Processing Trauma

A place for anything that doesn't fit into the existing forums
Post Reply
Redmoon
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jan 17, 2019 7:28 pm

Processing Trauma

Post by Redmoon » Sat Jan 19, 2019 2:47 pm

Hi

I am new to the forum and have been listening to Eckhart Tolle for around a year now and attempting to put some of this wisdom into practice.

One of the things that I feel I am struggling with is the proposition that its is futile to work through past pain or trauma. I am a therapist and I know there is much research there, including my own years of working with people and seeing the transformation that the brain needs to process trauma in order for it to move to the part of the brain that recognizes it has being in the past.

User avatar
Sighclone
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 6329
Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 6:22 pm

Re: Processing Trauma

Post by Sighclone » Sat Jan 19, 2019 6:27 pm

Welcome Redmoon!

There are conditions of ego and personality (conventionally known as the 'self' ) that benefit greatly from the many therapeutic modalities that have been developed and practiced in the last 110 years. Many nondual spiritual teachers recognize this and a number of them will send disturbed and stressed people to conventional counseling. There is some irony here in that it appears that a base level of comfort with "who you are" is required before you can "wake up," and essentially see past the former locked-in and limiting identity that ET refers to as the "ego."

Two fine books by counseling psychotherapists will help you understand the value of conventional counseling and how to incorporate that with your growing appreciation for nonduality: "In Touch" by John Prendergast and "Toward a Psychology of Awakening" by John Welwood. Welwood's book is out of print, but copies can be found on abebooks and he has a website: http://www.johnwelwood.com/ with delightful essays.

Amoda Maa's "Embodied Enlightenment" is also splendid.

Andy
A person is not a thing or a process, but an opening through which the universe manifests. - Martin Heidegger
There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present. - James Joyce

Redmoon
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jan 17, 2019 7:28 pm

Re: Processing Trauma

Post by Redmoon » Sun Jan 20, 2019 12:45 pm

Thanks Andy

I will take a look at the books that you recommend. I take your point about the ego but whilst there is ego I would think that there is a need for processing thought.

User avatar
Sighclone
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 6329
Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 6:22 pm

Re: Processing Trauma

Post by Sighclone » Sun Jan 20, 2019 6:41 pm

Redmoon -

What do you mean by "processing thought?"

Andy
A person is not a thing or a process, but an opening through which the universe manifests. - Martin Heidegger
There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present. - James Joyce

User avatar
turiya
Posts: 196
Joined: Sun Nov 27, 2016 11:14 pm
Location: CA

Re: Processing Trauma

Post by turiya » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:14 am

Redmoon wrote:
Sat Jan 19, 2019 2:47 pm
One of the things that I feel I am struggling with is the proposition that its is futile to work through past pain or trauma.
Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm not sure Eckhart (or any other spiritual teacher) has proposed that it's "futile" to work through past pain or trauma.

I think he (and others) have only suggested that it "isn't essential."

From The Power of Now:

"As you become more conscious of your present reality, you may suddenly get certain insights as to why your conditioning functions in particular ways; for example, why your relationships follow certain patterns, and you may remember things that happened in the past or see them more clearly. That is fine and can be helpful, but it is not essential. What is essential is your conscious presence."
“We ourselves are not an illusory part of Reality; rather are we Reality itself illusorily conceived.” - Wei Wu Wei

User avatar
turiya
Posts: 196
Joined: Sun Nov 27, 2016 11:14 pm
Location: CA

Re: Processing Trauma

Post by turiya » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:19 am

I watched this earlier today and found it interesting and helpful:

https://youtu.be/3GzXBbjCy70

:D
“We ourselves are not an illusory part of Reality; rather are we Reality itself illusorily conceived.” - Wei Wu Wei

EckerTolle
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat May 28, 2011 7:38 pm

Re: Processing Trauma

Post by EckerTolle » Sat Mar 09, 2019 8:02 pm

I am trying to let go of being in the hospital for years. I am in the future now with all kinds of high-tech going on.

Trauma literally means that you can't dream anymore. I feel you. I have to take meds to dream again, like veterans out of the war.

EckerTolle.

User avatar
smiileyjen101
Posts: 3739
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2010 3:44 am

Re: Processing Trauma

Post by smiileyjen101 » Sun Mar 10, 2019 1:23 am

I like how this thread has moved - there was one understanding of 'what happened' followed by a wider view of the 'situation', added to by a 'different perspective' and maybe the OP can feel a little easier about interpretations that were maybe tightly held, but maybe not seeing the 'all' of it.

Redmoon - isn't this sort of the same process that happens in counselling?

It's also what happens when you arrest assumptions built by ego, which is what ET proposes. So in time, one becomes used to not always believing the ego reaction as the be-all and end-all, even in trauma.

The space we put around our assumptions leaves room for presence. The ego holds too tight a view to allow that to happen. Even John Gottman, a valued counsellor, espouses the notion of holding this space for 'something happened'. What that 'something' is, may be different depending on perspective. Perspective moves across many levels of awareness, capacity and willingness to see all of them. I often use Gottman's notion to 'arrest' ego.

There are also slightly different perspectives (intensity of holding it) on what trauma is.
centerforanxietydisorders.com/what-is-trauma/
Sep 25, 2017 - In general, trauma can be defined as a psychological, emotional response to an event or an experience that is deeply distressing or disturbing.
Trauma is defined as a sudden, potentially deadly experience, often leaving lasting, troubling memories. Encyclopedia of Trauma, a multidisciplinary guide Edited by Charles R Figley
Both of these recognise, albeit a little differently, an event>response loop.

Ironically, I'm cited in the Encyclopedia of Trauma, for my perspective discussing elements of an event in a professional arena that has influence and impact (media attention on events).

Much of the suffering in trauma is arguing with the reality of it. Only the ego argues with reality. ET suggests when one is making enemy, obstacle or means to an end of a person, situation or thing, then ego is in control. He also says to look around and you'll see that this reaction is creating suffering for self and others around you (or involved in the 'something happened').

Through ET's work, and being non-judgmentally present in situations, one is more able to let go of the egoic notions of what things should, or shouldn't be, and find peace (even if only in the state of acceptance, it is what it is and there is much peace to be had in the acceptance of it) in the reality.

That doesn't mean not dealing with elements of it, it just means being aware/awake and doing that consciously. It means peacefully recognising our 'expectations' of what should or should not be, were never real, they were our imagining, believed to be real.

If we are led by the ego making enemy, obstacle, means to an end, we maintain the state of emergency, outside of the time of the emergency, and outside of our capacity.

Are counsellors helpful in this situation? Absolutely, if they too are awake.
Our rights start deep within our humanity; they end where another's begin~~ SmileyJen
http://www.balancinginfluences.com

Post Reply