Getting used to something

A place for anything that doesn't fit into the existing forums
User avatar
rachMiel
Posts: 2498
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 4:46 pm
Location: inner space
Contact:

Getting used to something

Post by rachMiel » Thu Mar 10, 2011 3:33 pm

Hi everyone. :-)

Something happens that causes your life to change. Could be as simple as a different schedule at work or as profound as the loss of a loved one. At first you are thrust into psycho-emotional chaos. Then, gradually, you adjust, get used to it, re-gain perspective and balance, re-stabilize.

What is the anatomy/physiology of this process of getting used to something?

Why does the getting-used-to sometimes happen very quickly, even for dramatic changes? Why does it sometimes take a long (long) time ... lifetimes perhaps? What actually changes in the getting-used-to process? Patterns/constellations of thought, memory? Is there a physical component to the change? Does the physical brain "get injured" and need time to heal? If so, what heals? WHO heals?

Who is it that undergoes the getting-used-to process? Is there a who? If not, is there anything that really does get used to something?

Would love to get your take on this. :-) Thanks!

rachMiel
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily ...

enigma
Posts: 1067
Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2009 4:51 am

Re: Getting used to something

Post by enigma » Fri Mar 11, 2011 7:22 am

It's most easily understood when it's seen that all of experience is the experience of movement only. That is, static states do not constitute experience, and so when something ceases to move, it fades from awareness. What I mean by movement is movement as perceived in consciousness, and so I mean change in perception. Even a physical movement, such as the rotating blades of a ceiling fan, or the rocking of a cradle, or a hum in the background, ceases to constitute change in consciousness after a short while. It becomes a kind of static, unnoticed movement, and a movement that is not noticed in consciousness is not an experience. On the other hand, a motionless object can constitute change as it's qualities are noticed or a story is constructed about it.

So we're talking about a movement in consciousness, and I'm suggesting that this is the totality of experience. As such, no matter how profound the experience, once it has ceased to change, it is no longer experienced and remains only as a comparative memory repeatedly activated, which itself tends to cease.

Once all such movement has ceased, one finds oneself precisely where they were before the movement began. Not more or less happy or contented. This means that all states are self normalizing. Movement ceases and one returns to the neutral point of one's subjective life. This also implies that sustained happy or depressed states are actually movements being continually created by the perceiver. One cannot naturally remain in any state but the neutral state, and this is not an experiential state, which is why the movement is continually restarted.

User avatar
rachMiel
Posts: 2498
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 4:46 pm
Location: inner space
Contact:

Re: Getting used to something

Post by rachMiel » Fri Mar 11, 2011 8:26 pm

rachMiel wrote:What is the anatomy/physiology of this process of getting used to something?
enigma wrote:... when something ceases to move, it fades from awareness. ... no matter how profound the experience, once it has ceased to change, it is no longer experienced ...
Thanks for the response, enigma. :-) Could you talk a bit more about what you mean by "moving" or "changing?"
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily ...

enigma
Posts: 1067
Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2009 4:51 am

Re: Getting used to something

Post by enigma » Sat Mar 12, 2011 4:55 am

The idea of change necessarily applies only to what is perceived in consciousness, since there isn't anything happening outside of Consciousness, so we're always talking about subjective change; change as perceived subjectively. This is determined largely by attention and interest. A lot of movement can be taking place around you, and you may be aware of it, but if it doesn't interest you it won't register as change. Again a noise in the background, if it goes on long enough, simply won't be noticed anymore. It won't register as a movement in consciousness and so subjectively nothing is happening. Perhaps yesterday there was no noise, and today there is, and yet the experience is precisely the same because the movement, for you, has ceased. The perception that something is happening is no longer there because you're no longer attending to it.

Likewise, you may fall in love, which is a powerful movement for you, but unless that movement continues in some way as a form of perceived change, it eventually fades and we say you fell out of love.

Not sure if that's what you were asking about.

User avatar
rachMiel
Posts: 2498
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 4:46 pm
Location: inner space
Contact:

Re: Getting used to something

Post by rachMiel » Sat Mar 12, 2011 8:47 pm

Thanks for the explanation.

What you're saying, if I understand correctly, is that "getting used to something" = reaching the point where one no longer registers that something as "changing."

What I'm wondering is: What is the mechanism -- physiological, psychological -- whereby one('s brain) reaches that point?
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily ...

enigma
Posts: 1067
Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2009 4:51 am

Re: Getting used to something

Post by enigma » Sat Mar 12, 2011 11:48 pm

Well, I'm saying there is ONLY the perception of change. There isn't some other kind of perception. This is why it's said that 'change is the only constant', though it may not be understood why this is so. I'm suggesting its more fundamental than psychology or brain function. Experience IS movement. Perception IS the perception of change. This is the function of Consciousness itself. We could say that You are Awareness, and Consciousness is Awareness in motion. Poetically, we could say life is God dancing in a mirror.

Examine what experience actually is, and I think you'll see what I mean. Experience is an event in time, recorded in memory. An event in time is a movement. You cannot have an experience of stillness itself, only the movement from motion to stillness or stillness to motion. All static states dissolve. Beingness cannot be experienced, nor can a constant state of joy or sorrow.

garuda
Posts: 367
Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2008 8:44 pm
Location: USA

Re: Getting used to something

Post by garuda » Sun Mar 13, 2011 12:36 am

enigma wrote: Beingness cannot be experienced, nor can a constant state of joy or sorrow.
If Consciousness was a constant and unchanging ground of Being… and if joy was a integral aspect of that Consciousness, could we say that only sorrow might be seen as just a temporary ripple on the (dimensionless) surface of the Consciousness?

Or are you emphasizing here that Beingness constitutes a "non-experience" experience at its deepest level?
Recognize present awareness......... rest in that awareness..........don’t become distracted.

User avatar
rachMiel
Posts: 2498
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 4:46 pm
Location: inner space
Contact:

Re: Getting used to something

Post by rachMiel » Sun Mar 13, 2011 12:39 am

Thanks, enigma. It's helpful to see a different perspective. :-)
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily ...

User avatar
rachMiel
Posts: 2498
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 4:46 pm
Location: inner space
Contact:

Re: Getting used to something

Post by rachMiel » Sun Mar 13, 2011 12:44 am

Anyone else have a take on how we "get used to" something? Or, perhaps a bit differently: how we "get over" something?
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily ...

enigma
Posts: 1067
Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2009 4:51 am

Re: Getting used to something

Post by enigma » Sun Mar 13, 2011 4:45 am

garuda wrote:
enigma wrote: Beingness cannot be experienced, nor can a constant state of joy or sorrow.
If Consciousness was a constant and unchanging ground of Being… and if joy was a integral aspect of that Consciousness, could we say that only sorrow might be seen as just a temporary ripple on the (dimensionless) surface of the Consciousness?


I don't mean to be picky, but this is where misunderstandings of language can be a major deal. I would use the word 'Awareness' instead of Consciousness, and I would differentiate between dualistic joy and nondual Joy, the latter being the unmodified stateless state of Beingness. As such, joy and sorrow are both temporary conditions in Consciousness, while Joy has no conditions.
Or are you emphasizing here that Beingness constitutes a "non-experience" experience at its deepest level?
I can't say Beingness is an experience at all, even an experienceless experience, whatever that would be. The deal is that something has been overlaid onto the Joy of Beingness, and this is called the mind states of joy and sorrow. These states must be transcended in order to realize that ground of Being, which is already here and not being realized due to that overlay.

And so nothing new becomes present that was not already present, and nothing that is presently experienced actually stops, but the experience is seen in a radically different way, perhaps analogous to the difference between a 'normal' dream and a lucid dream. The dream goes on, and yet it has been transcended in the realization that one is not the dream character but rather the dreamer, and he is quite safe in his bed.

User avatar
smiileyjen101
Posts: 3799
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2010 3:44 am

Re: Getting used to something

Post by smiileyjen101 » Sun Mar 13, 2011 5:43 am

Anyone else have a take on how we "get used to" something? Or, perhaps a bit differently: how we "get over" something?
I see it more as absorbing a (new/different) reality.

What was is no longer.
The adjustment is getting used to what now is or isn't.

In practical terms this is the opportunity where you may notice that your 'expectation' is different to your reality. The adjustment is the moving back into kilter the one or the other that is out of kilter (quite often expectation rather than reality as reality just is).

How we get used to it, may be a number of things, it may be at first trying to avoid or adjust or agitate against the reality through a variety of emotions - and then we learn through what it isn't that it's still there. Then eventually realising that resisting it only brings more suffering. Then we adjust to accommodate... ah... accommodate - make a place for - our reality (and I'm talking little r reality here) and hence we absorb it.

By taking it into us it is a part of us instead of the separateness that creates suffering.
Our rights start deep within our humanity; they end where another's begin~~ SmileyJen

enigma
Posts: 1067
Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2009 4:51 am

Re: Getting used to something

Post by enigma » Sun Mar 13, 2011 6:42 am

Why would one want to get used to happiness, and yet it's unavoidable.

User avatar
rachMiel
Posts: 2498
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 4:46 pm
Location: inner space
Contact:

Re: Getting used to something

Post by rachMiel » Sun Mar 13, 2011 6:58 am

smiileyjen101 wrote:I see it more as absorbing a (new/different) reality.
What was is no longer.
The adjustment is getting used to what now is or isn't.
Nice. :-) When you're present in NOW reality, getting used to and getting over happen automatically, without effort. So NOT getting over/used to something can be seen as a lapse in presence, yes?
Last edited by rachMiel on Sun Mar 13, 2011 7:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily ...

User avatar
rachMiel
Posts: 2498
Joined: Wed Feb 10, 2010 4:46 pm
Location: inner space
Contact:

Re: Getting used to something

Post by rachMiel » Sun Mar 13, 2011 7:17 am

I'm particularly interested in the brain-physiological processes involved in hanging onto or letting go of powerful experiences. Does emotional trauma "wound" the brain? Is this a wound that can heal? If so, does it heal like a cut heals? Or is brain healing a different physiological process?

( I realize this is kind of off topic for a Tolle forum, so I'd be happy to drop it if dropping it would be the right thing to do. Moderators, please let me know. )

Here are some things I found on the Web about trauma and brain physiology. There's lots more where these came from. I can't vouch for their accuracy.

"Our brains are sculpted by our early experiences. Maltreatment is a chisel that shapes a brain to contend with strife, but at the cost of deep, enduring wounds." - Teicher

"[Brain] scans reveal that trauma actually changes the structure and function of the brain, at the point where the frontal cortex, the emotional brain and the survival brain converge. A significant finding is that brain scans of people with relationship or developmental problems, learning problems, and social problems related to emotional intelligence reveal similar structural and functional irregularities as is the case resulting from PTSD." - from HealingResources.info

"Once viewed as genetically programmed, the brain is now known to be plastic, an organ molded by both genes and experience throughout life. A single traumatic experience can alter an adult's brain: A horrifying battle, for instance, may induce the flashbacks, depression and hair-trigger response of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). And researchers are finding that abuse and neglect early in life can have even more devastating consequences, tangling both the chemistry and the architecture of children's brains and leaving them at risk for drug abuse, teen pregnancy and psychiatric problems later in life." - US News and World Report, 1996
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily ...

User avatar
smiileyjen101
Posts: 3799
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2010 3:44 am

Re: Getting used to something

Post by smiileyjen101 » Sun Mar 13, 2011 7:53 am

So NOT getting over/used to something can be seen as a lapse in presence, yes?
Hmmmm. That would be definite maybe :lol:

What if the adjustment is needed in order to make changes to reality and therefore agitating rather than just accepting is the 'right' state of being in presence rather than a lapse of it.

But.. if in doubt, if there is a sense of acceptance, enjoyment or enthusiasm, and if the choices are being made in love, not fear, then NOT getting over / used to something can be present also. (hmmm... wanders off pondering that one..... :roll:)
Our rights start deep within our humanity; they end where another's begin~~ SmileyJen

Post Reply