Help with fear?

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RettaHB
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Help with fear?

Post by RettaHB » Fri Mar 04, 2011 7:59 pm

I know about being present. I know that fear is the unknown and abstract future. So why does it continue to consume me? Any tricks or helpful advice would be most appreciated.
thank you :-)

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eputkonen
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Re: Help with fear?

Post by eputkonen » Fri Mar 04, 2011 9:37 pm

RettaHB wrote:I know about being present. I know that fear is the unknown and abstract future. So why does it continue to consume me? Any tricks or helpful advice would be most appreciated.
thank you :-)
Don't be vague or abstact, what is the worst that could happen? Is it really that bad?

A lot of fear and worry derive from vague imaginations, but if we really delve into it...it isn't that bad.

What is your biggest fear right now?
Namaste,

~ Eric Putkonen
@EngagedNondual on Twitter
https://www.youtube.com/EricPutkonen

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rachMiel
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Re: Help with fear?

Post by rachMiel » Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:40 pm

RettaHB wrote:I know about being present. I know that fear is the unknown and abstract future. So why does it continue to consume me?
RettaHB, hi. :-) Knowing these things conceptually and KNOWING them experientially are very different "knowings." The more present you are in your moment-to-moment life, the less room there will be for fear, thoughts of the the future, etc. Try BEING present more, knowing about it conceptually less. :-)
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily ...

Blenderhead
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Re: Help with fear?

Post by Blenderhead » Sat Mar 05, 2011 7:47 pm

I think there is a feeling of fear, if you have lost connection to the source :)

Butterfli
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Re: Help with fear?

Post by Butterfli » Sat Mar 05, 2011 8:00 pm

Hi,
We have all been conditioned to feel fear and it has become a normal feeling for all of us. I think its a process to dissolve the conditioned fear. When I have a fear (ex: not good enough or I'm not doing what I think I should be doing) I recognize the thought. I look at the thought and ask myself "Who is saying I'm not good enough?" and the more I do this and become aware of my fears, I notice a shift in my thinking. My fears are less and less but still there. I have to remember to not judge or beat myself up when a fear comes up and accept it and look at it and move on. I've noticed the more I do this, the less fear I have. I've also noticed that it takes psychological time to work on dissolving the fears and to be patient with myself.
Instead of being lost in your thinking (fear - I added that part), when you are awake you recognize yourself as the awareness behind it. Thinking then ceases to be a self-serving autonomous activity that takes possession of you and runs your life. Awareness takes over from thinking. Instead of being in charge of your life, thinking becomes the servant of awareness. ~Eckhart Tolle
Eckhart says the first thing to do is "acceptance." So acceptance that I have this fear will dissolve the fear. And it will come up again and again and continue to accept it and look at it. I'm working on this as well! We are all in the same boat.

Peace and light to you,
andrea

hanss
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Re: Help with fear?

Post by hanss » Sat Mar 05, 2011 9:42 pm

eputkonen wrote:
RettaHB wrote:I know about being present. I know that fear is the unknown and abstract future. So why does it continue to consume me? Any tricks or helpful advice would be most appreciated.
thank you :-)
Don't be vague or abstact, what is the worst that could happen? Is it really that bad?

A lot of fear and worry derive from vague imaginations, but if we really delve into it...it isn't that bad.

What is your biggest fear right now?
I have tried this myself with good result. To get really practical and think every detail thru. Write it down too.
"In today's rush we all think too much, seek too much, want too much and forget about the joy of just Being."
(Eckhart Tolle)

garuda
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Re: Help with fear?

Post by garuda » Sun Mar 06, 2011 5:03 pm

RettaHB wrote:I know about being present. I know that fear is the unknown and abstract future. So why does it continue to consume me?
Isn’t it the thought about “knowing it” followed by your “belief in it” that gives "fear" the power over you? Try dropping the intellectual “knowing” and the mental label called “fear” that is couched in the thought of “knowing” and see what happens.

Try an experiment. For several seconds or minutes bring your full alert focused attention on some tangible object in the room (not some thought) and remain fully concentrated on that object without any thoughts about anything. Look at the object with a blank stare. Remain in that riveted blank stare --- just "looking" only, and without any intention of seeing the object. It’s the “looking” stage that happens the split-second before the “seeing” stage occurs --- before the mind can begin identifying or evaluating the quality of your seeing an object.

After you have finished this “looking” only experiment --- then think back to see if there was any fear arising while just looking only. If there was no fear present during this looking exercise, then ask yourself why that is. Explore to see if it was because there were no thoughts arising in which fear could be carried into present consciousness. Examine this carefully. Repeat the experiment if necessary. And learn first-hand, directly the relationship between the nature of fear and the thoughts we innocently tend to belief as being real.

Now realize that any latent fear you may have had, like failing your college course or your driving test, may still exist as a possibility and reside in the background of your memory. But in that moment of selfless staring at the object, the fear was gone. Was it because the thoughts of fear became suspended from consciousness during the staring exercise? If so, learn from that fact. An then work with that learned belief in the emptiness of fear when it arises in your everyday life situations. We may in fact fail our driving test, but will worrisome or fearful thoughts about the test improve the likelihood for success? So what value is the fear, which is optional?

Aren’t the thoughts around fear merely bursts of energy that have no real substance or power, unless we falsely believe in their realness. Do we mistakenly believe our thoughts to be true? If you are standing five feet away from a wild grizzly bear, do you need a "thought" from the mind to warn you of the danger? So why would you believe in a mere imaginary fear (thought) of a bear when no bear is in front of you. Does that sound silly to you? So why do we become fearful from a mere thought?

And is the riveted stare devoid of a “self” during that staring process? Examine why that is. If you explore this intently, you may discover directly the nature and emptiness of the fear itself.
Recognize present awareness......... rest in that awareness..........don’t become distracted.

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Re: Help with fear?

Post by enigma » Sun Mar 06, 2011 8:19 pm

garuda wrote:
RettaHB wrote:I know about being present. I know that fear is the unknown and abstract future. So why does it continue to consume me?
Isn’t it the thought about “knowing it” followed by your “belief in it” that gives "fear" the power over you? Try dropping the intellectual “knowing” and the mental label called “fear” that is couched in the thought of “knowing” and see what happens.
How does one drop knowledge and belief? Is this something one can choose to do?

Try an experiment. For several seconds or minutes bring your full alert focused attention on some tangible object in the room (not some thought) and remain fully concentrated on that object without any thoughts about anything. Look at the object with a blank stare. Remain in that riveted blank stare --- just "looking" only, and without any intention of seeing the object. It’s the “looking” stage that happens the split-second before the “seeing” stage occurs --- before the mind can begin identifying or evaluating the quality of your seeing an object.

After you have finished this “looking” only experiment --- then think back to see if there was any fear arising while just looking only. If there was no fear present during this looking exercise, then ask yourself why that is. Explore to see if it was because there were no thoughts arising in which fear could be carried into present consciousness. Examine this carefully. Repeat the experiment if necessary. And learn first-hand, directly the relationship between the nature of fear and the thoughts we innocently tend to belief as being real.
Okay, so without thought, there is no fear. So the solution to fear is to have no thoughts? Can one choose to never have any thoughts? If so, is this actually a functional state?

Now realize that any latent fear you may have had, like failing your college course or your driving test, may still exist as a possibility and reside in the background of your memory. But in that moment of selfless staring at the object, the fear was gone. Was it because the thoughts of fear became suspended from consciousness during the staring exercise? If so, learn from that fact. An then work with that learned belief in the emptiness of fear when it arises in your everyday life situations. We may in fact fail our driving test, but will worrisome or fearful thoughts about the test improve the likelihood for success? So what value is the fear, which is optional?

Aren’t the thoughts around fear merely bursts of energy that have no real substance or power, unless we falsely believe in their realness. Do we mistakenly believe our thoughts to be true? If you are standing five feet away from a wild grizzly bear, do you need a "thought" from the mind to warn you of the danger? So why would you believe in a mere imaginary fear (thought) of a bear when no bear is in front of you. Does that sound silly to you? So why do we become fearful from a mere thought?
The value of fear is in the ability to intelligently respond. If there is the likelihood of failing the driving test, perhaps more study or practice may be needed.
If a grizzly presents itself, you WILL have a thought to warn you of the danger. The thought will go something like 'That's not a squirrel, it's a grizzly bear, and I know that grizzly bears are likely to have me for lunch and so I better move fast.' The body will instantly respond to this fear by mainlining some adrenaline so you can run like a bat out of hell.
If you are about to go hiking in an area in which bears are commonly seen, some kind of preparation and forethought may be wise even though there is no bear in front of you.
Yes, we can become fearful from a mere thought beyond the thought of preparation or action, but this is not because the thought of a potential bear encounter is not true, it's because the thought that you are the one encountering the bear is not true.
And is the riveted stare devoid of a “self” during that staring process? Examine why that is. If you explore this intently, you may discover directly the nature and emptiness of the fear itself.
The falsity of the self identification may be discovered, yes, but not the emptiness of the fear. However, not thinking about the self does not prove that there is no self to think about. The belief that there is a self is simply being ignored for a little while. It's actually still present and quite spontaneously generating thoughts and fears that cannot be held back for long by staring blankly.

To the issue of "What is the worst that could happen?", I could come up with any number of horrific scenarios that would curl anybody's mind-identified toes.

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ashley72
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Re: Help with fear?

Post by ashley72 » Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:57 am

Have you heard about MC2 method for anxiety sufferers? http://www.mc2method.com/full/index-anx ... xietypanic

Its an audio program that may help you to become more present. Its designed to make you more aware of your inner-body during fearful situations. It helps take your attention away from the fear stories (mind-moments) and gives you practical ways of focussing your attention on the inner body.

From my own personal experience, trying to be present in fearful situations is extremely difficult... because the mind usually pulls you further away from the present moment. Thoughts become very powerful and fire rapidly in your mind. You become so gripped in fear, you can't even respond to a simple question. Which is a sure sign that you are not being attentive to the other person. Its almost like the mind has temporarily taken you over and shut you down from paying any attention to anything other than the fear story in your head. Inner body awareness is very important in this fearful state... its one of the very practical ways of overcoming the minds hold on you.

garuda
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Re: Help with fear?

Post by garuda » Tue Mar 08, 2011 2:34 am

RettaHB wrote:I know about being present. I know that fear is the unknown and abstract future. So why does it continue to consume me?
garuda wrote:Isn’t it the thought about “knowing it” followed by your “belief in it” that gives "fear" the power over you? Try dropping the intellectual “knowing” and the mental label called “fear” that is couched in the thought of “knowing” and see what happens.
enigma wrote: How does one drop knowledge and belief? Is this something one can choose to do?
It is not so easy to do. But with practice, if one is determined not to hold on to the belief, it can eventually be dropped. Did you ever believe in Santa Claus? Do you now? So what happened to your belief?

It's not always easy! Don't we all initially mis-identify with the false ego we have been conditioned to believe in all these years, instead of with our true Self? Trying to disbelieve in the ego you have believed in all these years, is no easy task. We like our ego. In fact, it's the only thing we ever believed we were, and of course the body also. How could we possibly dis-believe in ourselves? That belief, in fact, is what causes most of our suffering, does it not? At least that is what the teachings tell us. The only way to find out if this is true, is to try it for ourselves... drop the belief that we are the false ego. It's not easy. But some of the fortunate ones have done this.
enigma wrote: Okay, so without thought, there is no fear. So the solution to fear is to have no thoughts? Can one choose to never have any thoughts? If so, is this actually a functional state?
There's nothing inherently wrong with having thoughts. Most of them are natural, but many are also unnecessary for our successful functioning and survival. But the answer to your question is that there is no need to believe that the thought is real. Is there any real substance or solidity to your cascading, fleeting thoughts? When you are in the safety of your house, is your thought of a grizzly bear, actually the grizzly bear itself? No, it merely a label or symbol we use to represent a bear in our conversations. So should that thought create fear? It's a thought of a bear, not the bear itself. So where is the legitimate fear?

So you don't have to choose to have no thoughts, but merely don't put belief or credibility in the thoughts. I use this experiment not to convince you to stop thinking. But rather to show you that if you train your mind (but not force your mind) to focus on the contents of the present now moment in front of you this very moment, then the discursive thoughts will be held in suspension and will not interfere with your awareness or distract you from the necessary thoughts you actual need in the present moment of your attentive awareness... like: "I must find my car keys." Nothing wrong with that. You need the keys, so that's a necessary and useful thought. We don't stifle those thoughts, they are needed.

enigma wrote:The value of fear is in the ability to intelligently respond. If there is the likelihood of failing the driving test, perhaps more study or practice may be needed.
I don't believe this is true. You can be concerned about your driving test without entertaining any fear. The fear is optional. If there's fear, then the ego is likely anticipating embarrassment or a blemished image of itself and is resisting that threat by invoking fear. Even Tolle states that the fear is pointless and unnecessary. He mentions this in his book and on the Oprah Webcast.
enigma wrote: If a grizzly presents itself, you WILL have a thought to warn you of the danger. The thought will go something like 'That's not a squirrel, it's a grizzly bear, and I know that grizzly bears are likely to have me for lunch and so I better move fast.' The body will instantly respond to this fear by mainlining some adrenaline so you can run like a bat out of hell.
If you are about to go hiking in an area in which bears are commonly seen, some kind of preparation and forethought may be wise even though there is no bear in front of you.
Yes, we can become fearful from a mere thought beyond the thought of preparation or action, but this is not because the thought of a potential bear encounter is not true, it's because the thought that you are the one encountering the bear is not true.
I disagree here again. The moment you square off with a bear, in that split second instant, the body will actually shoot the adrenaline before any thoughts of escape enter the mind. The consciousness reacts faster than the mind. And the body reacts instantly; it takes a second or two (while running) for the mind to construct a thought around the fear. There is fear in that instant, but is in the consciousness of the body, not the mind. In fact, the shock of the surprise of seeing the bear in that first split-second, actually stops the mind dead for a moment. But the body reacts anyway. It takes time for the mind to catch up. Sounds weird, I know; but ask a neurologist how the sequence actually plays out.

Consider this carefully: You are dusting your mother's china cabinet. Your hand accidently bumps the $30,000 Ming vase on top of the cabinet. The consciousness in your body (pure Consciousness) will instantly snatch the vase mid-air before it hits the ground and without a single thought. Because there is no time to formulate the thought, yet you lunge to catch the vase. Then... then a split second AFTER you have rescued the falling vase, your mind realizes what would have happen had your body not responded instantly, and then the mind becomes fearful of what mother would have said, and your heart then begins pounding strong for a moment or two, as you gasp over what could have happened...$30,000! But all this happens AFTER you snatch the vase. The thoughts followed the knee-jerk reaction to grab the vase. Only a half second maybe, but later. This fact has been proven in a lab.
enigma wrote: 1) The falsity of the self identification may be discovered, yes, but not the emptiness of the fear. 2) However, not thinking about the self does not prove that there is no self to think about. 3) The belief that there is a self is simply being ignored for a little while. 4) It's actually still present and quite spontaneously generating thoughts and fears that cannot be held back for long by staring blankly.
Regarding your first sentence. Isn’t it the thought that carried the fear into (c)onsciousness and which is reinforced by our belief in the thought as being real? So if the thought is empty, isn’t its corresponding fear also empty. If it isn’t empty, can we find its color, weight, size, shape, taste, or texture?

Your second sentence. Isn’t the factor that gives rise to the self, in fact a thought that believes that a self exists? Where is the self without the thought of there even being a self? The entire I-self structure comes into being starting with the subtle “I” thought which enters the (c)onsciousness just after the deep-dreamless-sleep or just after awaking from sleep. Without the thought and belief, the ego-self will not exist as we once knew it. I doubt I can convince you of this with mere words. You will likely argue that I am wrong. It will likely take a teacher you believe in to convince you. Or maybe I am wrong.

Your third sentence. True. It is being ignored. So does it really still exist when you stop ignoring it? Well, sort of, if you again continue to believe in it and you still falsely identify with the ego which you belief is you from your conditioning. Else, no, if you see through the false belief that you are that ego self --- by virtue of your mistaken thoughts and belief in it. The stare is not necessarily designed to see through to the falsity of the ego in this experiment here; you’re right, it is only temporary to show you don’t exist so long as there is no thought/belief in it --- staring or no staring. But technically, if you ignore it completely, it is gone for the duration of your ignoring.

You claim it’s still there during “ignoring” simply because you still believe it to be a permanent entity separate from the thoughts that give rise to it. I think the confusion comes from assuming the ego is like the brain or some body part you get used to associating with it to the point you believe it is actually part of you. But the sages claim that neither the body or the small ego-self-mind is our true Self. Surf the forum and you’ll discover that many of the seasoned practitioners here believe from their own direct experience that our (the) true Self is the mere pristine Consciousness that remains when the false self is exposed and seen through. The veil evaporates and the true You is revealed. Or at least that’s what they say; but how do you know whether those guys with those blue apples next to their names really know what they are talking about? And you must determine for yourself whether that understanding is true for you also, or not. Only direct experience will absolutely confirm this fact to your our satisfaction. Until then, you must either trust it intellectually or not believe it at all.

The fourth. You’re probably right with regard to the average person. Because it’s difficult to hold the stare with an empty mind for any length of time. But if you become very concentrated and focused – which takes practice – then the mind will empty. And when empty there is no sense of ego. It seems like it’s still there when we speculate about it intellectually, but it actually isn’t in that gap of time it is ignored. And yes, it will start up again when you lose the concentration because you have not yet truly discovered yet the falsity of the ego which your years of conditioning have convinced you of its existence.

At least this is how I understand it all; I could be wrong.
enigma wrote: To the issue of "What is the worst that could happen?", I could come up with any number of horrific scenarios that would curl anybody's mind-identified toes.
I’m not sure what you are referring to in this statement. Did I make some reference to this at one time?
Recognize present awareness......... rest in that awareness..........don’t become distracted.

enigma
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Re: Help with fear?

Post by enigma » Tue Mar 08, 2011 4:34 am

enigma wrote: How does one drop knowledge and belief? Is this something one can choose to do?
It is not so easy to do. But with practice, if one is determined not to hold on to the belief, it can eventually be dropped. Did you ever believe in Santa Claus? Do you now? So what happened to your belief?
Well, the belief in Santa didn't end through my determination and practice to end it. Hehe. As I recall, it just became rather obvious through no effort on my part.
To say, "it's not easy to do" is an understatement. Actually, it's impossible to drop a belief by choosing or practice or determination. A belief is called a belief because it is believed. You didn't choose to believe it in the first place, and you can't choose to not believe it. Either you believe or you don't, and this is based on your personal knowledge and experience. Beliefs can change because something new is learned, but not because you decided it would be a good idea to not believe what you believe.

drop the belief that we are the false ego. It's not easy. But some of the fortunate ones have done this.
Nobody has ever done that.

enigma
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Re: Help with fear?

Post by enigma » Tue Mar 08, 2011 5:52 am

enigma wrote: Okay, so without thought, there is no fear. So the solution to fear is to have no thoughts? Can one choose to never have any thoughts? If so, is this actually a functional state?
T
here's nothing inherently wrong with having thoughts. Most of them are natural, but many are also unnecessary for our successful functioning and survival. But the answer to your question is that there is no need to believe that the thought is real. Is there any real substance or solidity to your cascading, fleeting thoughts? When you are in the safety of your house, is your thought of a grizzly bear, actually the grizzly bear itself? No, it merely a label or symbol we use to represent a bear in our conversations. So should that thought create fear? It's a thought of a bear, not the bear itself. So where is the legitimate fear?
I agree that many thoughts are unnecessary, but thoughts are not to be dismissed on the basis that they have no substance or solidity. Feelings also have no substance or solidity but you don't dismiss them. So how does one discriminate between useful and unnecessary thoughts?

So you don't have to choose to have no thoughts, but merely don't put belief or credibility in the thoughts. I use this experiment not to convince you to stop thinking. But rather to show you that if you train your mind (but not force your mind) to focus on the contents of the present now moment in front of you this very moment, then the discursive thoughts will be held in suspension and will not interfere with your awareness or distract you from the necessary thoughts you actual need in the present moment of your attentive awareness... like: "I must find my car keys." Nothing wrong with that. You need the keys, so that's a necessary and useful thought. We don't stifle those thoughts, they are needed.
Okay, thanks for clarifying.

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Re: Help with fear?

Post by enigma » Tue Mar 08, 2011 6:12 am

enigma wrote:The value of fear is in the ability to intelligently respond. If there is the likelihood of failing the driving test, perhaps more study or practice may be needed.
I don't believe this is true. You can be concerned about your driving test without entertaining any fear. The fear is optional. If there's fear, then the ego is likely anticipating embarrassment or a blemished image of itself and is resisting that threat by invoking fear. Even Tolle states that the fear is pointless and unnecessary. He mentions this in his book and on the Oprah Webcast.
What's the difference between being concerned and being afraid? What is it that keeps you from walking off the edge of a cliff to see what it feels like? Is this concern? Fear is what motivates the survival activities of all sentient beings, so I would not call it pointless and unnecessary. We may be able to discriminate between the fear that motivates one to run from a lion, and the fearful thoughts of a potential lion attack while riding the subway, but how can we call all fear pointless and unnecessary?

enigma
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Re: Help with fear?

Post by enigma » Tue Mar 08, 2011 6:31 am

enigma wrote: 1) The falsity of the self identification may be discovered, yes, but not the emptiness of the fear. 2) However, not thinking about the self does not prove that there is no self to think about. 3) The belief that there is a self is simply being ignored for a little while. 4) It's actually still present and quite spontaneously generating thoughts and fears that cannot be held back for long by staring blankly.

Regarding your first sentence. Isn’t it the thought that carried the fear into (c)onsciousness and which is reinforced by our belief in the thought as being real? So if the thought is empty, isn’t its corresponding fear also empty. If it isn’t empty, can we find its color, weight, size, shape, taste, or texture?
The thought that a lion is chasing you may be as real as it gets. You can tell yourself the story that it's somehow empty because it doesn't weigh anything, but the lion isn't interested in such logic.
Your second sentence. Isn’t the factor that gives rise to the self, in fact a thought that believes that a self exists? Where is the self without the thought of there even being a self? The entire I-self structure comes into being starting with the subtle “I” thought which enters the (c)onsciousness just after the deep-dreamless-sleep or just after awaking from sleep. Without the thought and belief, the ego-self will not exist as we once knew it. I doubt I can convince you of this with mere words. You will likely argue that I am wrong. It will likely take a teacher you believe in to convince you. Or maybe I am wrong.
Sure, but what I said is that not thinking about the self doesn't prove there is no self to think about. It could be that there is, but you just aren't thinking about it.
Your third sentence. True. It is being ignored. So does it really still exist when you stop ignoring it? Well, sort of, if you again continue to believe in it and you still falsely identify with the ego which you belief is you from your conditioning.
Right, ignoring it does not alter the belief. That's all I'm saying.



You claim it’s still there during “ignoring” simply because you still believe it to be a permanent entity separate from the thoughts that give rise to it.
I made no such claim.



The fourth. You’re probably right with regard to the average person. Because it’s difficult to hold the stare with an empty mind for any length of time. But if you become very concentrated and focused – which takes practice – then the mind will empty. And when empty there is no sense of ego. It seems like it’s still there when we speculate about it intellectually, but it actually isn’t in that gap of time it is ignored. And yes, it will start up again when you lose the concentration because you have not yet truly discovered yet the falsity of the ego which your years of conditioning have convinced you of its existence.
Yes, that was my point. Discover the falsity of ego rather than trying to stop thoughts or imagine them as pointless or weightless or choosing to stop believing. The focus on what's actually needed, without the countless diversions, is important.


enigma wrote: To the issue of "What is the worst that could happen?", I could come up with any number of horrific scenarios that would curl anybody's mind-identified toes.
I’m not sure what you are referring to in this statement. Did I make some reference to this at one time?
I was responding to a comment Eric made.

Sufilight9
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Re: Help with fear?

Post by Sufilight9 » Wed Mar 09, 2011 9:19 am

Good question and interesting discussion!

Unless I missed it in the posts, what about when the fear just shows up for no apparent reason? In my case, I would have these sudden feelings of fear show up while trying to fall asleep, they felt like mini panic attacks. Needless to say, I suffered from insomnia for over 20 years. When Enigma suggested that I observe the "fear" not get into it, let the feeling move through me without creating a "story", such as "OMG, I am gonna die!", or attribute it to an occurrence earlier during the day, the feeling would move out of my body faster. I did this for a couple of months, and before I realized, the insomnia left me. I sleep very well now. I still experience the movement of fear through my body, but its not interfering with my sleep and the fear happens less. In my case, observing it as opposed to trying to control it worked better.

However, I have other fear issues such as a sense of vulnerability which comes from childhood, and I am not yet clear how to release it, so will be watching the conversation here.
Marie
Simple kindness to one's self and all that lives is
the most powerful transformational force of all."

Dr. David R. Hawkins

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