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Re: Is meditation like taming a wild animal ?

PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 11:13 am
by Phil2
Enlightened2B wrote:
I'm actually working through a book right now called the 'presence process' by Michael Brown. It's a 10 week course which goes directly along with Eckhart's teachings on dealing with past emotions and emotional healing.


Hello Mike (aka E2B :) ),

Coming back to this interesting discussion, when you first mentionned this book ('Presence Process' by Michael Brown) I did not realize how close it was to the topic of this thread (Meditation taming a wild animal).

Indeed this book (currently reading it) explains quite well the emotional healing process of meditation.

I particularly liked his metaphor of the jar containing water and oil.

Michael Brown - The Presence Process wrote:A good metaphor to illustrate this procedure is to think of a jar containing oil and water. The water is who and what we really are while the oil is the sum of our uncomfortable physical, mental, and emotional experiences. When we are living in reaction, in victim or victor mentality, it is the same as shaking the jar endlessly in an attempt to make a change in our circumstances. Yet all that happens is that the oil and the water get so mixed up that it becomes impossible to tell one apart from the other. A l l that our endless "doings" accomplish is a murky mixture.
The Presence Process is all about "not doing". It teaches us to place the jar of our life experience down and leave it to "be". This automatically allows the oil to rise to the surface and to separate from the water.

This rising oil is our unconscious childhood memories and the negative belief systems they have spawned. They will automatically rise to the surface of our life experience when we engage in "not-doing".
The Presence Process, while simultaneously introducing us to the arena of "not-doing", instructs us how to gently begin scooping the oil of our suppressed emotions off the surface of our life experience. As we accomplish this, the jar of our life contains less and less oil. Simultaneously, the water,our life experience, regains clarity. In other words, by moving through The Presence Process, we automatically start becoming aware of who and what we really are as opposed to being endlessly distracted by the experiences that we have manufactured as a reaction to our inner discomforts.


There is indeed many similarities with "The Primal Scream" from Arthur Janov (as our friend Anton reminded us in his thread about the pain body), but the main difference (which Janov did not see) is that meditation is used here instead of Primal Therapy in order to make our past unresolved emotions come to the surface and be 'integrated' in consciousness.

I will probably say more on this later ...

Anyway thanks for the reference to this book.

:)

Re: Is meditation like taming a wild animal ?

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2015 2:18 am
by vivianamis
Is meditation like taming a wild animal ?


LOL I like that comparison.

I see the mind like a spoiled child, that constantly wants attention. Look at me, I want this, I want that. The mind is sometimes out of control and does need to be "trained" . Meditation serves as a great tool to do so. Meditating is focusing your attention on one thing and one thing only. Nisargadatta used "I am", Sri Ramana Maharshi used the question " Who am I?" When asking the question "Who am I?" answers will appear as thoughts in our head. These 'answers" are the identifications we have bought into throughout our life. The mind can only answer what we have entered into it. Since the real "Self" is neither the mind nor the body, nothing the mind could come up with is based on the "Truth".

When the mind has answered every possible answer, it becomes silent. It "gives up" so to say and the real "Self" is revealed.

Re: Is meditation like taming a wild animal ?

PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2015 8:47 am
by DavidB
Meditation is a wonderful tool for revealing the truth of who we really are.

Not this, Not this.

The wild beast becomes revealed to be a fragile frightened apparition.