The philosophy of Absurdism, Spirituality and Suicide

Topics related to physical, emotional and psychological forms of pain and suffering

The philosophy of Absurdism, Spirituality and Suicide

Postby honeybee88 » Fri Apr 18, 2014 9:46 pm

I am trying my hardest to stay spiritual and in alignment with God but I find myself reverting back to the Absurdist philosophy of viewing my existence, that life and existence in general is completely absurd and meaningless.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absurdism
Definition: In philosophy, "the Absurd" refers to the conflict between (a) the human tendency to seek inherent value and meaning in life and (b) the human inability to find any.

The negative situations that come up constantly in my life are literally absurd and unbelievable and I am in awe of why I am still carrying on this pointless life.

There just comes a clear realisation to me that there is just no point in carry on in such a pointless world. What is the point of sometimes feeling highly spiritual and at one with God and then at other times feeling so lost, hurt and rejected that I just want to kill myself and be out of this painful world forever.

Its like spiritual connection for me only last a couple of days then it changes back to negative state. Everything is just so changeable and up and down in this world and if I can't rely on spirituality to keep me stable and sane then there really is no point to anything.
honeybee88
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2013 8:15 am

Re: The philosophy of Absurdism, Spirituality and Suicide

Postby Webwanderer » Fri Apr 18, 2014 11:10 pm

honeybee88 wrote:I am trying my hardest to stay spiritual and in alignment with God but I find myself reverting back to the Absurdist philosophy of viewing my existence, that life and existence in general is completely absurd and meaningless.

My take is that life is indeed meaningless, or more accurate, meaning neutral - and that is a good thing. That is however, until each of us decides for ourselves what life, or any of its many ongoing events, means to us specifically. Generally, when someones says that life is meaningless, such as you have here, underlying that is a judgment or condemnation that something in life sucks. Maybe lots of things. This judgment is a form of applied meaning. So it's more likely that life is not meaningless to you. Rather it holds a rather negative meaning reflecting your painful experiences in life.

Definition: In philosophy, "the Absurd" refers to the conflict between (a) the human tendency to seek inherent value and meaning in life and (b) the human inability to find any.

The key word here is "inherent". But if you could choose what life means, or any of its events and conditions - and it directly effected your experience in life - how would you choose? Would one consider it absurd to choose a meaning that made the experience worse than it otherwise might have been?

The negative situations that come up constantly in my life are literally absurd and unbelievable and I am in awe of why I am still carrying on this pointless life.

Can you be certain that life is pointless and not simply that you do not see what it actually is? Could it be that by stating with certainty that life is pointless that you set mental/emotional conditions that both obscure your seeing life's true value, and creating more of the apparent pointlessness that you believe to be true?

What is the point of sometimes feeling highly spiritual and at one with God and then at other times feeling so lost, hurt and rejected that I just want to kill myself and be out of this painful world forever.

This is a fair question. But is also begs and additional question. Is your stated interest in the 'point' rhetorical, or do you genuinely want to know the answer?

One might ask how one person can find their way out of such emotional pain and into a more joyful and happy life, while another stays mired in negativity. But again, the questioning cannot be rhetorical. It must be genuine with an openness and willingness to actively explore for an answer.

Its like spiritual connection for me only last a couple of days then it changes back to negative state.

The conditioning, call it entrainment, that is built up over our early life can be quite negative and have considerable momentum. Recognition of spiritual assets is a good first step, but the momentum of our negative conditioning is not so quickly dispersed. The creative energy that flows into our life experience will flow into the focus of our attention over time. That said, every time we get caught up in a negative perspective, that focus of our attention reinforces that negative perspective and creates yet more painful experiences. It has momentum.

Everything is just so changeable and up and down in this world and if I can't rely on spirituality to keep me stable and sane then there really is no point to anything.

It's a well worn truism that we create our own reality. But it's a cooperation with between our human perspective and our greater true nature. What one point of view finds pointless another find value. Even in our human perspective we have free will to choose how we perceive events. And it is that choice of perception that creates our experience. That said, all of our present choices are not deliberate and with an understanding of how they effect how we feel. Many are on auto mode born of past strongly held judgments that are often first on the scene.

Our task in recreating how we experience events and conditions, is to recognize the automatic reactions that bring us pain and choose new meanings that work toward our best interests and enjoyment of life. It can be done if one is willing to put in the conscious effort to recognize and work with the process. Meaning is going to be applied in any case. It will simply be out of our existing historical belief structures, or ones we choose consciously for our best interests.

WW
User avatar
Webwanderer
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 6302
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 12:03 am

Re: The philosophy of Absurdism, Spirituality and Suicide

Postby smiileyjen101 » Sat Apr 19, 2014 4:04 am

Honeybee said:
Its like spiritual connection for me only last a couple of days then it changes back to negative state. Everything is just so changeable and up and down in this world and if I can't rely on spirituality to keep me stable and sane then there really is no point to anything.


One thing you can hitch your kite to is ~ this too will pass is true of everything. I like what Webby says, you make your own meaning of things and every time any thing arises you can change the story of it and your relating with/in it

“Between stimulus and response, there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.”
― Viktor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning


If your 'spiritual connection' does not embrace all that this life, this world and the amazing interactions within it, holds then it is more an avoidance of what is, rather than acceptance, enjoyment or enthusiasm about it, which ET illustrates well in A New Earth.

We choose either unconsciously in fear and ego, or awarely in love (gratitude & generosity). If we choose to make enemy, obstacle, means to an end of things, people and situations then yes of course we are going to create suffering, for self and others in resistance to, rather than flowing with, what is.

When you have had enough of that, sure, let it go. By that I mean the resistance, the judging negatively and the perspective that creates the suffering. What if everything that arises is 'okay'. Then you find the neutrality - the equilibrium and balance within it and build awarely upon it. It might be 'Okay, a tsunami has devastated everything around me. Okay, now what shall / can I do in response?' I can argue with it until the cows come home, but that would only create unnecessary suffering. Or, I can embrace what is and work with/in it.

“Ultimately, man should not ask what the meaning of his life is, but rather must recognize that it is he who is asked. In a word, each man is questioned by life; and he can only answer to life by answering for his own life; to life he can only respond by being responsible.”
― Viktor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning

I love this quote ^ Being responsible is enacting what one is response able to do, taking responsibility in answering life's questions - who are you - who do you deem/choose to be in this experience. How do you choose to show up?

On another tack, looking to death to solve your problems might be a little presumptuous, a little like looking over the fence and thinking the grass is greener on the other side not by any effort of our neighbour (if consciousness survives).

M Scott Peck wrote in novel form a very interesting illustration of the experience of death in In Heaven As On Earth.
Here's the thing that this book illustrates for us - if we take our consciousness with us we take our choices too, and again we have the opportunity to set aside those things that cause our suffering, or not. If we can do it there, why not here?

I don't mean to appear cruel and insensitive, but there are elements in that book that are seriously funny in the choices that his characters make to not set aside their judgements of self and others, and create their own versions of purgatory and hell by holding onto the things that create their suffering, here and there.

If we are not happy, what are we waiting for? Why hold ourselves in purgatory saying I will be happy when / and only if...

If not right now, how will we be happy then?
If we can find peace with what is 'then', we can also do so 'now'.

And if we think this is hell - the only thing that creates that is our thinking of it - so what will change on death of the body? In the novel those in the experience of hell don't realise or don't want to give up the resistance or the beliefs that create their own personal version of hell, even though they know they have the choice to leave it any time they want.

I would suggest honeybee, if you haven't read that book do so, and consider the experience your character might choose in the situation.

If you're looking for a way to understand man's search for meaning, Viktor Frankl's book with that title is a little gem.
“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”
― Viktor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning


“When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves.”
― Viktor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning



```````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````

“What is to give light must endure burning.”
― Viktor E. Frankl

I pay homage to the candle that is life lived in acceptance, enjoyment and enthusiasm.

In gratitude and generosity I am humbled by the opportunities to be all that I can be in answer to life's questions and experiences, with full responsible participation in awareness, capacity and willingness.

(and then I think, crap... for sure it's going to make me feel like peeing my pants as more opportunities arise!! :wink: )
It's all not so serious that we can't laugh at it and ourselves along the way.
Our rights start deep within our humanity; they end where another's begin~~ SmileyJen
http://www.balancinginfluences.com
User avatar
smiileyjen101
 
Posts: 3688
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2010 3:44 am


Return to Pain and Suffering

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron