Spiritual Ego

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Spiritual Ego

Postby maaref » Fri Feb 17, 2017 10:01 am

I am just going to throw this out here.

The spiritual community seems to be full of seekers who are genuine and sincere in their approach but it seems they have been mislead along the way and now all they seek is not the truth but the experience that comes with knowing the truth. To them, feeling good, happy and blissful is the definition of awareness. These people proclaim they are awakened, but when they are kept in certain situation which may be inconvenience or just bad, they become judgmental, irritated and reject what is. In doing so, they suffer extremely to the point where they loss the feeling of happiness and bliss they are so attached to and fall into a patterned to restore the experience again until it disappears and so on over and over again.

I guess the point I am trying to make is that it is natural to suffer. It is natural to experience pain and sorrow when the experience is called for, but you should never feel attached, entangled and dependent on the experience no matter how "good" or "bad" it is. Awareness, simply put, is above all feelings, thoughts and objects. You are non-dual awareness (always have been, always will be) and as awareness you are experiencing awareness from awareness, in awareness and by awareness. This is a fact that you can do nothing about. As such, you should always have the foresight to act in alignment with awareness (your true nature) to the betterment of awareness (all that there is). We should embrace this knowledge and act in accordance with our intelligence and true nature as one; to love, help, support, do good and transcend our dependency on experiences, no matter their nature.

Probably I may get some criticism for this post. But I am humbly pointing to a matter which I believe has been grossly overlooked in the community for a long time to a point where I struggle to find anyone speaking about it in plain and clear terms.
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Re: Spiritual Ego

Postby dijmart » Sun Feb 19, 2017 4:12 am

Hi Maaref,

To them, feeling good, happy and blissful is the definition of awareness.


Its not my current definition of awareness, but I will admit there was a time that I "thought" this was the definition. This is because so many so called "enlightened" folks out there that are teaching portray it that way, so you can't really blame the spiritual seeker, as they don't know any better, until they come across a proper teaching. Most seekers are seeking to begin with to end their suffering, not unfold the truth. For me initially it was to end my suffering, then came the urge to know the truth also. I feel that is what lead me to Vedanta, as I had many unanswered questions prior to this teaching.
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Re: Spiritual Ego

Postby borris83 » Sun Feb 19, 2017 12:37 pm

Well, You can't define the ultimate reality in words, but the closest attempt to define the truth of oneself, is the term 'Satchitananda'... That is actually one of the main concepts of Vedanta.

Sat-Chit-Ananda is translated to Truth- Consiousness -Bliss..

So, bliss is a part of it, but not all.. The attributes of Brahman or reality is all these three: truth, consciousness and bliss..
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Re: Spiritual Ego

Postby DavidB » Tue Feb 21, 2017 5:12 am

For me initially it was to end my suffering, then came the urge to know the truth also.


Was the same for me. I guess it's probably the same for most of us. Eckhart talks about how after an intense period of suffering, he had a sudden transformation, which was subsequently followed up by years of discovering what had happened.
“Wisdom is knowing I am nothing, Love is knowing I am everything, and between the two my life moves.” ― Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
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Re: Spiritual Ego

Postby dijmart » Wed Feb 22, 2017 3:13 am

DavidB wrote:
For me initially it was to end my suffering, then came the urge to know the truth also.


Was the same for me. I guess it's probably the same for most of us. Eckhart talks about how after an intense period of suffering, he had a sudden transformation, which was subsequently followed up by years of discovering what had happened.


Yes, I've heard him talk about reading various spiritual literature to understand what happened, but also I think he had to "assimilate" the knowledge into daily life. Imo, Ramana did the same "assimilation", but did it in silence.
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Re: Spiritual Ego

Postby DavidB » Sat Mar 04, 2017 1:39 am

Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj's awakening came through a radical refusal to identify with any sense of self. A radical refusal to think of self in terms of this or that. Quite a different approach of that of Eckhart.

For myself, awakening has been a slow transformative process, interspersed with sudden helpful realizations. While Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj's negation is a more familiar approach, I find Eckhart's understanding of suffering, and explanations of the pain body and suffering, and his acceptance approach, are more deeply resonant.

I think of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, Jiddu Krishnamurti, Tony Parsons and Siddhartha Gautama etc, as the emptiness aspect of oneness, while Eckhart is more the fullness aspect of oneness. I think one needs to know both approaches to have a complete understanding of the nature of consciousness.

I remember Eckhart talking about the two approaches as the outward movement and the inward movement, or something like that.
“Wisdom is knowing I am nothing, Love is knowing I am everything, and between the two my life moves.” ― Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
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Re: Spiritual Ego

Postby dijmart » Sat Mar 04, 2017 4:13 am

Hi David,

Nice post! :)

Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj's awakening came through a radical refusal to identify with any sense of self. A radical refusal to think of self in terms of this or that. Quite a different approach of that of Eckhart.


Yes, Nisargadatta's teacher told him to focus/concentrate on "I AM" and he obeyed. I believe he says that in all his free time he just did what his teacher instructed and in 3 years he realized who/what he was. I wonder if that meant Self realization or enlightenment, as there is a difference.

Where as Tolle did no practice and was blessed with either Self realization or enlightenment from the get go. As he explains it ego just collapsed or separated, actually I can't remember the exact wordage :lol:



Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj's awakening came through a radical refusal to identify with any sense of self. A radical refusal to think of self in terms of this or that. Quite a different approach of that of Eckhart.

For myself, awakening has been a slow transformative process, interspersed with sudden helpful realizations. While Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj's negation is a more familiar approach


Yep, slow and steady! I have had a burning desire for freedom, which is the only thing that's kept me going. My suicide attempt in 2009 caused it. I could endure no more suffering in this life. The spiritual search is the only thing that kept me alive to be honest. I had my first mind blowing awaking in 2010. I knew then there was more to my existence then this small individual seperate self. The neti-neti inquiry was very helpful for me.

I find Eckhart's understanding of suffering, and explanations of the pain body and suffering, and his acceptance approach, are more deeply resonant.


I started with Tolle, actually with "ANE". Boy, was that a hard read for me as a beginner...WOW! Wish I would've read "PON" first. By the time I read "PON" it was child's play..lol. The issue I had eventially had with Tolle was that for whatever reason he only took me so far with my understanding. Which lead me to seek other teachers. Perhaps his focus on ego and pain body?? And I didn't see the pointing to what "I" was, my true nature "enough" for me to "get" it then (I see it now though, in his writing), Maybe because I was just a beginner? So, I went to other teachers... reading Nisargadatta, Ramana (they weren't proper teachers though), listening to Mooji, Adya, ect, etc....
I had my first true awakening to a lady who calls herself Ananta on youtube. She was doing direct Self inquiry with a fellow (she's done many since then) and at some point (I know exactly where) , my mind was fully "blown" for the first time. I literally couldn't think for like 10 minutes...lol...and I had a major realization.

I remember Eckhart talking about the two approaches as the outward movement and the inward movement, or something like that.


Absolutely! One cant stay in the outward movement forever. I think Nisargadatta acknowledges this when he says, " wisdom is knowing I'm no-thing, love is knowing I'm every-thing, in between my life moves". If one only stays in the outward movement they will not appreciate the realization and/or enlightenment they have in this life. Awakening and/or enlightenment is for the suffering mind, here and now.
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Re: Spiritual Ego

Postby Mystic » Sun Mar 05, 2017 7:32 am

We experience facts but perceptions of experiences are interpretations that hang like a darkened veil over the face of Christ.
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Re: Spiritual Ego

Postby DavidB » Mon Mar 13, 2017 12:00 am

1 Corinthians 13 New International Version (NIV)

13 If I speak in the tongues[a] of men or of angels, but do not have love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal. 2 If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing. 3 If I give all I possess to the poor and give over my body to hardship that I may boast,[b] but do not have love, I gain nothing.

4 Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. 5 It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. 6 Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. 7 It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.

8 Love never fails. But where there are prophecies, they will cease; where there are tongues, they will be stilled; where there is knowledge, it will pass away. 9 For we know in part and we prophesy in part, 10 but when completeness comes, what is in part disappears. 11 When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put the ways of childhood behind me. 12 For now we see only a reflection as in a mirror; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.

13 And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love.
“Wisdom is knowing I am nothing, Love is knowing I am everything, and between the two my life moves.” ― Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
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