Some observations/questions

Talk about anything Tolle-related here.

Some observations/questions

Postby Heisenberg » Fri Mar 01, 2013 5:12 pm

I've been listening and reading Tolle for about a year now. I've gone in and out of presence, there have been times when I simply wanted to throw aside all spiritual teachings and revert back to unconciousness. But now I feel like the "flowering" is starting to happen and the teachings that were before a bit abstract and only understood by the mind begin to sink in deeper to the level of beyond mind.

I have a few observations. The first is that when my life was not going well (I was broke, had almost no food for a while, had to deal with a new night job and the stress accompanying it) and my basic needs were in jeopardy, I felt the most resistance to life and had the most trouble being concious. No matter how present I was, I felt that I couldn't really overcome these obstacles with presence alone and the stress and unhealthy living made my unconciousness far greater. Listening to Tolle was almost like a coping mechanism during this time, but it helped me get through. We humans are of course in large part bio-chemical beings and we need our good foods and sleep in order to experience some form of inner calmth and happiness. It was only when I could finally fulfill these basic needs that I began feeling happier and could feel and sense the "God-essence" in me and everyone else that Tolle speaks about.

Secondly I have a question regarding Tolle's (and for that matter Buddha's, Jesus, etc.) views on judging. He says "When you judge others you judge yourself". I have wondered how this works.
I grasp the notion of "illusion of seperateness" and how we all come from the same source (the universe, whatever you call it) and that we are all part of that universal conciousness and that this understanding creates great love for all beings and humans. But when someone judges someone else and strengthens their ego, how exactly does that person then "judge themselves"? Is this some form of Karma Eckhart alludes to? Or is it that when someone strengthens their ego this only creates more suffering for themselves because More ego = More suffering?

Thank you.
Heisenberg
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2012 8:03 pm

Re: Some observations/questions

Postby Webwanderer » Fri Mar 01, 2013 7:29 pm

Heisenberg wrote:It was only when I could finally fulfill these basic needs that I began feeling happier and could feel and sense the "God-essence" in me and everyone else that Tolle speaks about.

Yes, as the story goes, when your up to your ass in alligators it's tough to remember that your objective was to drain the swamp. Life can be distracting. These challenges are an opportunity for learning to focus our attention rather than be controlled by conditions.

"When you judge others you judge yourself". I have wondered how this works.

Here's my take: Our 'self' is an extension of Source. Our true nature is Self/Source. It is not the egoic identification, the 'me', that we temporarily adopt when in this physical human experience. That Self is the common, universal, source of our oneness with each other and with all life - and that includes all experience.

So when we judge another, or another's action, as 'wrong' we are saying that that is not us. We are rejecting that, which in the greater reality, is a part of All That Is - and of which we are a part. Unconsciously (or maybe not so unconsciously) judging something or someone as wrong, is to say that is 'not me'. 'I reject that part of life.' What happens then is we create a sense of separateness from a legitimate part of life, and from a part of our Whole Being.

Judging, in reality, makes little if any difference to the judged, but it does create a contraction in the judger's perspective, thus making the one judging feel smaller. That is the value in being more accepting (not necessarily approving) of all life's experiences. Acceptance is expansive to consciousness, resistance is contracting.

WW
User avatar
Webwanderer
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 6279
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 12:03 am

Re: Some observations/questions

Postby treasuretheday » Fri Mar 01, 2013 10:05 pm

Webwanderer wrote:Judging, in reality, makes little if any difference to the judged, but it does create a contraction in the judger's perspective, thus making the one judging feel smaller.


My experience bears this out. Yes, when I judge I certainly feel more separation, & not only do I feel "smaller," but like I am "missing" gigantic pieces of the puzzle....like the one that says, "PEACE" on it, & the one that says "LOVE" on it! I am out of alignment with my true nature.

Judging is draining, depleting & exhausting. Being judgemental is to live in a prison of sorts. Begs the question, why are we so reluctant to leave our inner prisons? I guess there is security in the confinement & limitation that we know, & a fear of the unknown? I think of some of the characters in the movie The Shawshank Redemption...they were so fearful of getting out of prison! Morgan Freeman's character has an aha moment & decides, "You can either get busy living or get busy dying" & he chooses life, unlike many of his predecessors. Consequently, freedom was not an easy road, but ultimately he finds joy & adventure that he never would have experienced within the prison walls.

Sorry...went off down the rabbit trail. Back to judging (one of my favorite pastimes :oops: ). When a habit of judging falls away, we discover that we, the judgers, are the primary beneficiaries. When we cease to judge, we are in sync with our higher self, so there is less discord. There is harmony.
Life itself is the proper binge.
-Julia Child
User avatar
treasuretheday
 
Posts: 660
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2012 3:42 pm
Location: Virginia Beach, VA, USA

Re: Some observations/questions

Postby Yutso » Sat Mar 02, 2013 5:47 am

Humans cannot control the initial emotions, thoughts, impulses, desires, or cravings that arise. When we are trying to be aware of mental phenomena we must not judge. We just watch. Let the phenomena arise, let it pass. Berating or shaming oneself for what arises is counterproductive. This is where nonjudgmental mindfulness is essential.

In terms of actions we must make judgments. Harmful actions void of values and morals, bad. Actions arising out of compassion, good.
Yutso
 
Posts: 294
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 11:34 pm


Return to General Eckhart Tolle Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest