Adiction

OBE's, NDE's, lucid dreams, and the like...

Adiction

Postby Clarejasmine » Sat Sep 06, 2014 2:14 am

Smoking
I have been a smoker a long time, in every other way I am healthy. I drink only occasionally, eat healthily exercise but I have continued to smoke. It frustrates me that I can't seem to stop. I've tried but have always succumbed again eventually. I wondered why? What positive can be gained from this revolting habit? But of course you say, it's addictive your body forms a dependency. But I have quit for years before, gotten to the point where the smell disgusts me, but then something happens (a death in the family is the most recent example of when I started the habit again, 4 years ago). I no longer had the addiction, nicotine had been removed from my blood stream long before but these traumas cause me to pick up a packet and inhale. So why?
The reason I am posting this here is that I had a breakthrough in regards to this, while lighting a cigarette I realised I was totally focused on that. The spark of the lighter, the taste of the smoke, the feeling of it's chemicals entering my blood stream, the smoke dancing before me eyes. I totally conscious on all of this and my mind was still. When I smoke it's because I'm desperately trying to be in the moment, it gives me the same sense of calm as (well not the same as it is also harmful to me) focusing on the here and now would do but more instant.
Well anyway I feel it was my light bulb moment for the evening and thought I'd share. now with this knowledge I really think my efforts to quit again will be more fruitful. Find other healthier ways to quiet my mind and find solace in the moment.
Thank you and have a lovely day/ morning/afternoon/evening/night, what ever is applicable :)
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Re: Adiction

Postby rachMiel » Sat Sep 06, 2014 3:13 am

Clarejasmine wrote:When I smoke it's because I'm desperately trying to be in the moment,

Or could it be that you (brain) are desperately trying to get a nicotine rush/high ... and presence is a kind of side effect, a fringe benefit? (I don't know the answer to this, just wondering out loud.)

Of all the drugs I've ever tried -- not that many, especially since I came of age in the hippie time -- I only ever LOVED two: quaaludes and nicotine (snuff). So I totally get your joie de Nicotiana tabacum. ;-)
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily ...
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Re: Adiction

Postby Phil2 » Sat Sep 06, 2014 9:10 am

Clarejasmine wrote:The reason I am posting this here is that I had a breakthrough in regards to this, while lighting a cigarette I realised I was totally focused on that. The spark of the lighter, the taste of the smoke, the feeling of it's chemicals entering my blood stream, the smoke dancing before me eyes. I totally conscious on all of this and my mind was still. When I smoke it's because I'm desperately trying to be in the moment, it gives me the same sense of calm as (well not the same as it is also harmful to me) focusing on the here and now would do but more instant.


Right beyond the physical effect of nicotine in the body (as an exciting drug), there is the 'ritual' of smoking hence smoking becomes a means to be fully present and enjoy this moment of quietness, this presence ... as said in another thread, all rituals have an effect to bring us back to the present moment and you can find rituals in all religions for this reason ... also rituals can take the form of obsessive compulsive disorders, like washing hands hundreds times per day or eating disorders etc ...
"What irritates us about others is an opportunity to learn on ourselves"
(Carl Jung)
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Re: Adiction

Postby Clarejasmine » Sat Sep 06, 2014 10:37 am

Rachmiel, yes indeed before the age of 21 I tried most things but luckily for me none of these proved addictive for me, was more an experiment a teenage curiosity. I agree that the craving for nicotine is hard to rid yourself of but, I have managed to rid myself of that in the past but been drawn back nonetheless.
Phil that is fascinating and I will try to find the thread you mention.
Thanks :)
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Re: Adiction

Postby Phil2 » Sat Sep 06, 2014 11:13 am

Clarejasmine wrote: Phil that is fascinating and I will try to find the thread you mention.
Thanks :)


Sorry, I referred to a discussion I had in another forum.

Here's what was said there:

So what is an addiction exactly ?

??

Why is addiction so compulsive ? so irrepressible ?

We must understand the role of addiction in our lives ...

Addiction is a 'habit', right ? Something we 'do' compulsively, kind of compulsive obsession ... but why ? Why do we 'fill' our lives with habits ? Isn't it a way to 'escape' something, some boredom ? some pain ?

Are we so afraid of leaving the 'doing' mode and remain in the 'being' mode ? That we always have to 'do' something ... even the most harmful 'habits' like addictions ...

Why is it so difficult for some persons to remain alone, doing nothing ... we know that for some persons meditation is very difficult ...

Why ? What is it we want to escape ? Is there some hidden fear over there ?

??




...

ok, so we have some pain, and we 'cover' this pain with our addictions, right ? We cannot face our pain, and we find an easy escape in addictions ...

How does this work exactly ?

We can see how it works for alcohol or drugs, they stupefy us, and we become insensitive and we forget our pain ... but what happens with cigarettes ? We don't become insensitive when smoking ... same with sexual addiction ... or any form of 'entertainment' or excitement or 'pleasure' (like food disorders) ...

??




I have a feeling that smoking is a very adaptable addiction in this regard, and that the psyche can assign meanings to smoking, or find meanings in smoking, according to its needs at the time. So this becomes the "crutch", and when quitting, the psyche is suddenly faced with reality (along with drug dependency).




Interesting. I wonder if this is not the case with any compulsive habit or 'ritual' like eating disorders or compulsive obsessions ... our mind tends to give a meaning to those rituals and this offers us kind of 'protection' ... after all, all religions have their rituals too ...



Also when mind is focussed on rituals, thought cannot wander around and cannot produce negativity and harm us ... it is a way to 'distract' ourselves from our painful thoughts (which is suffering and can lead to 'depression') ... some kind of escape from reality finally ...
"What irritates us about others is an opportunity to learn on ourselves"
(Carl Jung)
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Re: Adiction

Postby Clarejasmine » Sat Sep 06, 2014 11:30 am

Wow!!! Yes that is so true! The most recent time I seriously tried to break the habit I became, tense, tearful and terribly sad and instead of working on this I gave up trying. It was like I not only had the physical need to smoke but an even stronger psychological need, which I then tried to fight against, where I probably should of delved deeper.
I think my coming to an understanding of what that psychological attachment is really about, is key to my success in giving up.
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Re: Adiction

Postby Phil2 » Sat Sep 06, 2014 11:59 am

Clarejasmine wrote:I think my coming to an understanding of what that psychological attachment is really about, is key to my success in giving up.


Yes, a thorough understanding of your dependency is needed so it can be dropped without any effort ... all efforts to break addictions generally fail because the root causes have not been clarified or understood ... so the effort is only a 'resistance' to 'what is' (ie. the addiction) ... and as Jung said: what you resist persists ...

The unconscious must become conscious ... there lies freedom ...
"What irritates us about others is an opportunity to learn on ourselves"
(Carl Jung)
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Re: Adiction

Postby Clarejasmine » Sat Sep 06, 2014 1:56 pm

That's definitely food for thought. In my most successful attempt to quit I was in a really positive space emotionally, I managed to stop cold turkey and felt it was easy and didn't smoke again for a couple of years.
I will have to sit and ponder as to what drives the need, and figure out the root. As I've mentioned the ritual of it in part but also why this specific attachment, I would be extremely grateful if any readers have any useful suggestions in a good way of exploring this further.
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Re: Adiction

Postby Phil2 » Sat Sep 06, 2014 2:07 pm

Clarejasmine wrote:That's definitely food for thought. In my most successful attempt to quit I was in a really positive space emotionally, I managed to stop cold turkey and felt it was easy and didn't smoke again for a couple of years.
I will have to sit and ponder as to what drives the need, and figure out the root. As I've mentioned the ritual of it in part but also why this specific attachment, I would be extremely grateful if any readers have any useful suggestions in a good way of exploring this further.


Did you try the electronic cigarette (you can smoke with or without nicotine) ? it would at least help you to identify if the need comes nicotine or from the ritual itself ?
"What irritates us about others is an opportunity to learn on ourselves"
(Carl Jung)
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Re: Adiction

Postby Clarejasmine » Sat Sep 06, 2014 5:33 pm

Yes I am using one, but it helps only slightly. Still miss cigarettes and end up only cutting down to three or four (proper cigarettes) a day with e-cig rather than cutting it out completely. So yes think it's more to do with the act than purely the nicotine.
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Re: Adiction

Postby Phil2 » Sat Sep 06, 2014 5:37 pm

Clarejasmine wrote:Yes I am using one, but it helps only slightly. Still miss cigarettes and end up only cutting down to three or four (proper cigarettes) a day with e-cig rather than cutting it out completely. So yes think it's more to do with the act than purely the nicotine.


Then the e-cig could satisfy you totally, no ? So what is it in real cigarettes that you are missing when smoking e-cig ? Why don't you throw away the cigarettes for good ?

??

May I try something else then, just thinking loudly here ?

What about saying that smoking cigarettes, which everyone knows to be harmful for health, would be kind of self assertion, an act of 'freedom' ... a challenge to all those people around (parents, doctors, teachers, all those 'authorities' around) who know better than me what is good or what is bad for me ... a little bit like a child who would infringe the rules just to see what happens ...

??
"What irritates us about others is an opportunity to learn on ourselves"
(Carl Jung)
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Re: Adiction

Postby karmarider » Sat Sep 06, 2014 8:40 pm

Allen Carr.

http://www.theeasywaytostopsmoking.com/webcast.aspx

It really was easy and I never looked back.

I suggest the official and full webcast. I know people who've watched partial videos on youtube and have not been successful at quiting.
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Re: Adiction

Postby Clarejasmine » Sun Sep 07, 2014 11:16 am

I'm not sure that fits in my case Phil, yes I was quite a rebellious teen but managed to get that out of my system quite early. When I smoke it feels more like I'm feeding a need like someone with food addiction who craves chocolate. The fact that my father was the smoker in the family when I was little and used to blow smoke rings for me (this was the 70s and obviously people were more relaxed with the whole smoking in front of children thing) is quite relevant. When I first started smoking (at 13 I am now 40) one of the first things I did was learn to blow smoke rings. It feels like there is a lack (as Mr Tolle would say) and I'm using cigarettes to fill it. When I try to quit I feel like a child whose had their sweets taken away, I miss them like an old friend it's quite weird.

Thank you karmarider I will definitely give that a watch.
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Re: Adiction

Postby Onceler » Sun Sep 07, 2014 1:45 pm

Research shows that the younger the brain, the more adaptive it is to behavior and addictions.....so, at 13, the brain adapts vigorously to the habit of smoking and to the chemical/neurological pathways laid down (neuroplasticity). The earlier these habits are started the "better" the brain adapts to them, whether it's smoking, alcohol (at 13, Jack London drank adult fisherman under the table in Alaska) child soldiering, or positive experiences like sports, playing the violin, etc.

Any negative behavioral pattern, using addictive chemicals and started before the age of 16 is tough to quit, but, of course, not impossible. It probably explains your difficulties in quitting and the easy return to the habit....the neural pathways for smoking have been strongly fixed.

This is my problem with the legalization of marijuanna. I have no problem with adults using it and believe it's probably a far better alternative than alcohol, but I'm afraid that kids will be able to get their hands on it more easily. The young brain adapts to chemicals and addictive patterns very quickly and marijuanna use among kids, especially kids under 16, can drop the IQ by as much as 10 points and create a pattern of addiction not seen in adult users.

So, yeah, I work with kids and could easily start a rant about the growing tread to adultify kids by having them do whatever adults do, whether it's shooting an automatic rifle at nine or wearing make up at 7 or 8 and chatting on an iPhone at 2.....I recently rode my bike past a local driving range and saw a toddler, no more than 3 and barely able to walk, let alone swing a club, dressed in golf clothes just like his dad valiantly trying to hit a golf ball......
Be present, be pleasant.
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Re: Adiction

Postby Phil2 » Sun Sep 07, 2014 2:11 pm

Onceler wrote:Research shows that the younger the brain, the more adaptive it is to behavior and addictions.....so, at 13, the brain adapts vigorously to the habit of smoking and to the chemical/neurological pathways laid down (neuroplasticity). The earlier these habits are started the "better" the brain adapts to them, whether it's smoking, alcohol (at 13, Jack London drank adult fisherman under the table in Alaska) child soldiering, or positive experiences like sports, playing the violin, etc.



Maybe so, but there is much more in addictions than just a habit engraved in the brain ... there is something very deep, something buried in the unconscious, repressed by our 'defense system' ...

Addictions are an avoidance of pain, all addictions are techniques to escape the necessity to face those pains ... either by stupefying us (like alcohol or drugs) or by distracting us (like cigarettes or ritual obsessions) ...

So we have to find the deep root and cause of all addictions to get rid of them once for all ...
"What irritates us about others is an opportunity to learn on ourselves"
(Carl Jung)
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