Does it ever feel forced to you?

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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby erpman » Wed May 30, 2012 7:51 pm

Like an empty hollow concept of a few "letters", compared to the ever-changing indescribable living thing you saw in that instant (hope you understand what I'm trying to say here)...


It´s exactly what I´m getting at :)

But why do the thoughts arise in the first place, and so quickly, even when you're in nature? My current understanding is that there must be some emotion underneath them. How did you feel BEFORE you saw the ocean? Maybe a bit restless, tense, preoccupied, irritated, bored? Something like:

Restlessness in you - see the ocean (mind stops for a sec.) - restlessness makes the mind comment immediately - you notice that - restlessness makes you be restless that the mind is commenting (and off you go in the vicious circle)


I think there is a lot to this, and when you mention it, in moments of presence I´ve sometimes noticed a that a sort of knot in the stomach appears, like a distant anxiety. I don´t try to look away from it, but do as Eckhart suggests, to be there with my presence. But then I do expect it to go away. It´s about this point that the mind comes in with its speculations, and I see how the pattern you describe is very close to my experience. I am in general a restless person, and have also had some emotional problems the last 6-8 years. They are largely gone, but I suspect that there is a lot of residue or pain-body.

This week I went on my own to my family´s cottage which is situated in a beautiful undisturbed spot in the forest overlooking the ocean and the horizon. It´s a great place for meditation and contemplation. For the first few days this experience of mental commentary was more prevalent than toward the end. So the diminishment of commentary largely coincided with me leaving more and more concerns from my ordinary life behind, and just being there doing whatever I felt like.

I also noticed that when I stopped bothering about thoughts creeping in, but just observing them, I was calmer, and could even enjoy my thoughts. I think the vicious cycle can be broken at the point of noticing the thoughts arising. That´s where you just have to accept, and return to presence, maybe take a deep breath for every time or something like that. The "trying to be present" is after all wanting something more, not being at peace with the present situation (or in buddha terms: desire) Then the starting point is one of dissatisfaction, which has as it´s emotional counterpart restlessness. I find it easier to be present when meditating, since the rules are so simple: focus on breath, if thought- acnowledge and return to breath. In real life its much more complex.

But there is still a paradox, although I feel that through this discussion we are coming closer to an understanding of it.
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby Jbrooke » Thu May 31, 2012 3:23 am

Well said.

It seems like so many of us struggle with "trying to be present". We are all so conditioned in our own way. Reconditioning is where the effort lies. The effort to be effortless...

I do tend to view it as being a process of reconditioning. I just started reading Adya's 'The End of Your World' and so far I sense that he places a high value on reconditioning the ego. I am really enjoying this new book!
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby Golf » Thu May 31, 2012 5:28 pm

erpman wrote:I think there is a lot to this, and when you mention it, in moments of presence I´ve sometimes noticed a that a sort of knot in the stomach appears, like a distant anxiety. I don´t try to look away from it, but do as Eckhart suggests, to be there with my presence. But then I do expect it to go away. It´s about this point that the mind comes in with its speculations, and I see how the pattern you describe is very close to my experience.


Yes, that's it! Eckhart says in one place that one of the mind's functions is to "cover up" your restlessness and uneasiness, and that's one of the reasons why it does so much thinking all the time. So that the focus of your attention gets absorbed on thoughts, and not in the unpleasant feelings of restlessness.
Then you calm your thoughts a bit, and then this deep (suppressed by all the thinking) knot of anxiety unveils itself. You get a glimpse of it and then the mind comes back automatically to cover it up again. Do you find this to be true?

Maybe you could try to go a bit deeper now. When you notice the knot of anxiety, could you then try to observe the tendency that you expect it to go away? Could you become aware of the feelings and thoughts that you begin to have, once you notice the knot is there?

I find it easier to be present when meditating, since the rules are so simple: focus on breath, if thought- acnowledge and return to breath. In real life its much more complex.

Yeah, I know what you mean. But maybe it we figure this out, it'll become easier in real life too. Wouldn't that be an awesome thing?
"If you're so smart, how come you're working at a gas station?"
-"It's a service station. We offer service, there is no higher purpose."
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby erpman » Thu May 31, 2012 6:57 pm

Eckhart says in one place that one of the mind's functions is to "cover up" your restlessness and uneasiness, and that's one of the reasons why it does so much thinking all the time. So that the focus of your attention gets absorbed on thoughts, and not in the unpleasant feelings of restlessness.


Could you be referring to this quote from "The Power of Now"?

Make it a habit to monitor your mental-emotional state through self-observation. `Am I at ease at this moment?" is a good question to ask yourself frequently. Or you can ask: "What's going on inside me at this moment?" Be at least as interested in what goes on inside you as what happens outside. If you get the inside right, the outside will fall into place. Primary reality is within, secondary reality without. But don't answer these questions immediately. Direct your attention inward. Have a look inside yourself. What kind of thoughts is your mind producing? What do you feel? Direct your attention into the body. Is there any tension? Once you detect that there is a low level of unease, the background static, see in what way you are avoiding, resisting, or denying life - by denying the Now. There are many ways in which people unconsciously resist the present moment.

You get a glimpse of it and then the mind comes back automatically to cover it up again. Do you find this to be true?


So so true.

I remember two years ago when my ex girlfriend broke up with me. In the months following the breakup my thoughts were racing incessantly about strategies for getting back together with her. In the same period my heartbeat rythm got severely disturbed. At first I didn´t know what it was, and when I asked my doctor about it, she replied "is there something particular on your mind these days?" I replied, "well, yeah, im going through a tough breakup". "Well there you have it" she replied... I realized that I was actually in a permanent state of anxiety, or of having this knot in my stomach all the time basically. It coincided well with all my plotting and scheming.

It seems like so many of us struggle with "trying to be present". We are all so conditioned in our own way. Reconditioning is where the effort lies. The effort to be effortless...


I think it´s also important that we remember not to make this too complicated, but rather focus on the fact that being in the now is actually very simple. At the same time I think Eckhart discribes this somewhat confusingly. On the one hand, he urges us not to make presence into a future goal or something to be attained. But he also describes the ability to be present as something which grows over time. It can sound contradictory, but I don´t think it is. Presence is always acessible right now, but the habit of remembering to seek it out takes time to build up.

Maybe you could try to go a bit deeper now. When you notice the knot of anxiety, could you then try to observe the tendency that you expect it to go away? Could you become aware of the feelings and thoughts that you begin to have, once you notice the knot is there?


I´m on it! But do you think that there is a point to trying to figure out where it comes from, like if it could be pain-body residues from that break-up for example? Or is this sort of unease actually just an interanlized resistance to the now?
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby Jbrooke » Thu May 31, 2012 11:07 pm

I´m on it! But do you think that there is a point to trying to figure out where it comes from, like if it could be pain-body residues from that break-up for example? Or is this sort of unease actually just an interanlized resistance to the now?


This is a question I have also. I mean, is trying to figure out where it comes from only contributing to the overthinking and analyzation? There are many times when I try to figure out where it is coming from and the search to find out only creates more frenzied mind work. And I don't always get to the bottom of it anyway.
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby erpman » Sat Jun 02, 2012 11:27 am

I was listening to a podcast on zen meditation yesterday, and the speaker said something interesting. She said that it´s a very bad idea to start a meditation practice when you are in a life crisis, as a means to solve the crisis. That will not work, and will confuse the meditation as well. I think Eckhart says something similar, that it´s important to practice presence when life is going relatively smoothly.

I think both these statements imply that if we make presence (or meditation) into a means for getting rid of our unease and problems, we are on the wrong path. This becomes pronounced in the vicious cycle that we talked about. "I feel restless now, I should try to be more present" (which of course is better than nothing at all). But it´s a negative motivation. A positive motivation would be somthing like "I am present. Hm, a restlessness, well, that´s ok, I´ll be present with my restlessness." But it´s paradoxical, because we know that presence can dissolve restlessness, but only when we don´t expect presence to dissolve the restlessness...
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby Golf » Sat Jun 02, 2012 7:25 pm

erpman wrote:I was listening to a podcast on zen meditation yesterday, and the speaker said something interesting. She said that it´s a very bad idea to start a meditation practice when you are in a life crisis, as a means to solve the crisis. That will not work, and will confuse the meditation as well. I think Eckhart says something similar, that it´s important to practice presence when life is going relatively smoothly.

I think both these statements imply that if we make presence (or meditation) into a means for getting rid of our unease and problems, we are on the wrong path. This becomes pronounced in the vicious cycle that we talked about. "I feel restless now, I should try to be more present" (which of course is better than nothing at all). But it´s a negative motivation. A positive motivation would be somthing like "I am present. Hm, a restlessness, well, that´s ok, I´ll be present with my restlessness." But it´s paradoxical, because we know that presence can dissolve restlessness, but only when we don´t expect presence to dissolve the restlessness...


This is very insightful. Maybe I can offer another point of view on it... I didn't post because Reality hit me in the head and knocked me on my arse two days ago. All this reading, practicing and thinking was basically good but it was mired with some selfishness too. My intentions were honest but I discovered that they were corrupted also with pretty big self-absorption and neglect of other duties. So I managed to estrange myself from my significant other and only saw that she was unhappy when she couldn't take it anymore.

It was like an ice cold shower. I saw I needed to forget myself sometimes and to be there for her in a much bigger way. The solution was to reduce this self-absorbtion with reading and meditating, and increase the ammount of housework and stuff done instead of her, to focus less on problematic thoughts and emotions and give her more love and attention.
And it works, she's much happier now! :D

So this is another way to presence, like from a paradoxical opposite direction. I still have all these thoughts and emotions inside me, and have to shake myself out of apathy 10 times a day to get things done, but it's so much easier and more effective now that I see what needs to be done. It's having something other than yourself that you value and committing yourself to it over and over, selflessly. And it automatically achieves less preoccupation with your thoughts and emotions, and more well-being.
I can't believe I just didn't SEE what I was doing before... I'm excited that I can finally come to my senses now and start making her happy, and listening what she needs, and to forget a bit about myself and my problems. What a relief! :mrgreen:

I hope you can also find a way to implement this in your own situations.
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby Jbrooke » Sat Jun 02, 2012 8:12 pm

erpman and Golf,

You two are offering a lot of insight and I appreciate it!

Golf: your revelation (that arose from observing and instinct, I imagine) about focusing your attention to other things and people in your life and choosing not to forget about yourself for awhile in order to balance your life... this is something I have been playing around with myself. I guess it all boils down to trusting what feels right for ourselves individually and trusting our instincts. What I tend to get caught up in however, is that when I do realize that I need to take a break from my own "stuff" and turn my focus more on my family and so on, that the impetus to do so sometimes comes from self judgement and guilt and then I judge myself for THAT! Instead of just trusting my instinct to refocus on other people and things and get on with it without guilt and self judgment being the motivators. Does this even make sense? (Man, I really get too analytical and start chasing my own tail most of the time!)

erpman:
I think both these statements imply that if we make presence (or meditation) into a means for getting rid of our unease and problems, we are on the wrong path. This becomes pronounced in the vicious cycle that we talked about. "I feel restless now, I should try to be more present" (which of course is better than nothing at all). But it´s a negative motivation. A positive motivation would be somthing like "I am present. Hm, a restlessness, well, that´s ok, I´ll be present with my restlessness." But it´s paradoxical, because we know that presence can dissolve restlessness, but only when we don´t expect presence to dissolve the restlessness...


I really like this. Yes, perhaps it's a bit paradoxical, but it is about taking positive action that can only help us.

Jen
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby smiileyjen101 » Sun Jun 03, 2012 2:44 am

golf said: I'm excited that I can finally come to my senses now and start making her happy, and listening what she needs, and to forget a bit about myself and my problems. What a relief!


jen said: What I tend to get caught up in however, is that when I do realize that I need to take a break from my own "stuff" and turn my focus more on my family and so on, that the impetus to do so sometimes comes from self judgement and guilt and then I judge myself for THAT! Instead of just trusting my instinct to refocus on other people and things and get on with it without guilt and self judgment being the motivators.


erpman said: she said that it´s a very bad idea to start a meditation practice when you are in a life crisis, as a means to solve the crisis. That will not work, and will confuse the meditation as well. I think Eckhart says something similar, that it´s important to practice presence when life is going relatively smoothly.


Can you guys see that these three examples are all treating things/situations as a means to an end?

Golf, you may be surprised at yours being included in this and it may be in error, but it stems from a notion you 'used' to have that you were 'helping her' rather than doing what needs to be done - I've underlined the bit that 'irks' in resonance a little - absolutely you can do what needs to be done with presence, absolutely you can listen with your full attention to what it is your gf (or anyone) is saying, absolutely people will be more open to love energy when they can see and feel they are so heard and respected... but if you 'think' (and this is the bit I'm not sure about and you will have to be absolutely honest with yourself as to the resonant intention) you are doing this in order to 'make her happy' = if so you are using it as a means to an end and stepping outside of what is your experience (still.. and you get to be the hero in the tale, 'making her happy' :wink: )

Rather, say if the 'doing' is washing dishes that have recently held a meal you have eaten. Presence/awareness in that task would be on that task for its own sake. It may have a resonance of gratitude and awareness and even reflection in the course of the tasks - those thoughts might be appreciation, gratitude - for the meal the dish once held, for the dish itself and the maker, the designer, the way it came into your life, for the hot water, for humankind's inventiveness and growth of knowledge of hygiene and health benefits, for the warmth on your hands, for the satisfaction of a full belly, for the ingredients and service that either one of you put into the creation of the meal... do you see the difference? This task can be a meditation in itself, for itself - presence, oneness, connectedness, gratitude, love, honesty, undistorted flowing thoughts on a stream of conscious love energy.

If the task is done as a means to an end, as Jen said when she uses focussing on her family as a means to an end to balancing her self 'stuff' and BEING with her family, there will be conflicting fear thoughts - with washing the dishes it might be - am I doing it how she likes it? Is she going to praise me the way I like it? Why hasn't she noticed or said how well I am doing it? Why is she unhappy two hours later - I washed the dishes didn't I?

Notice if you are doing a thing as a means to end. There is an immense experiential difference even in having a shower to 'get clean' or to 'go out' or any other 'reason', and having a shower absolutely at one with the water, flow, temperature, the soap, the experience. this is awakened doing - this is going beyond acceptance to putting joy into and how enthusiasm can be reached by enjoying each moment in the journey to a goal - without making the 'goal' the important thing and the journey the means to an end without savouring it honestly, awarely.

For enthusiasm ET says it's like being an arrow flying to a target and enjoying the ride. Conscious 'being' can be a gift to others around you, but it's not the 'goal'.
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby Jbrooke » Sun Jun 03, 2012 4:09 am

Hi Jen- Thanks for your response!

Since you were using dish washing as an example (a good one, I might add:) I wanted to ask a question using that specific topic:

In the evenings, I wash my husband's and my dishes from dinner after making and eating the meal. I cannot lie and say that I would REALLY appreciate it if he offered to wash them every once in a while. It would make me feel more appreciated, to be honest. And it would be a nice break for me. I do not look forward to washing the dishes every night. But I do it. Since waking up a bit and gaining more understanding about the present, I make attempts to appreciate the experience of the act. I am trying to become aware of the water on my fingers and the sensation of the plate in my hands and so on. But these are things I have to remind and tell myself to do to TRY and appreciate them and be in the moment and I can't always feel the gratitude and enjoy the sensations and such. Many times I just want to get the dishes done because I want to clean up and I want my husband to be happy and I don't want to leave dirty dishes in the sink, etc. I know that this is a means to an end as well. So, if I am not naturally inclined to wash the dishes- if I just don't feel like it (which is a lot of the time!) am I not simply trying to appreciate the moment in a contrived manner? Am I not simply lying to myself and manufacturing an appreciation or "good feeling"? Or is it ultimately a matter of learning to make the best of a situation I honestly don't care for and accepting it and then finding the good in it? is that more of what it is all about?

Would love your opinion:)
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby smiileyjen101 » Sun Jun 03, 2012 8:38 am

Thanks for asking jen, I'd love to comment on your example.
But these are things I have to remind and tell myself to do to TRY and appreciate them and be in the moment and I can't always feel the gratitude and enjoy the sensations and such.

There is a resonant difference between trying and doing google search Tony Robbins and the lady trying to pick up her chair if you haven't already seen that video, or maybe golf will repost it.
Trying the 'focus' is on trying, with all the stories of excuses. Stop trying. When you want to do something just do it.
If you're making excuses then you're making excuses.
If the appreciation is not on/in the task then it's elsewhere, no use fighting that, let it go.
Either you are appreciating NOW or you're not, no biggie, stop beating yourself up.

Many times I just want to get the dishes done because I want to clean up and I want my husband to be happy and I don't want to leave dirty dishes in the sink,

There's a few conflicting 'wants' in this message, let's unpack them.
'I want to clean up' = then do it, you are able to respond to this task and whatever attitude you take to it will determine the experience - remember always no choice is wrong, it just brings a different experience.
If you want to clean up and sing your heart out while you're doing it, go ahead. If you want to bitch and moan and criticise every crumb and stain on the plates, go for it!! If you want to steam up about not being appreciated... hmmm, well if you really want to experience that by all means, do it consciously though.

I can't begin to tell you how many arguments, protestations, beds for anger have been made in the humble chore of washing dishes - parents make rosters, kids scream and argue - It's your turn!! Funny thing is when we are little kids and we notice it - the bubbles, the warm water etc we make play of it - until we start seeing it as a chore.

"I want my husband to be happy'... hmm .. not within your response ability, and I bet if you asked him for a list of the top 10 things that make him happy you doing the dishes would not be in them :wink: which is why he probably doesn't see it as an opportunity to help you feel appreciated by taking it up once in a while. Of course he would 'notice' if they weren't done, but you'd be more worried about what he's thinking about YOU if they weren't done.

It like many household chores becomes 'someone's job' whether by default or agreement. Default can lead to resentment and it becoming a battle ground. It's actually worth negotiating and then whoever is 'doing' at any time is the one with the response ability - no one else is allowed to criticise or 'expect' that it will be done the way they would do it - and these negotiations filter through to other elements of respect and appreciation of differences within relationships.

Am I not simply lying to myself and manufacturing an appreciation or "good feeling"? Or is it ultimately a matter of learning to make the best of a situation I honestly don't care for and accepting it and then finding the good in it? is that more of what it is all about?

You can do any or all of the above all in the course of doing any thing. How would you prefer to do it?

Acceptance says 'for this moment, in this instance, this is what is required.
That's unemotional, no stories, no drama, just do it. It's the first of three conscious ways of being/doing.

In conscious awareness you may decide to put joy into the task - no one's forcing you and it doesn't matter if you don't. I just find it more fun, more fulfilling - enjoyment is putting joy into whatever you are doing, even if it is something that is required of you in this moment.

Enthusiasm is noticing that clean dishes lays the foundation for a more peaceful sleep and a waking to a clean kitchen and so it takes on a 'bigger', 'brighter' more purposeful part of a whole - not as means to an end, but as an inevitability stepping towards something desirable, within provisos that it may not... someone could come along and bake cakes and leave a mess... so not in an attached or making enemy, obstacle, or means to an end, just a step.

If you REALLY don't like it and can't accept it there are sane options.. the three options then are accept, change, or remove yourself from the situation.

You could trade dishes for throwaway containers, you could totally minimise the number of dishes you use and only ever cook one pot dishes and eat out of the pot with one shared fork

; ) see, in essence you have 'chosen' along all of the steps that have led up to 'dirty dishes needing to be washed'. You're not a 'victim' of the sink duties, you DO have choices.

Being present, conscious, aware is like most things - 99% attitude.

I don't see how you can be conscious, present, aware and lie to yourself about what it is you are doing.. you know you're lying to yourself and that's what you're putting into this moment. No choice is wrong....

If you feel the division of labour is unfair discuss it rationally, not as an emotive or silent plea for appreciation - love is not a trade, it's an expression of who you really are and recognition of who another really is, relating with another requires practical and spiritual elements in shared experiences. Honesty is the highest form of love. But if you start defining your worthiness, or the doing of things by the 'appreciation' level of another you're setting yourself up for disappointment and setting them up for failure.
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby erpman » Sun Jun 03, 2012 11:20 am

Can you guys see that these three examples are all treating things/situations as a means to an end?


The point I was trying to make was precisely that treating meditation/presence as a means to an end is a bad idea, so I don´t immediately see how my quote implies this. Could you elaborate?

I must say I like where this discussion is going :D
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby Jbrooke » Sun Jun 03, 2012 9:41 pm

I also like where this discussion is going :D

Jen- wonderful input. Thank you! Lots of gems in there.
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby smiileyjen101 » Mon Jun 04, 2012 3:56 am

erpman said: she said that it´s a very bad idea to start a meditation practice when you are in a life crisis, as a means to solve the crisis.

That will not work, and will confuse the meditation as well.

I think Eckhart says something similar, that it´s important to practice presence when life is going relatively smoothly.


:)jen said: Can you guys see that these three examples are all treating things/situations as a means to an end?


Erpman said: The point I was trying to make was precisely that treating meditation/presence as a means to an end is a bad idea, so I don´t immediately see how my quote implies this. Could you elaborate?

I must say I like where this discussion is going [quote]

Hmm initially I was going to respond by saying that your quote erpman was a springboard to explain how it 'spoke' to the other two quotes, but on deeper reflection, grouping them all together is probably more correct.

Meditation will not 'work' to solve a crisis, you have to go 'through' a thing to understand all the perspectives of it and come to acceptance... that's kind of the work through the notions of whether to accept, change or remove yourself from a situation.. and in all responses within that, be conscious of that which it is that you are choosing and doing.

Whichever one of those things you choose as a response you are then consciously being and doing whichever you have chosen, and then you can move from acceptance of that to putting joy into, to gaining confidence and employing enthusiasm as a free flying expression of who you really are - the BIG you who has all the energy of the universe at your disposal to direct in love and compassion for self and all.

But your take on what that lady said and what ET says is still treating things/situations as a means to an end...
Using meditation to solve a crisis, you don't need to meditate you only need to 'solve' - come to terms with and choose your response consciously
Using when life is going relatively smoothly to practice presence is taking you away from what is - it also gives you a cop out to not respond consciously with love and compassion in the moment - I'll think about that next time things are going a bit smoother ....ppfftt
If your response is to delay responding then your response is no response in this moment
- own it, don't excuse it.

(and practice for me has the same resonance as 'trying') - the focus is on 'practising' as if its not the real deal - every moment is the real deal and it only comes this once - you can 'try' in the moment, you can 'practice' in that moment or you can BE in/with/one the moment and respond consciously - then let it go. Just like a breath breathed out a new moment will flow in, you don't have to schedule for them, in fact you can't 'schedule' for them they come when they come.

I'm realising verbs are important, honesty about which verb you are applying be it
ignoring, delaying, responding, evaluating, musing, noticing,
thinking, trading, loving, resisting, accepting, enjoying, en-thusing (putting conscious energy into)
these all have nuances of energy that you are putting in to the moment - all are valid, all will bring a different experience but knowing and being honest about what it is you are putting into a moment adds to clarity, adds to lightness and love and acceptance and enjoyment and ability to fly like an arrow in a direction and enjoy the ride no matter where or what the arrow flies through.

If I am pissed off in a moment I'm pissed off in a moment. If I then absorb a nuance of the moment that wasn't clear I then adjust like the arrow suddenly changing direction by degrees I don't hold on to pissed off for any longer than 'pissed off' rises and falls. If I choose to be pissed off for 10 minutes or 10 days or 40 years I enjoy being pissed off, I be pissed off with enthusiasm, it's as much fun to be pissed off as to be confused as to be happy as to be curious as to be singing as to be laughing or farting or screaming or crying or whatever until such time as I chose to reframe my response.

Meditating is meditating, not practicing consciousness.
Practicing consciousness is practicing, not being conscious.
Being conscious is everything - if we chose to be conscious we can be conscious in any and every or no moments - and that's all okay too, it just brings a different experience.
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Re: Does it ever feel forced to you?

Postby smiileyjen101 » Mon Jun 04, 2012 4:34 am

I added this quote to another thread ages ago, I think it's relevant here with the wisdom from Conversations with God that honesty is the highest form of love. Honouring life is to honour the moments, honouring self and others is to become one in honesty.

I can't remember the author but I still remember an inspirational little quote (paraphrasing)

Little drops of water,
tiny grains of sand,
make the mighty oceans
and the sweeping lands.

Precious little moments,
tiny though they be,
make the might ages,
of eternity.

Just as wise old folks will tell you to look after the pennies and the pounds will take care of themselves, so too with your life. Know you are enough in each moment and honour these, and your life will take care of itself.

Our rights start deep within our humanity; they end where another's begin~~ SmileyJen
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