Risk Taking and The Now

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L. Bryson
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Risk Taking and The Now

Post by L. Bryson » Tue Jan 10, 2006 6:31 am

I appriciate the info. on member status. Thank you. I wish to mention two films I have recently had the pleasure of watching. ( subject ). Both are wonderful expressions of every person/creatures unique journey.
"March of the Penguins" is absoloutly remarkable and precious. A must see.

" Grizzyman" is the bio. of Timothy Treadwell who spent 13 summers on Kodiak island Alaska studying and watching out for the brown bears.
His actions are quite controversial but I saw a spirited and dedicated soul. Troubled? Perhaps, but such sparkle! Retreating to nature humbled his psyche and allowed his spirit a full recovery from alcoholism where other treatments failed.

Regardless of his critics I loved the guy! One of a kind.
He was a risk taker and isn't that what it's all about?
Risking to open our hearts, retrain our minds, and be what we were intended?

Two thumbs up for thses two.


L.
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heidi
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Post by heidi » Tue Jan 10, 2006 2:50 pm

Hi L. - I changed the title to your post because I think you have started a topic about risk taking and the now, to which I will now contribute. :)

Risk taking is actually active surrender - when you consciously put your fate where it always is - in the hands of the universe. When we consciously enter into unknown territory, even if it's just having the courage to speak truth or end a relationship, we are removing some mindmade stuff that keeps us from nowness.

What say you?
Heidi
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Clare
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Post by Clare » Tue Jan 10, 2006 4:27 pm

It's helped a lot to read this thread this afternoon.

If I relate that to my personal experience, if I ask the question of myself "Is anything that happened to you recently something you actually controlled? Would you have chosen, consciously, to make that happen?" I come up with the answer "No." So if I am not controlling the turn of events in my life, then who is?

It's been a real test of presence. I have had a morning of looking back, and thinking(Ha) "why aren't things the way they were? I preferred it that way. I knew where I was with things then." And of course, with those thoughts comes discontent, pain body, unhappiness.

Things in my life are changing so rapidly and so much is leaving and ebbing away, if I look back, I'll only regret; if I look ahead, I'll just get scared, because it is a great and all-encompassing Unknown. But when I focus on the Now, I am all right, actually. In fact I am really all right very much indeed. I'm healthy, strong, alert, balanced, clear...which is more than I have been even on my very best days when clutching to Knowns for the past year or so.

So, just surrendering to it, understanding that it is not me who would have done things this way, so someone else must be in charge, and taking the risk of consciously willingly joyfully going with it, letting it happen, whatever it is. The only thing I can contribute is intention - and to me this is about working with what Is positively - seems to be the lesson here.

It's as if I've just pushed off on my skis going down the mountain. If I look back, I'll fall. If I look too much ahead, I'll get scared, and also miss the turns and paths that I need to use to get there safely. If I stay present, I am just on the skis going down the slope, just present in the rush and the slide and the crystalline beauty of everything.

I love the idea of studying animals in the wild, one of my dream things to do. So I'll catch up with that film. He sounds like an inspiration.

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Risk taking/ surrender

Post by L. Bryson » Tue Jan 10, 2006 6:20 pm

Hello Heidi & Claire,
I don't mind the title change at all. Good choice. Good comparision of risk taking really being about surrender. I have been involved in a seven yr. process of completly re-inventing my life choices and personal way of being.

The rewards have been immmense. Indiscribable. Once we surrender
ourselves, loosen the need to control outcome, the great wide open appears. I agree w/ ET that most of us need to reach a place of critical mass in our own suffering/ pain body before the awakenings take place.

Some will stay in the " duh" forever, some will explode in one " big bang" moment of consciousness. Some will cycle in and out forever.
I am currantly going into month seven of a self appointed sabbatical from
the "working " world. I am blessed financially to be able to do this but have disacoverd how hard it is to " undo" my programming of " go, do,
produce," and just be. My latest excercise in just being without the false comfort of an identity formed " out there."


I have discoverd that once we master our self imposed fears and pain
the " real" us begins to manifest what is exactly right for our continued growth. And yes... I have had to let go of many others along the way.
I see many who are still so invested in their suffering.
I would like to share a poem by the french poet Appollinaire....
I keep this in my wallet and credit it with a massive truth


" Come to the edge"

" It's too high"

" Come to the edge"

" We might fall "

" Come to the edge"

" And they came, and he pushed them, and they flew "



L. :)
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Clare
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Post by Clare » Thu Jan 12, 2006 12:41 am

As if by magic, this came through my snail mail box today. I am signed up with this gorgeous, ethical, creative bookseller. They put articles in their free magazine. This one just blew me away.

http://www.cygnus-books.co.uk/features/ ... chiner.htm

So, ya mean, it's not just me? I thought it was because I'm a virgo! :roll:
;)
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Post by heidi » Thu Jan 12, 2006 1:02 am

Thanks for that, Clare.
There are no coincidences.
Always been a divine child taking a wirlwind tour of this life.
Boldy going...,
Heidi
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Post by phil » Thu Jan 12, 2006 2:21 am

It is almost as though we need shaking out of our little boxes, our security and the things that we have clung onto as the 'known'.
After that beginning, the article goes on to create a new secure little box for us to cling to.
All your needs will be met – but only day by day'. If you look back over our lives these last few years, we will see that all our needs have always been met, day by day. This is not going to change.

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Post by Clare » Thu Jan 12, 2006 1:37 pm

I feel it's all in how you read the article, Phil.

To me, this speaks a big truth. All my needs have been met, just not in the ways I have expected. I read it as saying that we have to trust our needs will be met - this won't 'change', even if things are constantly changing and surprising us and not giving us what we think signifies that our needs are being met. Dropping expectation (forethought) is what I took away from it. The times when I've thought my needs have not been met is when I have done projected expectations. The article is saying to me to just drop that 'idea', and feel secure in the change, in the unexpected - hardly a secure little box.

What did that other great philisopher say? "You caiin't alwaaays get what you want....." You know the rest :)

But as I said, I guess it all depends on how you read the article, and what place each individual is at when they read it. I wasn't scrutinising it for faults, more astonished that it spoke of my experience so accurately. I'm sure Rosie's philosophy isn't perfect; she wrote it initially as a personal letter to the editors after they had announced in the previous magazine that they were facing financial ruin. They were so moved by her words they decided to publish them. I'm glad they did because they moved me too.

Love, Clare

Oh, and..... 'Live long and prosper', Heidi High Flier :)

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Post by phil » Thu Jan 12, 2006 3:13 pm

Hi Clare,

I could have been more clear. It seems I have the ability to obscure my meaning in either verbosity or conciseness. I'm multi-lingual!

I wasn't scrutinizing for faults, just trying to make a clear observation.
Clare wrote: Dropping expectation (forethought) is what I took away from it. The times when I've thought my needs have not been met is when I have done projected expectations.
The formula being offered here is, "if we drop expectations, our needs will be met."

I'm not arguing against this, in fact, I see value in this approach.

I was just pointing out that this formula is itself an expectation. Imho.

We're still projecting our needs and desires upon the moment, we've just adopted a different game plan.

I think having that game plan as an option in our toolbox is great.

It's just not accurate to label that tool "dropping expectations", as I see it.

Hmm, a middle ground between too many words, and not enough?

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Post by Clare » Thu Jan 12, 2006 3:29 pm

phil wrote: The formula being offered here is, "if we drop expectations, our needs will be met."
I can't speak for Rosie, but that was not what I got from it at all.

I didnt see any formula being offered. I felt it was saying that our needs will be met whether we expect them to be or not, we just can't control how. So, drop all 'formulas' too. Be in whatever is happening.

But , hey, this is what I gained from it. Respect to whatever you decide to take away, too. I suppose even if we find a loophole, or whatever, it defines and clarifies our individual experience, our beliefs. So, good luck to you. :)

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Post by phil » Thu Jan 12, 2006 4:20 pm

OK cool Clare. BTW, did you make the move to France?

Yes, we can all use the article as we wish, agreed.
Clare wrote: So, drop all 'formulas' too. Be in whatever is happening.
Drop all formulas, be whatever is happening.

Isn't this too a system, a method, a plan, that we bring to now in order to achieve some goal or another?

Are we using "be whatever is happening" to achieve some predetermined agenda such as finding peace?

Suppose that accepting now, just as it is, always made us miserable.

Would we still be interested in accepting now if we didn't get something out of it?

What does "accepting now" mean?

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Post by L. Bryson » Thu Jan 12, 2006 5:33 pm

" Accepting now" means..... training ourselves to not mentally salivate every time a bell rings. Even if the now is a miserable place for some to be in ,what alteraitive exists? Now is now. I think most people's bigger attatchment is to their past, or,... fear filled future projections.

They spend their " now" somewhere else.The only thing we get out of now IS now! And, if spending our now time means to be straining to be in the now, then we are still engaged in the salmon swimming upstream struggle.
Being in the now means " no struggle."


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Post by Clare » Thu Jan 12, 2006 5:57 pm

Hey Phil,

I'd be interested to know your own philosophy on this. What do you feel is the more lucid and true approach, or non approach, or whatever? Care to share?

Love, Clare

How you see it, L, is the way I understand it too. BTW.

Oh, and I'm not moving to france until April, thank goodness. I am sure I am going to need months more than that to have everything ready. But just trying to work day to day, in the moment, y'know. ..:) Today has been a bad day, hence playing hooky on here. I'm making a series of necessary complaints to a hire company that messed up something awful with our hire car, and reclaiming ourextra costs on our luggage. Not my favourite things to do :(

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Post by phil » Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:21 pm

L. Bryson wrote:Being in the now means "no struggle."
Hi L, nice to meet ya. OK, that sounds like a good definition.

Let's observe it together.

I'm sitting here. I have a choice of where to put my focus.

I can focus on the past. I can focus on the future. I can focus on now. 3 places for my awareness to go. My choice.

I observe myself examining these alternatives.

I recall past experiences I've had with each of these choices. I compare those experiences to each other. I re-taste these past experiences for a bit.

Having examined the past experiences, I observe myself picking one as the model of where I'd like to go next, in the future.

Perhaps I recall a state of "no struggle" I had once in the past while focusing on now, and I liked that experience, so I chose it again, for the future.

I observe myself projecting the past in to the future, just like always.

As I read Tolle, Krishnamurti and other similar teachers I observe myself being drawn forward in the teaching by all kinds of promises from the teachers, and expectations of my own creation. I observe I'm not alone in that.

I observe myself looking for now beyond these promises and expectations.

I observe it's time to stop being verbose. Over to your observations.


----
PS: Ha! This is funny. As I stop writing I wake up and observe what music is playing right now.

"Silence Ain't Golden Anymore" by the Allman Brothers.

I kid you not, true story! :-)

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Post by Clare » Thu Jan 12, 2006 7:38 pm

Hi Phil,

Sorry to say that I don't really experience things the way you describe them. Thanks for sharing your experience, though.It's interesting to see it from that perspective.

:)
Clare

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