counties Medical Society
1983-2005 Massachusetts Medical Society
1983-2001 Suffolk County Medical Society
1988 Congress of Neurological Surgeons:
1987 General Scientific Session Committee
1988 Joint Committee on Education Self-assessment and Sponsorship SANS IV Committee
1989 Luncheon Seminars Committee, Poster Sessions Co-chairman, Sergeant-At-Arms Committee
1989-present American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery (ASSFN )
1993-1995 ASSFN Board of Directors
1989-present World Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery
1989-present Joint Section on Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons
1991-1992 Chairman, Resources Committee, Joint Section on Tumors, American Association of Neurological Surgeons and Congress of Neurological Surgeons
1991-1993 Self-Assessment for Neurological Surgery SANS V Committee
1991-1995 Stereotactic Radiosurgery Task Force Member, American Association of Neurological Surgeons
1991-1992 Chairman, Registration Committee, Congress of Neurological Surgeons
1992-1993 Chairman, Registration Committee, American Association of Neurological Surgeons
1992-1994 Joint Committee on Self-Assessment, AANS/CNS
1983-1987 Joint Committee on Continuing Medical Education, AANS/CNS
1992-1997 Chairman, Subcommittee on Education, Joint Section on Tumors, American Association of Neurological Surgeons and Congress of Neurological Surgeons
1992-1997 Executive Council, Joint Section on Tumors, American Association of Neurological Surgeons and Congress of Neurological Surgeons
1992-1995 Editor, World Directory of Neurological Surgeons (North American Edition), Congress of Neurological Surgeons
1993-2001 Affiliate Member, American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology
1994-1996 Executive Council, Joint Section on Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, American Association of Neurological Surgeons and Congress of Neurological Surgeons
1994-1995 Program Chairman, International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Meeting, Boston 1995
1994-1996 Chairman, Membership Committee, International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society
1994-1998 Member, Board of Directors, American Association of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery
1994 Scientific Program Committee, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, San Francisco, CA 1995
1997-1999 Chairman, Scientific Program Committee, International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Meeting, Sydney 1999
1997-1998 President, XKnife Radiosurgery Society

Editorial Boards:
1987-1993 Congress of Neurological Surgeons: Clinical Neurosurgery
1994-2003 Journal of Image Guided Surgery
1994-1999 Journal of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery
1994-2003 Ad Hoc Reviewer, Neurosurgery
1999-2000 Methods in Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

Major Research Interests:

1) Advances in 3-dimensional imaging capabilities for enhancement of intraoperative management of intracranial tumors and vascular lesions, including image fusion between CT, MRI and SPECT, magnetic stimulation preoperative cortical mapping, and the Intraoperative MRI (MR/T) Project with the General Electric Corporation

2) Development of technical advances in the use of stereotactic radiosurgery using a modified linear accelerator and the proton beam in the treatment of neoplastic, vascular and functional lesions in the central nervous system

3) MR-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery for the treatment of tumors (benign and malignant), clot dissolution in stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage, neuromodulation, creation of focal brain lesions, and precise targeted delivery of drugs and genes within the brain.

Principal Clinical and Hospital Service Responsibilities:
1988-2003 Attending neurosurgeon
2006-2007 Attending neurosurgeon

Teaching Experience:
1988-89 Neurobiology Course, Tutorial Leader, New Pathway, Harvard Medical School.
1988-93 Clinical Instructor, Physical Diagnosis Course, Second Year Medical Students, Harvard Medical School.
1988-93 Surgery Elective, Neurosurgery Didactic Sessions, Harvard Medical School.
1990 Invited Lecturer, Postgraduate Medical Series Neurosurgery Session, Brigham & Women's Hospital
1993 Thesis Review, Graduation with Honors Program, Harvard Medical School
1993 Invited Lecturer, Human Nervous System and Behavior, Harvard Medical School
Your turn Ash...
Our rights start deep within our humanity; they end where another's begin~~ SmileyJen
http://www.balancinginfluences.com

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