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Do Fantasy and Mythology have anything to teach us

PostPosted: Sat Jul 22, 2017 5:08 am
by jtightlips21
Like Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, The Chronicles of Narnia, mythic series like Once Upon a Time, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Charmed, or Lost. Or even ancient myths from different parts of the world, and other different classical and modern forms of folklore

Re: Do Fantasy and Mythology have anything to teach us

PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2017 12:00 am
by Mystic
They say there is a moral to every story. Myths and legends were passed down through oral history then they were written down by scribes. Humans are natural story tellers. Movies and stories in books are very popular. Stories are symbolic, consisting of archetypes. For example, the story of Jesus is the story of enlightenment and spiritual awakening and the transcending of form. At first people may read the stories literally, then eventually the deeper mysteries that the stories point to may be revealed to the student.

Re: Do Fantasy and Mythology have anything to teach us

PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2017 5:50 pm
by jtightlips21
I have noticed that in most fantasies, there always seems to be some battle of good vs. evil. It seems like there is always a good and bad side. Yet I have wondered if that is only the surface meaning. I will admit that a fantasy would be awful boring if there was no good vs. evil. Yet at the same time, I have noticed for example in the Harry Potter series, many dualistic assumptions are challenged, such as racism(in the form of pure blood and half bloods, wizards and humanlike creatures like goblins, elves, centaurs, giants and werewolves). There are some similarities in Lord of the Rings, with the evil creatures being former good creatures, which if I am correct, Nazguls were former humans, Orcs former elves, and gollum a former hobbit. Yet there does seem to be some elements of prejudice, such as Dementors destined to be soul suckers, or trolls manufactured from Slime in Lord of the rings. So I see how in Fantasy they have a message of not judging by appearances, yet have a hard time with moral ambiguity, at least on the surface.