What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by RCharles » Mon May 03, 2010 7:04 am

Andy, your warning is so very wise. Jesus told his disciples to be as wise as serpents and harmless as doves for exactly the reasons you cite. Being present doesn't make all the evil games go away, but we are in a better place for dealing with them. We can confront when there is no other course, but we can do so without getting so ego-involved in the confrontation. We can also choose to let the games pass us by while we just continue doing the job joyfully in the present.

Runstrails offered some really great insights too, so good that they are worth repeating: "
"Fear" is the most dominant ego trait in theworkplace (fear of not producing, fear of getting fired, fear of not getting that promotion, fear of what your boss will think, fear of not getting that raise, fear of someone else 'scooping' you).

Luckily the more you can see fear for what it is (an illusion), the more it dissipates. So, bringing in more presence at work is really the best solution.

Being present at work means slowing down, taking time out to breathe, not spending so much time at work, not chasing yet another crazy deadline, producing quality and not quantity--none of which is really valued in the modern workplace.
That really expresses how I have been approaching my work for the past two years, since I discovered Eckhart. It has been helping me tremendously to grow in appreciation of my job and my coworkers and to let go of the petty issues, the anxiety, the overtime rat-maze caused by fear that I'm not producing enough. Much of the time I am able to work sanely at long last, and it's a great feeling.

I'll still admit that I'd rather be independently wealthy than have to face the tribulations at work each day, but if it were not for work, my spiritual progress would have come much more slowly. So there is much to be thankful for, and I am especially thankful that slowing down, breathing, and trying to produce quality rather than a hurried quantity has not harmed my status at work and may even be enhancing it. That's an unexpected reward.

BTW, I am finding this thread tremendously helpful and affirming. We seem to have the same troubles at work, and it's affirming to see that presence works in the employment realm too. Thank you all for your insights on this topic.

RC
"They are all...perfect..." --Ken Watanabe, dying scene in the movie The Last Samurai

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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by Sighclone » Mon May 03, 2010 6:31 pm

Kind words as always, RC. Fear is very real. But only to the ego, which is false. :)

Andy
A person is not a thing or a process, but an opening through which the universe manifests. - Martin Heidegger
There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present. - James Joyce

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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by surprise » Mon May 17, 2010 11:10 am

Very very interesting topic. Few things from my side..


Sighclone wrote:Egoic people sometimes sabotage work of others which they perceive as threats. As you innocently do your job, others may plot against you. That's just how egos work, and waking up doesn't necessarily mean allowing that to happen.
Andy
Generally every individual sees it from their point of view. What we think as good work getting spoiled might be a bad execution getting stopped from other person angle. For others its a ploy from our side. Speak Truth, explain your point of view without hurting others, remaining mute for 50-50 discussions will handle the problem on its own. Do not worry about the results.
Sighclone wrote: All this might sound very fearful and paranoid...and not nondual. However, the world stage is full of duality, and to do something less is denying real forces working around you, and is actually not living in the present, but some fantasy version of it. Of course, you have the option of just letting the universe work, and allowing the sabotage to go unchecked. It could mean you lose your job, and, like Eckhart, sit on a park bench for two years. I'm not saying that is bad. I am saying that there are real-world games that exist, and you have a choice in how you respond to them.
Andy
Its the other persons ego does this. Is it not good to look through the ego in others? Its not letting the sabotage left unchecked, it has to get highlighted at right time in a polite manner. Whether that gets effected or not is not within our control. Irrespective of the results we need to accept it. The highlighted part seems to be an extreme situation for me

Edit:

http://www.morebusiness.com/running_you ... d-5124.brc

Our ego can get in the way of marketing our business. From our need to be right, to talking about ourselves incessantly; coming from an attitude of arrogance to getting attached to the outcomes of what we do, these are just some of the ways our ego can get in our way.

If it's all about us, then it isn't about our customers. It's imperative that we are aware of how we conduct ourselves and the impact it may be having on our success.

Our ego, however, can serve us as well. Our ego can help us in setting boundaries and standards of performance. It can give us the confidence to know we can make a positive difference for our clients. If we can't believe in what we do, no one else will.

Ego, in a healthy way, is about playing to our strengths and not to our weaknesses. How can we step away from our ego and market our business more effectively?

1. Maintain an open mind. When we come from a place of ego, we tend to be narrowly scoped. Usually we have difficulty seeing beyond what we can understand. We think we know the only way, that we have all of the answers. Business success, however, demands that we see the bigger picture. We must be open to new ideas, trends, opinions, and most importantly, to the variety of potential customers or clients with whom we'll undoubtedly interface. An open perspective may lead us to developing new and innovative products or programs. It may allow us to seek out others who we might otherwise dismiss, possibly creating the opportunity for strategic business alliances or partnerships. An open mind opens us up to opportunities.

2. Listen more than you speak. It's been said that we were given two ears and one mouth so that we could listen twice as much as we speak. While there is definitely merit to this statement, it really goes one step deeper. Almost every single time we speak, we are speaking from a place of ego. We are talking about ourselves, something we saw, something we did, something we have an opinion about. While that is all good and fine, when it comes to business we need to make some adjustments. Business is about serving the needs of others, specifically your target market. It's all about them. To be successful, you need to listen to what they say. What are their biggest problems, needs, and desires? What are they looking for you to do for them? How can your products or services solve their problems? The only way to determine that is by listening closely and carefully. When you speak, come from a place of inquiry and curiosity. And, make sure that everything you speak about relates back to the client in some way.

3. Serve others instead of ourselves. Most of us are in business to make money. That end is worthy and necessary to meet our goal of making a living. But, in order to create a successful business our orientation must be from the standpoint of serving others. It is by serving others that we serve ourselves. Of all of the business blunders, this is probably the one that leads the way to slow growth or to eventual business failure. Each day, we need to evaluate our activities. Certainly we must handle various administrative and operational tasks for our business. But, aside from these, all other activities need to be focused around serving our clients. Ask yourself the question: Is what I'm doing serving or going to serve the needs and requirements of my clientele? If the answer is "no", re-evaluate why you are doing it. You may be wasting time, money, and energy pursuing activities that will have no value. Orient everything you do around serving others and you'll naturally end up serving yourself as well.

4. Practice humility. Humility or the state of being humble is an absolute must in business. For no matter what we do in life, there will always be times when we cannot control what is happening around us or to us. By developing an attitude of gratitude and being thankful in the moment for things going well, we'll be able to weather the storm much better when things go awry. Practicing humility means that we must face our own failures and imperfections. It also means that we must know our place when it comes to dealing with others - that we must treat others as we would like to be treated. It demands that we set aside our ego and realize that we are no better and no worse than anyone else; that we are on our own path that is unique to us and for us. There is no place for ego in a humble heart.

5. Don't get attached to outcomes. Being attached to outcomes is a surefire path to disappointment and a waste of our mental energies. It is our ego that fuels our intense desire to create specific outcomes. And, just like clockwork, this type of attitude leads to disappointment when the desired outcome fails to manifest. No one can control the outcome of a situation. All we can do is make decisions, based on the best data possible. There are a myriad of intervening circumstances that can derail even the best of plans. For this reason, it's important to set aside our egos and understand we only have so much power to steer our course. We need to develop a sense of peace that we have made the best decisions based upon what we know and leave it at that.

6. Avoid perfection. A big ego usually accompanies an attitude that everything has to be perfect. Perfect is an impossible idealism that keeps people from moving forward and accomplishing all that they can. Perfection will prevent you from giving a speech because you don't think its good enough. Perfection will stop you from writing a book, making a phone call to a prospect, or presenting a teleclass on a topic you love. Don't let this unproductive attitude invade your life. It's rooted in ego - a need to be right, a need to be better than others and beyond reproach. Ironically, most people are not drawn to perfectionists, as they are often perceived as uptight, unrealistic, and better than everyone else. Your clients will be drawn to you because of who you are -- failures, mistakes, and imperfections - the whole nine yards. People will seek you out because you are a real person - someone they can identify with. Don't let perfection stand in the way of being who you are.

7. Make mistakes. Mistakes are a part of life. And really, there are no mistakes; there are only experiences. Experiences provide us with feedback that allows us to make other decisions that lead us towards what we want to accomplish. If we aren't willing to have experiences, we aren't going to have a life or a business for that matter. A big ego will often prevent us from having experiences because it perceives that a "mistake" is a bad thing and a sign of failure. The funny thing about this is that you're probably the only one who notices the mistake, as other folks are much too busy being concerned with their own lives. Get out of yourself, shed your ego and start living. The most successful business owners are the ones who step out, have experiences and fail their way to success.

8. Be right, not righteous. There's a big difference between being right and being righteous. Being righteous is all about your ego. You think that you have a monopoly on "right"; that you know and have all the answers, and that everyone who does not believe as you do is wrong. Righteous folks are frightened folks. Often they are raised on fear-based ideas put forth by otherwise well-meaning parents or institutions. They are wrapped up in their own world, unaware of other people. They don't know how to respect others because they themselves harbor nothing worthy of respect. After all it's ludicrous to believe anyone has a monopoly on truth or what is right. Still, however, you may see this creeping into your own approach to business. Whenever you feel the need to express righteousness, know that it's your ego rearing its ugly head.

9. Consult others. Seeking out counsel, information, wisdom, or feedback from others is a wonderful way to bring creativity, inspiration, and motivation to all that you do. If your ego were in play, you wouldn't even consider such a thing. Ego is all about you. You don't have a place for others, their ideas, or their feedback. Business is all about interfacing with others, from your colleagues, to your vendors and supplies, to your all important customers or clients. Just like with the idea of "having an open mind", tremendous opportunity can come your way by consulting with others. Don't close down the doors to success. Instead, open them wide by setting aside your ego and connecting with others.

10. Let others tell your story. Why not completely take you and your ego out of the picture and let others speak for you. Testimonials and referrals are, by the far, the most powerful tools you can use to build your business. People relate to the stories that others tell them. They hold much more credibility than if you were to talk about yourself and your client successes. Actively gather testimonials from the folks you do business with. Make sure to include a few of them in your various marketing materials. Post them to your website for everyone to view and read. If someone says wonderful things about you but is uncomfortable writing a testimonial, offer to transcribe what they tell you and then send it to them for final approval.

© Copyright 2004 by Alicia Smith Alicia Smith is a Coach and Trainer whose specialty is helping coaches to Make Money Now. This article is derived from just one of the 90 lessons contained in her e-course, 90-Day Marketing Marathon.

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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by runstrails » Mon May 17, 2010 4:25 pm

Surprise,
Thanks for this article. I think there are many valuable tips in here.

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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by Sighclone » Mon May 17, 2010 10:39 pm

Very good article -- thanks, surprise!

Andy
A person is not a thing or a process, but an opening through which the universe manifests. - Martin Heidegger
There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present. - James Joyce

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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by great2be » Sun Jun 06, 2010 10:34 am

When the ego illusion bubble bursts, then the amount of money required becomes far less than you might imagine.

Just look at the money you spend and see how much is spent on vanity and entertainment.
The need for expensive living totally disappears and simplicity replaces it.

One's source of income also mutates until it is pure and unsullied by commercialism and waste.
Can you really imagine that one free from illusion would continue to feed the serpent of modern capitalism?

Most of the 'New Age' business information being sold is just a targetting of a new emerging market by people who still fear the future and want more money to insulate them.
An imaginary seeker, seeking an imaginary goal.
Realise the nature of imagination and the fallacious effort ends.

Have you ever seen a dog chasing it's tail?

What happens when the dog runs faster?

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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by Sighclone » Mon Jun 07, 2010 5:04 pm

One's source of income also mutates until it is pure and unsullied by commercialism and waste.
Interesting point here...I do not disagree at all. But could you give us some concrete examples?

Thanks,

Andy
A person is not a thing or a process, but an opening through which the universe manifests. - Martin Heidegger
There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present. - James Joyce

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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by great2be » Tue Jun 08, 2010 11:22 am

Well Andy
Why not start with food, clothing & shelter?
These are necessities in life, and one can service any of these requirements.
Then there's health care.
Then there's education.
Etc. etc.

Any of these can be serviced, and if the motive is love, then you will find that what's offered is offered with care & compassion and will just so happen to be sustainable too.
An imaginary seeker, seeking an imaginary goal.
Realise the nature of imagination and the fallacious effort ends.

Have you ever seen a dog chasing it's tail?

What happens when the dog runs faster?

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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by Sighclone » Tue Jun 08, 2010 7:13 pm

g2b -

I guess I'm hearing you say that working in those service areas is preferable to say, working in an investment bank. I'm not at all disagreeing. But are you also saying that opportunities in those areas will appear? And do you have concrete examples of that happening ("I used to be a stock broker and now I sell vegetables or work in a nursing home," etc...)

Andy
A person is not a thing or a process, but an opening through which the universe manifests. - Martin Heidegger
There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present. - James Joyce

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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by great2be » Sat Jun 26, 2010 2:57 pm

There's a whole spectrum of ways to make income in this world, with torturer at one end and nurse somewhere near the other end. It's all about sensitivity, and that will make the choices for you.

When one is free from fear then the options available increase dramatically, I've never found a shortage of opportunities.

Why do you ask for concrete examples? When there's no fear, the whole world is your oyster. No truly free life will ever mirror another, so examples from my life will not be relevant to another.
An imaginary seeker, seeking an imaginary goal.
Realise the nature of imagination and the fallacious effort ends.

Have you ever seen a dog chasing it's tail?

What happens when the dog runs faster?

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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by snowheight » Sun Jun 27, 2010 5:40 am

great2be wrote:There's a whole spectrum of ways to make income in this world, with torturer at one end and nurse somewhere near the other end.
From multiple sources I've heard the wisdom that it is not what one does, but how one does it that matters.

The observation above reminds me of "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest". Can't think of an analogous character on the other side of the spectrum offhand.

Namaste,

snowheight
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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by great2be » Sun Jun 27, 2010 1:33 pm

snowheight wrote: From multiple sources I've heard the wisdom that it is not what one does, but how one does it that matters.
Would you care to apply this secondhand wisdom to the profession of torturer and let me know what you come up with?
An imaginary seeker, seeking an imaginary goal.
Realise the nature of imagination and the fallacious effort ends.

Have you ever seen a dog chasing it's tail?

What happens when the dog runs faster?

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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by snowheight » Sun Jun 27, 2010 10:44 pm

great2be wrote:
snowheight wrote: From multiple sources I've heard the wisdom that it is not what one does, but how one does it that matters.
Would you care to apply this secondhand wisdom to the profession of torturer and let me know what you come up with?
There is no way to torture someone that fits into the context of that idea that I can imagine. But then again, I wouldn't describe "torturer" as a "profession" any more than I would thief, rapist or murderer. What was Bernie Madoff's profession?

A different way to support your original thesis:
great2be wrote:There's a whole spectrum of ways to make income in this world, with torturer at one end and nurse somewhere near the other end. It's all about sensitivity, and that will make the choices for you.
in the face the second-hand wisdom would be to observe that most people must make money to survive, and it is HOW they do the earning that matters. The how is related to the what -- the two are not completely independent, the two are not the same.

A good nurse needs a uniform, shoes, bedpans, bandages, simple medicines, clean hot and cold running water and hopefully works in a clean, climate-controlled building designed with wide hallways and elevators. There are dozens of different occupations and even whole sub-economies required to achieve the ends of a modern nurse.

I'm reminded of a conversation with my college roomate years ago. He expressed the view that we should all just live as the "first" Americans did as they were found by European explorer's 500+ years ago. I responded with a question: how many people do you think the continent could support with that way of life? If you accept the inevitable conclusion that the number is far fewer than 250 million, and still stick to my roommates assertion, you might be led down a system of troubling pathways that the world has seen tread to terrible ends in recent history.

Here is a question for you: do you perceive the same sort of value-based spectrum that you initially described within the constraints of activity that is currently legal in the given jurisdiction in which the potential worker or business person resides?

Namaste,

snowheight
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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by great2be » Mon Jun 28, 2010 4:18 pm

snowheight wrote:
great2be wrote:
snowheight wrote: From multiple sources I've heard the wisdom that it is not what one does, but how one does it that matters.
Would you care to apply this secondhand wisdom to the profession of torturer and let me know what you come up with?
There is no way to torture someone that fits into the context of that idea that I can imagine. But then again, I wouldn't describe "torturer" as a "profession" any more than I would thief, rapist or murderer. What was Bernie Madoff's profession?
Torturers are paid to do their work in Guantanamo and hundreds of other locations all around the world.
snowheight wrote:Here is a question for you: do you perceive the same sort of value-based spectrum that you initially described within the constraints of activity that is currently legal in the given jurisdiction in which the potential worker or business person resides?
Do your write legal documents for a living? :lol:
It's always possible to do work that causes no injury to people or planet. When one is awake and free from suffering then a great intelligence is available and there is no shortage of opportunity.
An imaginary seeker, seeking an imaginary goal.
Realise the nature of imagination and the fallacious effort ends.

Have you ever seen a dog chasing it's tail?

What happens when the dog runs faster?

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Re: What will work life look like when we leave the ego at home?

Post by Sighclone » Mon Jun 28, 2010 5:36 pm

great -

The only reason I asked for concrete examples is to encourage you to fortify your abstract assertion with hard data, from your life or others'. All positions, even those which may appear to be self-evident, are strengthened by example.

The following comment is controversal. If offended, please review a few of my other posts before labelling me a lunatic.

How many innocent lives have been saved by information received from torture techniques? That question is unanswerable, of course, but ultimately, the human race is a transient species in form. (Recall Eckhart's CD "Even the Sun will Die.")Eckhart talks at length, with anger and sadness, about the loss of 200 million lives in the twentieth century due to war. Maybe a few more tortured individuals would have reduced that number. Perhaps even torture can have ultimate compassionate results.

Andy
A person is not a thing or a process, but an opening through which the universe manifests. - Martin Heidegger
There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present. - James Joyce

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