How important is to follow STRICTLY precepts ?

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Ervin
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How important is to follow STRICTLY precepts ?

Post by Ervin » Sat Jul 08, 2017 12:20 pm

Hi everyone.

Ok, now in Buddhism you have precepts, they are as follows: No killing, no stealing, no lying, no sexual misconduct, no alcohol/ or drugs, as aded recently.

Now, do you think that it's very important to be very strict in upholding these precepts? Ie, do you think that we should let's say never get drunk, but I mean like never.

Also, which are the most important precept/s to you? To me I would say that they are all sort of equal, however, I do see lying as particularly bad.

What are your thoughts on the subject?

Thanks

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Webwanderer
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Re: How important is to follow STRICTLY precepts ?

Post by Webwanderer » Sun Jul 09, 2017 4:44 am

I think it best to ignore all the precepts you listed and any others like them. One's best focus of attention is to simply feel God in your heart and let that feeling be your guide. Stealing and killing and lying comes from a rationalization and belief that it's somehow alright. Considered from the feeling of God/Source/True Nature, as a guide, the essence of that rationalization is more likely laid bare.

I read many years ago that in the earliest versions of the Commandments that they were all preceded by the phrase 'If you have God in your heart...' and then the word 'shall' instead of 'shalt'. What you get is 'If you have God in your heart, thou shall not kill.' They are not so much commandments as guides to better living.

Consider that direction with commandments and precepts of all kinds. And then consider the different effect on one's perception to focus more on the feeling of God than the resistance to some stated 'sin'.

WW

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Mystic
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Re: How important is to follow STRICTLY precepts ?

Post by Mystic » Mon Jul 10, 2017 9:20 am

Webwanderer wrote: What you get is 'If you have God in your heart, thou shall not kill.' They are not so much commandments as guides to better living.
I agree with you, that this is true. :D Commandments are not actually commands per se but they are more like helpful clues and pointers to awakening. The awe and felt oneness of being with all life. The law of universal oneness means that as we think and do unto others, so we think and do unto our-self. This is also referred to as the law of attraction. Thoughts and emotions are vibrations and vibrations in one's inner space resonate with similar forms in the world.

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EnterZenFromThere
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Re: How important is to follow STRICTLY precepts ?

Post by EnterZenFromThere » Wed Jul 12, 2017 8:32 pm

The version of the commandments you describe WW feels so much more true than the one we commonly hear. It has a totally different feel to it and rings true with the words of someone living in the revelation of God's Love.

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Webwanderer
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Re: How important is to follow STRICTLY precepts ?

Post by Webwanderer » Wed Jul 12, 2017 9:31 pm

Yeah, it kind of takes the need to resist out of it. There is a natural feel of openness to it that says I don't need rules to do what's right. All I really need is a clear sense of Source Energy.

WW

Ervin
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Re: How important is to follow STRICTLY precepts ?

Post by Ervin » Sun Sep 23, 2018 1:13 pm

Thanks WW and others.

I would like to point out that I have noticed that I have a habit of asking/ contamplaiting traditional style questions. Like questions about Gods powers or lets call them precepts or commandments or whatever. Which is why a lot don’t necessarily engage in answering/ elaborating them.

I would like to say that reading Eckharts teachings has brought me peace in some of my most difficult times that I have been through. I hope that Eckhart T is right, because I don’t want not only me, but no one to suffer forever, which is what for instance Christianity and Islam teach.

I have been told by one of my former psychiatric nurses in the past that I am a masochist. When I said that I don’t think anyone is a masochist, he said pretty much not like wanting cuting of of arms and legs, I thought that’s not me. But is it?

Thanks

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Re: How important is to follow STRICTLY precepts ?

Post by Webwanderer » Sun Sep 23, 2018 3:47 pm

Ervin wrote:
Sun Sep 23, 2018 1:13 pm
I don’t want not only me, but no one to suffer forever, which is what for instance Christianity and Islam teach.
Religions such as these tend to take the carrot and stick approach. The stick is to instill fear rather than understanding. They also promote their own exclusivity. It helps keep the followers in line and in the church. Whatever hell we may experience is of our own creation. An infinite and unconditionally loving creator, expressing Itself as extensions in worlds such as ours, is unlikely to condemn elements of It-Self born to explore experiential possibilities.

Right and wrong are inherently human creations. Unconditionally loving means just that. There is no judgment or condemnation beyond our own. We are meant to be explorers of human experience - and hopefully grow from such explorations.
I have been told by one of my former psychiatric nurses in the past that I am a masochist. When I said that I don’t think anyone is a masochist, he said pretty much not like wanting cuting of of arms and legs, I thought that’s not me. But is it?
A masochist by definition is one who 'enjoys' pain. Just because we can be self-abusive doesn't mean we enjoy it. More likely we think we deserve it. A true sign of evolving consciousness is to get beyond self-judgment and into acceptance of our actions and building upon them to make us better. Recognition and acceptance of our true nature is the key to this growth.

WW

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