Unforgettable experiences

Here you may share how the words Eckhart Tolle have affected your life.

Unforgettable experiences

Postby mrSunrise » Sun Feb 16, 2014 12:58 am

Hi everybody,

I'm writing this because i feel a bit lonely to not have anyone to whom share these experiences (excepting my cousin), and the most don't seem to be able to understand such things.

I was in the high school (maybe i was 15 years old) when i started to smoke weed and trying some psychedelic drugs like mushrooms. Maybe on mushrooms I got the first remarkable glimpse, but although that state of consciousness was strangely familiar at that time i was more impressed by the philosophical implications and the broad understanding of how the world works that the experience gave to me.

I always noticed a remarkable well-being and tranquility, sometimes even for weeks after the experince, but i didn't relate this feeling with the mind working less until several months later when I came upon an Osho's book (maybe it was "Awareness", i don't remember), I had already read some of his books but I didn't paid much atention to it, and until then it was just a kind of entertainment or an ordinary self-help book, I didn't give much importance to it. But that seemingly ordinary and unremarkable book turned out to be the solution to my life.

As I was saying, there was a great sense of well-being after the experiences, but as my mind started to work, soon it faded and I was back to the tiresome and ordinary life because I wasn't aware of meditation, I understood nothing about the mind's mechanism and how it works. All I knew is that the psychedelic could evoke a very interesting state of consciousness, i just didn't know that this same state could be experienced through meditation by witnessing the mind and being aware of my body.

After a very strong mushroom trip in the woods with my friends, I became so bewildered and amazed that sometimes I couldn't even remember who was I, althought it was an awkward feeling it wasn't bad. The constant thought stream became much less dense, and I could notice gaps between the thoughts. Then i started trying what Osho says in his books, and it was pretty easy, i would just sit and... I was no longer, there was only consciousness, this lasted maybe two weeks until again I got involved with the thoughts.

Then I knew that I could manage to get high without any drug, to stay aware would be enough, so i tried hard to "achieve" no-mind, every moment was an opportunity to stay aware, walking, eating, talking, getting angry, etc, I would be aware of what I was doing. As my awareness was getting intense thoughts was fading away. But another problem arised, a feeling of freedom and emptiness possessed me, it was awkward, and pretty scary, it was as if the ground was collapsing under my feet, my personality and my ego were falling to pieces, so I tried to bring thoughts again, and it was difficult, but I did manage.

I thought that I was going mad, so I gave up, but some weeks later I decided that i would not like to live like everyone else in this madness. I needed to stop thinking, then again I was watching everything i was doing, and that emptiness took place again... and it was scary, but I continued just to see where it would take me.

Although it was just about 4 years ago I don't remenber much details about that time, but i remember that in a few weeks I managed to stay in no-mind almost the whole day with only a few isolated thoughts that seemed to be just whispers, echoes of a forgotten mind.

There was no ego feeling, if someone insulted me it would be just pointless to respond it, the world became so beautiful that there was no point being angry, I would just laugh, anger just would not

arise. The world became very beautiful to me, my eyes were clear, so I could behold the awesomeness of nature.

I never thought I could be so happy, I was just laughing at ordinary things, everything seemed awesome, sometimes i would walk on the forest (btw the tropical forests here are quite beautiful) and it was such a joy, sometimes i would laugh madly or burst into tears, I couldn't believe, even in my dreams I couldn't imagine such feeling, I felt so light that sometimes it was as if i could take off.

Meditation had several implications in my life, for example, in the school I was a bit shy to talk to girls, but then as I was becoming more uninhibited I would flirt with all my classmates, creativity increased, I started speaking, walking, eating in a different way. I became very good at talking, sometimes my speaking sounded like poetry.

I could keep consciousness on almost every situation (i made great effort but i never managed staying aware in my sleep), sometimes i made some experiments like trying to keep awareness under alcohol or marijuana and it was easy.

I kept this state of consciousness for several months, I even believed i had become a buddha (in fact we're nothing but buddhas, we can't escape this fact), but the mind took place again, and since then the mind came and I returned to awareness countless times. Sometimes I still manage achieving no-mind but it doesn't last for too long as before, soon it fades.

But since I went to university last year (i'm studying IT) it has been difficult to keep awareness, there are lots of stuff to study, and i don't think that being too busy with logic thinking would help to get rid of mind, maybe I was born to be a vagabond, just doing nothing but meditate, there is no problem, I think the great meditators like Gautama Buddha were great vagabonds. Sometimes I still manage achieving no-mind but it doesn't last for too long as before, soon I get involved with mind.

I really miss that old times when I would just walk on the forest, sit under some tree and stay there for almost the whole day just enjoying the breeze, thinking in nothing, and with nothing to do or worry about. At least this experiences encouraged me to have a more balanced and healthy life in order to make it easier to meditate.

Many times i thought of quitting the university, but nowadays one can't be a vagabond unless you're rich.

Since I can't forget those experiences probably meditation will be a lifelong journey to me.

Do any of you face this same problem?

Althought I don't needed any drug to meditation, it was very useful when I started. What do you guys think about LSD/psilocybin and other psychedelics?

P.S. Sorry for my poor english, i'm not a native speaker.
mrSunrise
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Jan 19, 2014 3:01 am
Location: Brazil

Re: Unforgettable experiences

Postby Sighclone » Sun Feb 16, 2014 2:32 am

Welcome mrSunrise! (Moderators have to approve a few posts before they go live automatically.) Your English is fine for this forum. I have heard similar stories from many regarding psilocybin. In fact, a study continues at Johns Hopkins University (top-level school) - here is a useful link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbRbMavHm-8 (There are other links about him.)

Unity Consciousness arrives in fits and starts for many people. The ego is quick to return to the driver's seat. You mention what appears to be The Witness state of awareness, a common way-station.

As a suggestion, I recommend you plan your days with some specific time devoted to meditation and just keep on doing your studies at other times -- if an especially clear moment arises, great -- if none arise - great. No sense in trying to "cling" to a past experience.

Andy
A person is not a thing or a process, but an opening through which the universe manifests. - Martin Heidegger
There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present. - James Joyce
User avatar
Sighclone
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 6182
Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 6:22 pm

Re: Unforgettable experiences

Postby mrSunrise » Sun Feb 16, 2014 5:39 pm

Thanks for replying. It's good to reading some posts in this forum, the experience is the same. I thought it could be very rare someone become aware of meditation but many people seem to have experienced it.

And it's quite interesting how many people link the feeling during meditation and the experience with lsd, psilocybin, mescaline, etc. so i think it isn't irrelevant to discuss such chemicals when talking about meditation.

Sometimes i took lsd, and it worked well for me, it was quite easy to keep awareness in the days after the experience, but now i'm a little reluctant to do this because i want it to be by my own effort.

Most people say that drugs are bad things that can spoil the life (some can be), but they gave me a glimpse that I think 99.999% of people are unaware of, and it is an opportunity of a life, if you miss it you will die without knowing. For this, i think we're lucky by knowing the paths that lead to the truth of life.
mrSunrise
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Jan 19, 2014 3:01 am
Location: Brazil

Re: Unforgettable experiences

Postby peas » Mon Feb 17, 2014 1:56 am

Eckhart shared in a talk that he tried LSD once, after his awakening, to see what it was like. He found it to be a violent way of getting in touch with reality, beyond the mind. He hasn't tried it since.

Doors of Perception by Aldous Huxley is a great read. It explains his exploration of psychedelic drugs. A very honest account.

In all these things, including your own account, we can see the short term nature of any drug that moves you beyond thought. If it doesn't last, what's the point of it?

And then there is the new crutch developed by insisting that you move beyond thought. It becomes the new pursuit of happiness. We all know where that leads.
peas
 
Posts: 389
Joined: Tue Dec 24, 2013 3:42 pm

Re: Unforgettable experiences

Postby mrSunrise » Mon Feb 17, 2014 5:42 am

I think that the experience is the same regardless if It was caused by drugs or not, but with drugs it's more like being struck in the head, it's a shock, suddenly the dreams fade away. The same occurs with many other situations, it just triggered me something in a profound way that i think no other situation could do since at that time i didn't know meditation.

I agree when you said that it's a violent way, but without taking the drug I could never be aware of meditation. I managed to stop the mind many times by using nothing, and many times with the drug, both didn't last for too long as it was when I started. Maybe it's because of our natural trends (i don't think meditation has an important role at a biological/evolutive perspective) and the effort was not enough. To stay in no-mind is like walk on a knife's edge, if you vacillate much you fall.

Anyway, i feel motivated by reading the experiences and by talking to people who understands me.

Thank you all :)
mrSunrise
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Jan 19, 2014 3:01 am
Location: Brazil

Re: Unforgettable experiences

Postby Webwanderer » Mon Feb 17, 2014 8:11 am

The potential of psilocybin seems to have some merit. Andy's reference to the John Hopkins study is a good example of the research being done.

Another is by Robin Carthart-Harris who did brain imaging studies in England. Here is a link to one of his talks:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNR4o5JZEi0

Less dry, and likely more interesting are the following two researchers. First there is Paul Stamets who has spent a lifetime studying psilocybin and other mushrooms and through their use saw his mother cured of cancer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwLviP7KaAc

Then there is Simon G. Powell, a strong advocate who has made two excellent films on the subject of psilocybin mushrooms and has concluded that there is strong evidence of 'natural intelligence' in all of nature that has developed consciousness expanding compounds for the evolution of life on this planet. The first of his documentaries is called 'Manna' and speaks extensively on psilocybin mushrooms. The second is called Metanoia: A New Vision of Nature (a film about life, evolution and intelligence).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xfe7g-3Xuk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ff1Z8nGGebs

If one is interested in well researched and insightful information on the subject of psilocybin, all these links are excellent places to review.

WW
User avatar
Webwanderer
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 6280
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 12:03 am

Re: Unforgettable experiences

Postby Sighclone » Mon Feb 17, 2014 8:45 am

Thanks, WW -- excellent links -- except the Stamets link is a duplicate of the Cathcart-Harris one...

Andy
A person is not a thing or a process, but an opening through which the universe manifests. - Martin Heidegger
There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present. - James Joyce
User avatar
Sighclone
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 6182
Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 6:22 pm

Re: Unforgettable experiences

Postby Webwanderer » Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:57 pm

Thanks Andy. Fixed.

WW
User avatar
Webwanderer
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 6280
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 12:03 am

Re: Unforgettable experiences

Postby mrSunrise » Mon Feb 24, 2014 5:07 am

Sighclone wrote:Welcome mrSunrise! (Moderators have to approve a few posts before they go live automatically.) Your English is fine for this forum. I have heard similar stories from many regarding psilocybin. In fact, a study continues at Johns Hopkins University (top-level school) - here is a useful link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbRbMavHm-8 (There are other links about him.)

Unity Consciousness arrives in fits and starts for many people. The ego is quick to return to the driver's seat. You mention what appears to be The Witness state of awareness, a common way-station.

As a suggestion, I recommend you plan your days with some specific time devoted to meditation and just keep on doing your studies at other times -- if an especially clear moment arises, great -- if none arise - great. No sense in trying to "cling" to a past experience.

Andy


It seems as if studying stuff related to computer Science/mathematic and other things that demand much of the mind is totaly against meditation. I don't know how I would reconcile these two things and how i will manage to be in no-mind for the next years.

Sometimes I could stay aware for long periods of time, but just as i started using mind for things i needed the mind started pulling me back to the boring ordinary life again. It has been such a struggle to stay in no-mind in the last years.

Are you able to mentally deal with complex things and at the same time stay centered?
mrSunrise
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Jan 19, 2014 3:01 am
Location: Brazil

Re: Unforgettable experiences

Postby Sighclone » Mon Feb 24, 2014 6:26 pm

Interesting point about using technical mental skills vs. meditation. Meditation essentially relaxes the mind. It might take a few more minutes to settle into a meditative state if you are doing a lot of digital-type thinking. If you have an effective technique, just allow a few more minutes each session. I do not know where you are, but reading a copy of "Buddha's Brain" by Hanson and Mendius would be helpful.

Andy
A person is not a thing or a process, but an opening through which the universe manifests. - Martin Heidegger
There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present. - James Joyce
User avatar
Sighclone
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 6182
Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 6:22 pm

Re: Unforgettable experiences

Postby mrSunrise » Mon Mar 03, 2014 4:27 am

Sighclone wrote:Interesting point about using technical mental skills vs. meditation. Meditation essentially relaxes the mind. It might take a few more minutes to settle into a meditative state if you are doing a lot of digital-type thinking. If you have an effective technique, just allow a few more minutes each session. I do not know where you are, but reading a copy of "Buddha's Brain" by Hanson and Mendius would be helpful.

Andy


Thanks for the recommendation, I'll take a glance at it :)
mrSunrise
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Jan 19, 2014 3:01 am
Location: Brazil


Return to Personal Experiences

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests