Do you recomend any meditation for a complete beginner?

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qqssxx
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Do you recomend any meditation for a complete beginner?

Post by qqssxx » Tue Apr 10, 2018 12:41 am

It is very hard to listen to my thoughts, most of the time I end up going with them and I can rarely feel the obersver presence
Is there any meditation that improves this ability?
I think mindfulness would be very good but I want to know your opinions
P.S: do you think metta meditation would be any help?

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Webwanderer
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Re: Do you recomend any meditation for a complete beginner?

Post by Webwanderer » Tue Apr 10, 2018 4:11 pm

I recommend breathing meditations. Take slow, moderately deep, connected breaths. Closing your eyes is an option but not necessary. Focus on receptivity. Listen and observe without description, analysis or preference. Perceive all your senses in the same way. Complete receptivity without mental engagement. Be inclusive. Perceive the moment as looking in on an experience. That specifically includes an eyes open meditation. Continue to breathe through multiple breaths. Coast from time to time just being present with the environment and experience. Be receptive, intently aware, not engaging. Observe what is - free of thought. Rest here, relax into it, don't strive.

Welcome to the forum.

WW

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Re: Do you recomend any meditation for a complete beginner?

Post by kiki » Tue Apr 10, 2018 7:53 pm

I also recommend following the breath (I recommend eyes closed for beginners) with a slight variation in Webwanderer's recommendation. I'd begin by doing an eyes closed scan of the body, noticing and relaxing whatever part of your body is holding tension and then letting go of that tension. Then I'd do what WW outlined, and after a couple of minutes let your breathing pattern settle into a rhythm of its own making, not trying to consciously regulate the length of the breath in any way - just let it settle into whatever pattern it turns into. Then, just pay attention for the entire length of each inhalation and exhalation. Note the difference in the feeling of the air as it comes in and then out - its temperature and even the sound - there will be subtle differences. AND, notice the slight pause between each breath. It will be longer after the exhalation and just rest in that pause with your attention open to everything. As you continue this you may notice that pause getting longer and longer. Simply relax deeply into that pause and rest, but remaining alert to when the next cycle of breath begins, and then put total attention for the duration of in-breath and out-breath as previously described. Start with 10 minutes, twice daily if possible. If that's too much time reduce it. As you get more comfortable with the process increase the time a little bit. I'd keep it to 20 minutes per session.

When you are done, keep your eyes closed for a minute or so, stretch if you feel the need, let yourself think about whatever comes to mind, and then re-enter activity easily. Jumping right into activity after the mind and body have settled down in meditation can be jarring, sometimes causing a headache. If you find yourself getting headaches that means there has been some mental straining going on. This whole process should be strain free.

Other things to keep in mind: Never judge your meditation as good or bad; don't go into meditation with any anticipation or thought of what you want to happen, or with any intent to re-capture a previous experience. Never chastise yourself for any perceived failure. It's perfectly normal for your mind to wander off (that's part of the process), so when you notice that has happened simply return to following the breath. Consciousness is that which notices, so slipping into thought stream and then "catching" yourself when that happens is actually consciousness coming to the forefront of your attention. With regular practice you will discover that you "catch" yourself more quickly when mind wanders. This is sort of like exercising the body, but instead of muscles becoming stronger awareness of consciousness increases.

One last thing, I don't recommend meditating right after eating or if you are very hungry. If you've eaten your body is in the process of digesting your food, so it's more difficult for the body to settle down and mind to go deep. And if you are hungry the mind will be distracted by the hunger. Eat something light or drink something like orange juice, but just enough to take the edge off your hunger.
"Miss Kelly, perhaps you'd like this flower. I seem to have misplaced my buttonhole ... Miss Kelly, you know, when you wear my flower you make it look beautiful." Elwood P. Dowd
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qqssxx
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Re: Do you recomend any meditation for a complete beginner?

Post by qqssxx » Mon Apr 16, 2018 2:29 am

Thanks for the answers, I already began the practice :mrgreen:

I have a problem feeling the pain body. I can catch it when it is awaking, but when I look inside me I don't feel anything at all. I don't even know what should I feel :?
Anyway, after some seconds trying to do it I feel better. I don't know how to describe it, is like happiness, but subtle.

Another question. Can I add a mantra to the meditation you gave me? The mantra is So Hum, it is said to give many benefits but the principal point is that breath meditation is very boring, maybe the mantra can help me mantain the focus.

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Re: Do you recomend any meditation for a complete beginner?

Post by kiki » Mon Apr 16, 2018 3:34 am

Another question. Can I add a mantra to the meditation you gave me? The mantra is So Hum, it is said to give many benefits but the principal point is that breath meditation is very boring, maybe the mantra can help me mantain the focus.
Sure. I've used it myself in the past. The mind seems to need something to do, so give it a job - So on the inhale, Hum on the exhale = I am that. "That" refers to consciousness. You can even use it throughout the day while in activity.
I have a problem feeling the pain body. I can catch it when it is awaking, but when I look inside me I don't feel anything at all. I don't even know what should I feel
The pain body is simply what causes upset due to past conditioning, making it reactive/automatic. When you are feeling mental distress it will cause various physiological responses in the body that are physically and emotionally unpleasant. Simply feel what is happening without trying to resist or fight it. Allow those responses space to exist by just being with them and they will eventually dissolve all by themselves. Being patient, not resisting and nonjudgmental towards what you are experiencing is the space they need to expend their energy. Fighting against them or judging them will actually help to keep them active within you.
"Miss Kelly, perhaps you'd like this flower. I seem to have misplaced my buttonhole ... Miss Kelly, you know, when you wear my flower you make it look beautiful." Elwood P. Dowd
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