San do kai, Identity of relative and absolute.

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Mason
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Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2007 9:50 am
Location: The Present.

San do kai, Identity of relative and absolute.

Post by Mason » Tue May 06, 2008 7:48 am

I was listening to one of Adyashanti's recent satsangs and he said that his teacher often used to say that "you have a better chance of finding water if you dig one well that is 100 feet deep than you would if you dug 100 wells which are each 1 foot deep ...Same amount of work, 100 feet worth of digging, but a better result if you do it all in the same spot" :wink:

In many ways I am new to all this "spiritual" stuff but in my brief survey the spiritual landscape it is my earnest feeling that one of the best places to sink a well might be into that which is pointed at by the words of Sekito Kisen's eighth-century poem "Identity of Relative and Absolute"

Here's the text:

http://www.zenonmain.org/Identity.html
Last edited by Mason on Mon May 19, 2008 8:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Mason
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2007 9:50 am
Location: The Present.

Both, and...

Post by Mason » Mon May 12, 2008 1:56 am

In my being, I keep returning to the San do kai over-and-over, so it's only natural to post again. :wink:

Adyashanti gave a sublime lecture about San do kai at his Silent Retreat at Asilomar in Dec 07. He mentioned that the poem is chanted 3 times a day in Zen Monasteries throughout the world.

I am relieved to realize that the world as I imagined it doesn't actually exist, and I appreciate being present and in the now. But wow, what the San do kai points to...

To be attached to things is an illusion;
To encounter the absolute is not yet enlightenment.


As Adya explained it, the San do kai paints presence [the absolute], not as enlightenment, but rather as the other (seldom realized) side of duality. In his lecture Adya really struck a deep chord when he said "...the World of Form and the Absolute are two sides of duality, enlightenment is not 'either or', enlightenment is 'both, and'" he repeated "...enlightenment is 'both, and'"

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