Trouble with stigma on suicide

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ajrob1985
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Trouble with stigma on suicide

Post by ajrob1985 » Wed May 23, 2018 12:01 pm

Hi

I'm looking for some guidance, I have been attending a Buddhism group for a while now and am becoming attracted to it's teachings however I find it's view on suicide very off putting. Unfortunately my farther committed suicide a number of years back which I have had major difficulties with. I'm struggling to believe in the view of Buddhism that this act will result in bad karma and only worsen his next life. Does anyone have any guidance to offer me on this, has Eckhart spoke of this previously?

Thanks

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jukai
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Re: Trouble with stigma on suicide

Post by jukai » Wed May 23, 2018 11:41 pm

Hi there, and welcome to the forum.

I wouldn't pay too much attention to what someone told you in the Buddhism group about the afterlife or "bad karma". If there is a next life, no one can predict what form it will take.

I think that beliefs like bad karma are simply the manifestations of people's many fears. Fear thrives on the imagined. I also think that the whole bad karma belief is meant as a deterrent to people - "If you commit sins in this life, you will suffer in the next." No one can back up such baseless claims. So, just don't believe it.

I have only heard Eckhart say very little about suicide (don't remember where). He said something to the effect of suicide being a rejection of life and hence an unconscious act.

My personal belief about suicide is - it is a reasonable way to end one's suffering and no one's business but the person concerned. I understand that your father hurt you and the rest of your family by his act, but his suffering has ceased. Be happy for him, if you can put aside your personal pain.

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Webwanderer
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Re: Trouble with stigma on suicide

Post by Webwanderer » Thu May 24, 2018 5:43 pm

ajrob1985 wrote:
Wed May 23, 2018 12:01 pm
Hi

I'm looking for some guidance, I have been attending a Buddhism group for a while now and am becoming attracted to it's teachings however I find it's view on suicide very off putting. Unfortunately my farther committed suicide a number of years back which I have had major difficulties with. I'm struggling to believe in the view of Buddhism that this act will result in bad karma and only worsen his next life. Does anyone have any guidance to offer me on this, has Eckhart spoke of this previously?

Thanks
Here's my take:

The aspect of the person who commits suicide is the ego's perspective of self and the nature of life. It can weave all kinds of tangled webs of belief that cause all sorts of pain. There is a larger reality however, that is the perspective of the larger self, the higher self, that essence of being that extends a part of itself into this human experience. That larger self is what determines the nature of any given human life context.

It is not our confused and pain stricken ego that determines future human experience. There may be unlearned lessons left unexplored, but it is not a Karmic punishment. If that were so, we would never escape the weight of our own ignorance. Goodness, pain begets pain and the ego piles on reasons to hurt ourselves and others. There is no way to balance the scales through a retributional karma.

Gleaning the lessons of life, however traumatic they seem, is doable from an infinitely loving Soul. Where there is no judgment, there is no punishment. That includes self-judgment if we are wise enough to cultivate an understanding of it in our own life.

If there is value in a challenging life, our fully aware larger being may choose it. From this human context we are too limited in our understanding to fully perceive it. We will eventually wake up to that greater awareness and choose what is in our evolutionary best interest for whatever life experiences we choose to explore.

Of course, in essence we are that fully aware larger being simply imagining that we are something else. Such is the nature of the human experience.

WW

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