Near Death Experience

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Near Death Experience

Postby Webwanderer » Tue Jan 06, 2009 2:46 pm

There is a great deal of information now available from those who have had Near Death Experiences (NDE). While most of it is interesting and moving and helps free us from fears of death, occasionally a report comes back from one who has gone far deeper into the realms beyond the physical than the the tunnel and meeting some departed loved ones. Nanci Danison was one such reportee. Mellen-Thomas is another. As a result of his awakening and his recognition of the greater reality, he came back not only with a new-found love for being human, but also loving nuclear bombs and rainforest deforestation (among other commonly hated threats). Read his account here to find out why. Beautiful.

http://www.mellen-thomas.com/stories.htm

WW
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Re: Near Death Experience

Postby Glycine » Tue Jan 06, 2009 4:09 pm

Thank you, WW - It's been more than 10 years since I last read about NDEs. Contemplating these experiences can be very captivating.
To me, his experience is compelling, but appears to have deep roots in the mind.
The only part I can really relate to is the feeling of void and connectedness (although I don't understand what it means and where it's coming from).
I'm looking forward to see how other forum members perceive the experience described by Thomas Mellen!
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Re: Near Death Experience

Postby doug » Sat Jan 24, 2009 7:29 pm

WOW! that Mellen-Thomas account is incredible!
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Re: Near Death Experience

Postby Webwanderer » Thu Dec 31, 2009 8:05 pm

I ran accross two YouTube dialogs from Nanci Danison. The first is a question and answer format on her NDE. The second is more direct telling of the story. Both are about an hour long and broken into six parts.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XxrSAnpoT6o&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFDI-jgFVqs&feature=related

Both are well worth the time to hear her story. Enjoy.

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Re: Near Death Experience

Postby Onceler » Thu Dec 31, 2009 8:41 pm

Thanks, WW. Brilliant.
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Re: Near Death Experience

Postby Onceler » Fri Jan 01, 2010 5:40 pm

I guess I need to read her book. I am confused by some things that she says, mainly that she wanted to help others see understand and perceive the reality that she saw after death and then she says that she would prefer not to know about her spirit-perception while she is in the body. She poses a real dichotomy between the body and soul. A dichotomy that doesn't really fit with the non-dual experience? Or is "awareness" simply another term for "oversoul" which is in turn a conduit to source?

She also looks like a completely different person between the two interviews, much more together and polished in the later one, but losing some of the immediacy and vulnerability shown in the first interview.

WW how do you see her experience interfacing with your non-dual experience?
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Re: Near Death Experience

Postby Webwanderer » Fri Jan 01, 2010 11:16 pm

Onceler wrote:WW how do you see her experience interfacing with your non-dual experience?

I find it quite helpful. Non-dual is less an experience than it is a fundamental reality. It is the dual that is an experience - one based upon a perception of separate identity through thought.

Danison's description of life beyond the physical, while difficult to put into the inadequacy of human words, indicated a resilient ability for independant thought, yet also an inherent ability to experience life from another being's perspective as if it were one's own - and in an ultimate sense it seems that it is One's own. The "higher" she(?) rose the more integrated with apparent others she became until all were absorded into Source.

As to her contradiction that she wanted to help others to see and understand the reality she saw, yet still held a preference not to remember as her soul self, her human perspective may be a bit confused. Or it may that both are true. On one hand the value of not remembering has implications for the richness of physical life experience not being overly influanced by the clear knowledge of a greater being, and on the other she has a mission that she came back to accomplish for which such memories are key.

She did say the she was glad that she did not remember clearly the fullness of the nature of being in the life beyond, which may be attributable to the limitations of the human brain.

The thing that I got most from her interview, that I am truly grateful for, is the clearer realizaition that the experience of the now moment cannot be judged upon its content, but rather one's appreciation for its richness and sensual nature. It matters less that it is pleasant or painful, and more its clarity and intimacy.

As I watch others in my life walking around doing what they do I get a clearer sense that they are just like me no matter the nature and details of what it is they are doing. How cool is that? I find myself less inclined to make thought stories about how right and wrong those doings and those others are. It's like I can see that we're all in this together whether some know it or not. I get a natural appreciation for others in recognition that who they appear to be, to themselves and others, is not remotely relevant to their true nature. Such a sense is more experiencial since Danison pointed out the perspective of souls being more interested in the richness of experience than its specific content.

It seems that the point of her mission is to help others see that the stuff of life in form is not related to judgment about content, but rather to its temporary nature in a realm of unique experience. While full recognition as our soul consciousness in form may be counter productive to a degree, a fundamental understanding of what's important and why, is transformative to the human experience.

Thanks Onceler for you insightful questions. They helped me look deeper into Danison's message. Some of this "enlightened" perspective has been floating around on the fringes of my perception. I am trying to integrate it, but it's a bit illusive to this human analysis. Thanks also to Candice O'Denver for her Short Moments teachings. It is in such moments that the clarity of Danison's pointers are seen best.

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Re: Near Death Experience

Postby Onceler » Sat Jan 02, 2010 4:48 pm

Webwanderer wrote:
The thing that I got most from her interview, that I am truly grateful for, is the clearer realizaition that the experience of the now moment cannot be judged upon its content, but rather one's appreciation for its richness and sensual nature. It matters less that it is pleasant or painful, and more its clarity and intimacy.

Yes, I was reading in New Earth last night where Tolle says that we must embrace the now mainly because it is so complex, that even though it may look "bad" from that human perspective, the events unfolding have such deep connections and complex reverberations that we can't possibly know the full impact (with our human mind), but must just align with it.

As I watch others in my life walking around doing what they do I get a clearer sense that they are just like me no matter the nature and details of what it is they are doing. How cool is that? I find myself less inclined to make thought stories about how right and wrong those doings and those others are.

It's like I can see that we're all in this together whether some know it or not. I get a natural appreciation for others in recognition that who they appear to be, to themselves and others, is not remotely relevant to their true nature. Such a sense is more experiencial since Danison pointed out the perspective of souls being more interested in the richness of experience than its specific content.
WW


Yes! Thanks for your response, WW. That helps to integrate things a bit more for me. I guess my question is what do we do with all this info, now. I think my answer is to lean into awareness (light?) and trust it as much as I can and realize all the other stuff is just the human bodies response....not unimportant, certainly, but not to be trusted as fully as awareness.
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Re: Near Death Experience

Postby Onceler » Sat Jan 02, 2010 4:49 pm

Webwanderer wrote:
The thing that I got most from her interview, that I am truly grateful for, is the clearer realizaition that the experience of the now moment cannot be judged upon its content, but rather one's appreciation for its richness and sensual nature. It matters less that it is pleasant or painful, and more its clarity and intimacy.

As I watch others in my life walking around doing what they do I get a clearer sense that they are just like me no matter the nature and details of what it is they are doing. How cool is that? I find myself less inclined to make thought stories about how right and wrong those doings and those others are.

It's like I can see that we're all in this together whether some know it or not. I get a natural appreciation for others in recognition that who they appear to be, to themselves and others, is not remotely relevant to their true nature. Such a sense is more experiencial since Danison pointed out the perspective of souls being more interested in the richness of experience than its specific content.
WW


Yes! Thanks for your response, WW. That helps to integrate things a bit more for me. I guess my question is what do we do with all this info, now. I think my answer is to lean into awareness (light?) and trust it as much as I can and realize all the other stuff is just the human bodies response....not unimportant, certainly, but not to be trusted as fully as awareness.
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Re: Near Death Experience

Postby smiileyjen101 » Thu Sep 23, 2010 5:52 am

[quote="Webwanderer The thing that I got most from her interview, that I am truly grateful for, is the clearer realizaition that the experience of the now moment cannot be judged upon its content, but rather one's appreciation for its richness and sensual nature. It matters less that it is pleasant or painful, and more its clarity and intimacy.

As I watch others in my life walking around doing what they do I get a clearer sense that they are just like me no matter the nature and details of what it is they are doing. How cool is that? I find myself less inclined to make thought stories about how right and wrong those doings and those others are. It's like I can see that we're all in this together whether some know it or not. I get a natural appreciation for others in recognition that who they appear to be, to themselves and others, is not remotely relevant to their true nature. Such a sense is more experiencial since Danison pointed out the perspective of souls being more interested in the richness of experience than its specific content.

It seems that the point of her mission is to help others see that the stuff of life in form is not related to judgment about content, but rather to its temporary nature in a realm of unique experience. While full recognition as our soul consciousness in form may be counter productive to a degree, a fundamental understanding of what's important and why, is transformative to the human experience. WW
[/quote]

I haven't clicked on the link yet, but love what you've taken from it WW.

Not long ago I participated in a program for NDE - hmm - graduates (?) returnees (?) veterans (?) lol!!! It was a trial programme to see if this sense of 'mission' and re-entry retained information could be dissected and taught to non- NDE (insert whichever from above). It was incredible, both in the sense that it allowed interaction between (whichever) and instead of starting at a basis of trying to rationalise the experience out of existence, building on and from the experience and knowledge gained.


I'm newly poking my head in here but would like to jump across to a thought I had while reading responses to your initial intro to this section. I welcome
and contribute to scientific efforts in this area because there is soooooooo much to be learned from it

I wholeheartedly wish science would catch up. Each time I start to read an account that may 'explain' it it's like there's pieces of it missing.

can only describe the feeling as if someone cooked apple pie and told you that's how your granny's apple pie was cooked and tasted - but some of the ingredients have been missed but you don't know what they were
- how can you explain your granny's apple pie to someone who's never tasted it?
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Re: Near Death Experience

Postby tikey » Sun Oct 10, 2010 7:31 pm

Amazing. I really enjoyed this.
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Re: Near Death Experience

Postby smiileyjen101 » Fri Mar 09, 2012 6:48 am

I was a little unsure where to post this, Carolyn Matthews, the originator of the course I mentioned above re Mission statements has been back in touch as she's about to release a CD on the course and is also writing a book.

This from her website on the topic may be interesting as an overview
Significance of NDEs
For positive NDEs, experiencers believe they have been sent back to physical life to complete the mission that they had promised to complete. We all have a mission in life, but NDErs have had a wake-up call. Many feel an urgent need to know and manifest their mission.

The NDE is a significant event which emphasizes the need to carry out the soul's mission. It gives NDErs a heightened sense of awareness, and an enhanced sensitivity to their environment and the people in it. It offers a look at the Big Picture, with unconditional love. Many NDErs have transpersonal gifts or talents such as clairsentience, clairvoyance, precognition, telepathy, empathy, healing, a sense of uncoditional love, and unity with the "All." Everything in Nature is connected. The NDE also gives experiencers a lack of fear of death.

For distressing NDEs (DNDEs), the experiencer is negative and experiencers may have a fear of death. This applies to children as well as adults, and there is as yet no known cause as to why some people have a positive NDE and others have a negative NDE.

Whether positive or negative, NDErs have a difficult time adjusting to everyday life after the event. Some take years to process the experience and how it has changed them. Acceptance and validation of the NDE from others are two more of their challenges.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.ndemission.com/index.html

Having completed the course as one of her guinea pigs I can say it brought clarity to a lot of life areas. I'm pretty sure it would be as helpful to anyone, nde'er or not.
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