Ego is neccessary?

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A Name is a Label
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Ego is neccessary?

Post by A Name is a Label » Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:22 pm

Does this hold truth? If the ego is something that we use to navigate through our daily lives/societal functions, can we live without it? Is it a matter of balance? To observe the ego at all times, use or allow the ego to thrive when it serves a function, and to observe the ego more so when it becomes a dysfunction?


Just a thought. I notice my life is "smooth/easy" when I accept my ego; gradually strengthening my sense of self... but then I hit an ego speed bump; a disagreement, an unconscious reaction to someone/something and suddenly I am in a state of paralysis. "Do I dissolve my ego? or strengthen it?"

Balance?

Thank you

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heidi
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Re: Ego is neccessary?

Post by heidi » Mon Feb 25, 2008 8:17 pm

"Do I dissolve my ego? or strengthen it?"
Neither - you witness it and accept it, and use it when you need it to serve you, just as you witness and use your mind.
The ego is a problem only when one is identified with it, when it acts upon those egoic things like pride, envy, jealousy, indignation, (Sheesh, like the 7 deadly sins) making wars big and small.
I find myself laughing at my ego a lot, because once you start witnessing it, you will find that it's quite funny. It's only when you take it seriously that problems and suffering arise. :)
Heidi
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Re: Ego is neccessary?

Post by BrahmanEternal » Wed Feb 27, 2008 12:38 am

Id say strengthen it , if you want to have an image of yourself at least have a good one, there are lots of different self images for different situations. This is similar to labeling function i spoke about the center of mental projection is our body-ego here. So try to make the best picture of yourself you can because most of us here have some sort of self image.
Free of need to be Free.

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Re: Ego is neccessary?

Post by weichen » Thu Feb 28, 2008 6:43 am

I have a big ego, and it is geting bigger and bigger. It gets so big, that I often see myself as one entire humanity.

I feel the pain of people outside spiritual field, unable to use the suffering to ascend to the higher spiritual identity. I also feel the pain of spiritual seekers who like to have better intellectual understanding of spirituality but couldn't find such spiritual teaching on the current market.

The above collective pains are my pain, I own them. This is a nice painbody I identify with. This ownership of the collective painbody is my driving force of daily actions to
(1)help as many people to get into spiritual field as I can through giving public speeches
(2)write an intellectual book about spirituality, probably first of its kind

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Re: Ego is neccessary?

Post by Sighclone » Thu Mar 06, 2008 8:01 am

I find myself laughing at my ego a lot, because once you start witnessing it, you will find that it's quite funny. It's only when you take it seriously that problems and suffering arise. :)
Heidi makes me laugh, too. But the ego as something funny is new...I like the concept. Mine does not like to be thought of as funny. Not one bit, thank you. It says to me: "I have a great mind and I identify with it and it makes me very happy. I am not a subject for humor." Maybe people with dull little minds are much better candidates for Enlightenment.

Andy
A person is not a thing or a process, but an opening through which the universe manifests. - Martin Heidegger
There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present. - James Joyce

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Re: Ego is neccessary?

Post by Webwanderer » Thu Mar 06, 2008 2:20 pm

Sighclone wrote: Heidi makes me laugh, too. But the ego as something funny is new...I like the concept. Mine does not like to be thought of as funny. Not one bit, thank you. It says to me: "I have a great mind and I identify with it and it makes me very happy. I am not a subject for humor." Maybe people with dull little minds are much better candidates for Enlightenment.
That opens up an interersting question: what does make for a good "in"vironment for awakening? What comes to awareness is humility - the sense that I don't have all the answers, that everyone has challenges and there is no way anyone else can judge or be judged with any clarity from the limitations of the minds view of the world. A humble nature seems imparitive if one is to regain harmony with the incredible diversity of life.

That is expressed beaitifully by Heidi's forgiving laughter at her ego/mind's antics. So along with honest humility, a sense of humor is a valued asset, lest one becomes morbidly humble and adopts a "poor me" attitude more alligned with victimhood.

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Re: Ego is neccessary?

Post by Sighclone » Thu Mar 06, 2008 8:47 pm

That is expressed beaitifully by Heidi's forgiving laughter at her ego/mind's antics. So along with honest humility, a sense of humor is a valued asset, lest one becomes morbidly humble and adopts a "poor me" attitude more aligned with victimhood.
When I rejoined a Christian church 25 years ago (I've since left, of course), I remember asking the preacher - "Did Jesus have a sense of humor?" He referred me to a little book which had a few Biblical citations, by Elton Trueblood, by the way, named "The Humor in Jesus Christ" or something like that. ET has a delightful sense of humor, which is far less evident in his writings than in the videos.

Zen koan and haikus are full of disruptive humor intended to shake us out of our minds. Heidi's resume is not far away, if you click onto her website. You will note she has very impressive academic credentials. But here she is delightfully light. Bernard Shaw said: "If you want to be serious, be funny." I think heidi's comment that the ego is 'funny' is very meaningful - at least it was for me. We can strive and strive for enlightenment (like Gautama for six years of asceticism, which did not produce samadhi - that came later) - or the thousands of TM practitioners. And that is OK, because ego is sneaky and huge. But to say it is 'funny' is very special - just in that concept there is great power, heidi - thanks again.

Humility is also a powerful tool to assist Me in de-energizing the ego, thanks WW!! Humility's extreme form is victimhood, or self-flagellation - both kind of reverse-ego postures...and far from Being. But any activity which opens the ego trap is helpful...

Namaste, Andy
A person is not a thing or a process, but an opening through which the universe manifests. - Martin Heidegger
There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present. - James Joyce

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Re: Ego is neccessary?

Post by BillyPLed » Sun Mar 09, 2008 2:18 am

At a recent training in Integrative Restoration (iRest) I had a few "experiences" that seem to relate to this topic.

1) I was in a dyad with a partner and I got a sense of myself as the ego. I "took on" the ego and described it as much like wearing a mask. I then shifted to Pure Awareness and had a strong sense that the ego was not an enemy. I experienced it with a strong degree of compassion and knew that it had "served me well." I was able to appreciate it. I felt a sense of gratitude and noticed that the spaciousness of Pure Awareness and the gratitude that I was experiencing allowed me to view the ego in a way that I never had before. I felt "friendly" towards it and saw it as a friend.

2) During another dyad I experienced Pure Awareness as a loss of boundaries. I felt completely merged with all that was around me and had no sense of my physical body. At one point my partner asked me to "step back into" the experience of being a self, and I could actually feel my body re-materializing. It was as if the back of my body, the part that was "against" the floor, was retracting (drawing in) from the floor and re-forming as my body. I found myself laughing out-loud. My partner asked me what I was experiencing. I explained to the best of my ability and told her that I saw it as very humorous -- the body re-forming out of emptiness, the ego re-asserting itself -- it was all so funny to me.

Both of these experiences have helped me to see the ego -- the sense of being a separate self with a separate body -- as something to appreciate and as something to "in-joy." It is the play of form. I try not to take it so seriously anymore.
Billy in Lousiana

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Re: Ego is neccessary?

Post by Sighclone » Sun Mar 09, 2008 8:39 am

Billy -

Very helpful, interesting and amusing insights - thanks. The following is from the Parker interview in about 2002 where ET sort of allows that some ego is going to linger (located elsewhere on this website):
Parker: Ramakrishna refers to a "provisional ego," where there is a very thin line between that which is real and that which exists in time/space which allows some sort of presence in the world. I think he said something like fifteen out of sixteen particles are not there in an ego form, but it's that one-sixteenth of a particle left over that is able to interact with those who are still in possession of an ego.

Tolle: Yes, that's good.


* * * * *
One of the hallmarks of ego-power is opposition. But an enthusiastic person who is conscious can have a powerful and compassionate non-oppositional 'personality'. Tolle is quite clear in ANE about the modality of enthusiasm - an awakened person can certainly have this...in fact, an unconscious person, by his definition cannot be enthusiastic. There is discussion here in other threads about personality and ego. I guess 1/16th amounts to a 'ripple' in the Still Presence of Being. 'Self-Actualization' (Maslow) has elements of Presence and non-egoic interaction with others which can also be an important form of intimacy...'un-self-conscious love', if you will, wherein your egoic participation is so slight that to become 100% watcher is a very tiny move.

Namaste, Andy
A person is not a thing or a process, but an opening through which the universe manifests. - Martin Heidegger
There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present. - James Joyce

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Re: Ego is neccessary?

Post by Onceler » Sun Mar 09, 2008 2:35 pm

Fascinating experience, Billy,

Could you tell more about what led up to this expereince--like what were the workshop exercises you were doing and were they related to this experience?

thanks,
Be present, be pleasant.

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Re: Ego is neccessary?

Post by BillyPLed » Sun Mar 09, 2008 5:11 pm

Onceler wrote:Could you tell more about what led up to this expereince--like what were the workshop exercises you were doing and were they related to this experience?
I was attending the Level II Training in Integrative Restoration (iRest) Yoga Nidra as taught by Richard Miller, PhD. This was the second 40-hour training with him that I had attended. iRest is a modern adaptation of a very ancient practice known as Yoga Nidra. You can learn more about it by visiting his website at http://www.nondual.com.

It is perhaps too much to explain and do it justice in this post. However, what we were doing were "dyads" where we were practicing teaching iRest to an individual. iRest can be used with individuals or large groups. During a dyad or individual session there will be interaction with the person that you are working with. You will be able to ask questions and hear their answers. You can not do that with a group. With a group you are guiding them through the experience while they are unable to give you any feedback to let you know what is happening for them.

During the dyad one person plays the teacher/instructor/therapist and the other is the student/client. In simple terms there are two main "phases" of a single iRest session -- 1) welcoming what ever arises in awareness and exploring it in terms of where you feel it in the body, any emotions that arise with it, any thoughts, beliefs, memories, images, etc. and 2) dis-identifying (or deconstructing) which involves "feeling back" into Pure Awareness Itself -- free of identification with what is arising -- being Awareness Itself, within which everything is arising, unfolding and dissolving.

It was during two different dyads that I had the above experiences.
Billy in Lousiana

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